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Division of Forensic Psychology

The Division of Forensic Psychology promotes the professional interests of forensic psychologists and aims to contribute to the ongoing development of psychology as a profession and as a body of knowledge and skills.

Who we are

The Division of Forensic Psychology is the largest network of Forensic Psychologists in the UK, collectively representing the profession and associated professionals within the field. 

  • We aim to be responsive in supporting and advising members around professional practice issues
  • We are the professional voice for forensic psychology 
  • We promote forensic psychology in policy development 
  • We provide continuing professional development opportunities for members
  • We publish research and documents on key issues of relevance to our stakeholders

What is Forensic Psychology?

Forensic Psychology is the application of psychology with people and organisations connected with the Court, Health or Justice systems.  Our aims would include; working with people to create more hopeful futures, supporting pathways to safer communities and to assisting people with a range of mental health experiences towards pathways of recovery and reconnection. 

Forensic Psychologists work across many settings including, HM Prison and Probation Service, NHS Trusts, secure health services, Children's services, HM Courts & Tribunals, Universities, Social services, Police forces and a range of Government agencies.

In practice this means Forensic Psychologists work in a broad range of settings to apply the science of psychology to issues that affect people's lives.

Similar to other practitioner psychologists we engage in a process of assessment, formulation and psychological interventions with the people we work with. We seek to explore, understand and develop explanations for human behaviour and experiences and share these both with the people we work with and the wider multi-disciplinary teams.

We often develop and facilitate learning and teaching materials to support the organisations we work with to create safer, hopeful environments.  We also work to develop and to inform strategy and policy development at an organisational, national and international level. 

Division of Forensic Psychology

Find out more

Further reading about the Division of Forensic Psychology

Chair's message

It's a great privilege to be working as Chair of the DFP alongside an excellent committee who give their time voluntarily to support our profession and us all as members of the BPS.

We are a broad group of people who are connected under a common umbrella of forensic psychology.  Many of us are practitioners, forensic psychologists practicing in the UK.

A number of us are researchers dedicated to improving knowledge and the science that underpins practice or theoretical perspectives around our profession.

We also have a large number of student or graduate members who are on their journey with forensic psychology, exploring career options, hopefully expanding our family of forensic psychology in the future.

Wherever you are underneath this umbrella, we, the committee want to ensure you feel welcome and support you in feeling part of the family.

We have a significant problem of diversity across all aspects of membership and it's important for us to address this as a priority so that our family can expand, be more representative and inclusive, and so that people can consider our profession as an option for them, see people who look like them, hear people who share their experiences or culture and know that they 'fit' in our family, feel welcomed.

We have an EDI working party as part of the committee – our EDI work is the first item on our agenda at committee meetings, we are committed to thinking, action and committing finances in order to developing equality (equity) and inclusion.

It is hard for us to recognise how systems of privilege have been working in our own journeys, we don't notice them or think about them unless prompted.

It's important that we do that, prompt ourselves – how has privilege played a part in my journey in to forensic psychology so far?  How does this create bias for me? What can I to do address issues of inequality? Will I?

We hold a collective responsibility here and the more privilege we have, the more important it is that we support the burden for change from those who face greater barriers than we have faced. 

The committee often helps to prepare consultation responses which impact on policy.

It's important that when we speak we represent you, our members. If you have something you want to contribute to a consultation, please get in touch.

We are keen that the committee connect with members so that we can help the society hear the voice of members and prioritise activities and systems that support us and our profession.

We have a number of outflowing communication systems to you our members. We have social media presence on Facebook, Twitter (@BPSOfficialDFP) and on Instagram (for trainees – BPSTraineeFP); we have our monthly newsletter which lands in your email inbox, we have Forensic Update and our annual conferences.

We are working on the inflowing communication systems so that you can talk directly to us and we can listen. We have an email inbox for the division, so please do get in touch.

- Dr Nic Bowes, PhD. MSc. Forensic Psychologist, Chartered Psychologist, Europsych.

Strategic plan

The DFP committee have identified five core strategic aims for the next three years

This is not about writing another plan, but it is about consolidating our achievements over the past several years and trying to place the Division (and our members) in a position to meet current and future challenges and opportunities.  To this end, the current strategic plan seeks to focus on: communication with members and external stakeholders; engaging with our members to support mutual learning; developing skills amongst our membership in order to enhance practice and service delivery; collaborating and engaging with our stakeholders to inform policy and practice; and disseminating knowledge pertaining to forensic psychology amongst members and wider forensic psychology community.  

DFP Strategic Priorities

The strategic plan should be owned by all members of the Division and as Chair, I invite you to link in with the Committee to share ideas or to support some of the board's projects and initiatives.  Likewise, I ask you to become active participants, using the opportunities that you have in your own professional lives to help support and further these strategic aims whether this be by showcasing your work at conferences, publishing articles, informing government, organisations or policy, or sharing good practice from your own field relating to service delivery.  

Together we can further the field of forensic psychology and champion the discipline in the UK and internationally and hopefully this update to the Divisional strategic plan provides the impetus for this.

The DFP Strategic Plan

In an ever-changing world it is imperative that as a Division we keep abreast of developments in our profession, ensuring that we are able to respond to the needs of the communities and stakeholders that we serve.

DFP Strategic Plan

This download can only be accessed by DFP members

Devolved nations DFP pages

Division of Forensic Psychology

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Division of Forensic Psychology

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Publications

Forensic Update

Forensic Update aims to communicate current information on professional and practice matters to practitioners and researchers, and to act as a forum for discussion and debate. 

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Latest articles - Forensic Update

  • Periodicals

The characteristics, convictions, and incidents of risk of women in the national high secure healthcare service for women - Forensic Update

Volume: 1 Issue: 143

Author(s): Martin Clarke, Marie Williams, Yasmin Siddall, Jessica Lewis

Division of Forensic Psychology
  • Periodicals

Editorial from the guest editors - Forensic Update

Volume: 1 Issue: 144

Author(s): Sophie Ellis, Martine Ratcliffe

Division of Forensic Psychology
  • Periodicals

Book reviews - Forensic Update

Volume: 1 Issue: 143

Author(s): Cerys Miles

Division of Forensic Psychology
  • Periodicals

Reflections as a programme leader of MSc forensic psychology: Decolonising the forensic psychology curriculum in higher education1 - Forensic Update

Volume: 1 Issue: 144

Author(s): Rachael Dagnall

Division of Forensic Psychology
  • Periodicals

Technology innovation to support young people in the children and young people secure estate - Forensic Update

Volume: 1 Issue: 143

Author(s): Robyn Lee, Annette McKeown, Daniel Brown, Aileen Conlon, Perry Sutherland, Andrew Moss, Anthony Mitchell, Patrick J Kennedy

Division of Forensic Psychology

Issues in Criminological and Legal Psychology

These issues are only available to members of the Division of Forensic Psychology

Psychological Perspectives on Police and Custodial Culture and Organisation
Dangerous, Disordered and Doubly Deviant
Procedures in Criminal Justice: Contemporary Psychological Issues

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Issues in Forensic Psychology

These issues are only available to members of the Division of Forensic Psychology

What do forensic psychologists do?
Impact of offending
Positive directions for women in secure environments
DFP Conference 2006 - invited symposiums
Dangerous and severe personality disorder
Risk assessment and management
Readiness for treatment
Investigative psychology

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What is Forensic Psychology?

Our role relates to working with people who have been affected by crime or other legal systems (e.g. family courts).

Our aim is to work with people to help them address factors associated with risk of further offending and develop healthy, pro-social lives and contribute to a safer society.

Sometimes this involves exploring and understanding offending behaviour, vulnerabilities connected with offending behaviour (e.g. past trauma, substance use).

Our work is guided by empirically derived formulations, which feed in to treatment pathways, providing opportunities for recovery and rehabilitation. 

The daily key tasks for forensic psychologists may include:

  • Creating formulations of offence or other behaviours with people held in prison
  • Delivering evidence informed psychological therapy at an individual or group level
  • Supporting staff and multi-disciplinary teams to provide consistent care
  • Supporting evidence informed policy and practice to maintain a focus on recovery and reconnection
  • Evaluating and recommending changes to care where appropriate to ensure practice remains evidence driven

Forensic psychologists also provide evidence in legal or quasi-legal settings for parole boards and mental health tribunals.

How to Qualify?

To become a forensic psychologist you will need the following qualifications:

  1. Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC)
    - this is achieved by completing a society accredited degree or conversion course
  2. Society-accredited Masters in Forensic Psychology
  3. Completion of an HCPC approved programme

There are a number of routes to qualifications, some universities offer HCPC Approved programmes in Forensic Psychology, and the BPS also offers a qualification.

Read more about the Qualification in Forensic Psychology Stage 2.

Once you have completed your qualification, you will need to apply to be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) before practicing or referring to yourself as a forensic psychologist.

Contact the HCPC for more information on the entry requirements for their register.

DFP Awards 2024

The Division of Forensic Psychology annual awards celebrate excellence in Forensic Psychology practice and research, recognising success and sharing innovations and best practice in the field. 

To ensure that we celebrate the work and successes of our members we have this revised and extended the range of awards and updated the nomination process.

The DFP Committee hope that these changes will provide a renewed energy and focus in our awards while providing some continuation of the awards we have run for many years.

The winners of these awards will be announced in advance of the DFP Conference in June and the winners of each category will be invited to an awards presentation ceremony which will take place on Day one of the conference.

Please note: these awards are free to enter.

Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice

Deadline: 20 June 2024

The Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice Award replaces the Senior Practitioner Award.

We welcome nominations from or on behalf of Forensic Psychologists who have demonstrated excellence in practice.

Entry criteria

Nominations can be made either by or on behalf of a psychologist who conducts Forensic Psychology practice.

  • The nominee must be a member of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP) and an HCPC registered psychologist
  • The nominator can be anyone.

Assessment criteria

We will be assessing the extent to which the nominee has demonstrated excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice against the following areas:

  • Context: Considerations of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and how the impact the work has made in this area.
  • Evidence base: Quality of gathered information (theoretical/methodological basis/stakeholders/practitioners / organisational data).
  • Impact: The extent to which their work has had an impact on individuals, organisations and stakeholders (for example contribution to learning).
  • Visibility: The extent to which their work illustrates the value of Forensic Psychology.

Each criterion will be rated on a scale from 1-7 and a minimum of 16 points must be achieved in order to receive the award.

If no submissions of sufficient merit are received, no award will be made.

Guidance for nominations

You will need the following information:

Nominee information

(Q1) Nominee name

(Q2) Nominee BPS number

(Q3) Nominee institution

Nominator information

(Q4) Nominator name

(Q5) Nominator institution

(Q6) Nominator contact email address

You will also be asked to provide information in relation to the following questions:

(Q7) Please provide a summary of the nominee's work (max 300 words)

(Q8) Please describe how the work was influenced by or has impacted upon issues of equality, diversity and inclusion. 

(Q9) Please provide details of how they have developed the evidence for their approach (including theoretical or research basis, methodology, ethics) and how this demonstrates excellence in practice (max 300 words)

(Q10) Please provide details of how they delivered the project (including overcoming challenges, innovative practice) (max 300 words)

(Q11) Please outline the impact on the work (for example benefits for clients, end users, contribution to individual and organisational learning etc.) and how this has been evaluated (max 300 words)

How to apply

Submit a nomination

Nominations will close on 20 June 2024 at midnight.

Judging process

Awards will be judged by a panel of Forensic Psychologists from the Division of Forensic Psychology Committee.

The Award

The winners of these awards will be invited to attend the DFP2024 conference and receive their award in person.

They will also receive an e-certificate for their achievement.

Excellence in Forensic Psychology Research

Deadline: 20 June 2024

The Excellence in Forensic Psychology Research Award replaces our previous Senior Academic Award.

We would like to welcome nominations for exceptional research which has had a significant impact in the field of Forensic Psychology, for example further research, practice and policy.

Please note that those within five years of their Doctorate Level research should consider the Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice/Research (Early Career) Award.

Entry criteria

Nominations can be made either by or on behalf of an academic psychologist who conduct Forensic Psychology research.

  • The nominee must be a member of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP)        
  • The nominator can be anyone.

Assessment criteria

We will be assessing the extent to which the nominee has demonstrated excellence in Forensic Psychology research against the following areas:

  • People, culture and context: The extent to which the work includes considerations of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and how the impact the work has made in this area.  Co-creation/co-produced work is included here as is the reach of the research; national, international, world leading etc.
  • Contribution to knowledge and understanding in forensic psychology: details of the approach, robust design, quality research and how the work has extended the boundaries of knowledge or practice in forensic psychology.
  • Engagement and impact: The consequences of the research to real life experiences of people connected with forensic psychology and the impact of the work (national, international, global impact). Each will be rated on a scale from 1-7 and a minimum of 16 points must be achieved in order to receive the award.

If no submissions of sufficient merit are received, no award will be made.

Guidance for nominations

You will need the following information:

Nominee information

(Q1) Nominee name

(Q2) Nominee BPS number

(Q3) Nominee institution

Nominator information

(Q4) Nominator name

(Q5) Nominator institution

(Q6) Nominator contact email address

You will also be asked to provide information in relation to the following questions:

(Q7) Please provide an overview of the research undertaken (including scope, topics etc.) (max 300 words)

(Q8) Please provide details of the considerations of people, culture and context of the research; including considerations of co-creation, the context within which the research has been undertaken and considerations of applicability and generalisability along with the reach of the research in terms described above. 

(Q9) Please provide details as to how the research had stretched the boundaries of forensic psychology knowledge or practice.  Include here also details about the rigour or robust design, quality and approach.

(Q10) Please provide details about the engagement and impact of this work to the real-life experiences of forensic psychology populations, practice or knowledge, including the range of impact (national, international, world-leading).

How to apply

Submit a nomination

Nominations will close on 20 June 2024 at midnight.

Judging process

Awards will be judged by a panel of Forensic Psychologists from the Division of Forensic Psychology Committee.

The Award

The winners of these awards will be invited to attend the DFP2024 conference and receive their award in person.

They will also receive an e-certificate for their achievement.

Excellence in Forensic Psychology - Early Career

Deadline: 20 June 2024

The Excellence in Forensic Psychology (Early Career) Award replaces the Junior Award of the DFP.

It celebrates the work of those who have qualified more recently.

We welcome nominations from or on behalf of Forensic Psychologists who have demonstrated excellence in practice early within their career. =

Early career in the context of this award means within 5 years of HCPC qualification or being awarded a PhD or equivalent if the award relates to research activity.

Entry criteria

Nominations can be made either by or on behalf of a Forensic Psychologist who has engaged in Forensic Psychology Practice or conduct Forensic Psychology research.

  • The nominee must be a member of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP)
  • The nominator can be anyone

Assessment criteria

We will be assessing the extent to which the nominee has demonstrated excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice or Research against the areas outlined below. As an early career award, it will be evaluated in this context:

  • Context: Considerations of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and how the impact the work has made in this area
  • Impact: The extent to which their practice/ research has had an impact on individuals, organisations, policy or stakeholders
  • Science: The extent to which this person has produced robust, quality forensic practice or research
  • Visibility: The extent to which their practice illustrates the value of Forensic Psychology or the extent to which their research has been disseminated to those within the field and outside of this (for example publishing record, conference or public presentations)

Each will be rated on a scale from 1-7 and a minimum of 16 points must be achieved in order to receive the award.

If no submissions of sufficient merit are received, no award will be made.

Guidance for nominations

You will need the following information:

Nominee information

(Q1) Nominee name

(Q2) Nominee BPS number

(Q3) Nominee institution

Nominator information

(Q4) Nominator name

(Q5) Nominator institution

(Q6) Nominator contact email address

You will also be asked to provide information in relation to the following:

(Q7) Please provide a summary of the nominee's work (max 300 words)

(Q8) Please describe how the work was influenced by or has impacted upon issues of equality, diversity and inclusion. 

(Q9) Please provide details of how they have developed the evidence for their approach (including theoretical or research basis, methodology, ethics) and how this demonstrates excellence in practice/ research (max 300 words)

(Q10) Please outline the impact on the work (for example benefits for clients, end users, contribution to individual and organisational learning etc.) and how this has been evaluated (max 300 words)

How to apply

Submit a nomination

Nominations will close on 20 June 2024 at midnight.

Judging process

Awards will be judged by a panel of Forensic Psychologists from the Division of Forensic Psychology Committee.

The Award

The winners of these awards will be invited to attend the DFP2024 conference and receive their award in person.

They will also receive an e-certificate for their achievement.

Lifetime Contribution to Forensic Psychology

Deadline: 20 June 2024

The Lifetime Contribution to Forensic Psychology Award replaces the Lifetime Achievement Award.

We welcome nominations on behalf of Forensic Psychologists and academic psychologists who conduct Forensic Psychology research and who have made an outstanding and sustained contribution professionally.

This might be through work which has had a significant impact on the public, in developing our understanding of psychology in work contexts or a substantial contribution to the Division.

Entry criteria

Nominations can be made either by or on behalf of DFP members. Where self-nominations are made, we require a supporting nominator.

The nominee must:

  • Be a member of The Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP)
  • Have made a significant and profound impact in the field of forensic psychology
  • Have TWO nominators who can be anyone

Assessment criteria

We will be assessing the extent to which the nominee has made an outstanding and sustained contribution professionally.

They may have demonstrated leadership in professional society roles or within an academic or practice setting. Their impact may have been within the profession or across society and in government.

The following are examples of contexts in which you may have made a substantial contribution. These are not intended to be exhaustive or restrictive.

  • Broadening participation in Forensic Psychology
  • Contributed to a change in government policy
  • Contributed to a societal change
  • Contributed to raising standards
  • Raising the profile of Forensic Psychology
  • Significant and substantial contribution to the understanding of an area of Forensic psychology research/practice.
  • Significant contribution to the BPS in a leadership role (e.g. trustee or committee leadership)
  • Significant contribution to the DFP in a leadership role

Nominees will be assessed against the following criteria:

  • Competence: The extent to which this person's work ensured that new and existing members of the profession have the required skill sets to function effectively in their roles/ensured standards of practice of those using Forensic Psychology methods.
  • Employability: The extent to which this person has promoted opportunities for the employment of Forensic psychologists within diverse organisations.
  • Influence: The extent to which this person has impacted guidance and insight for policymakers, organisations, individuals, and stakeholders when making policy decisions that is informed by Forensic psychology.
  • Science: The extent to which this person has advanced knowledge or practice?
  • Visibility: The extent to which this person has increased the visibility of Forensic Psychology and raised public awareness of its contribution to society.

Each will be rated on a scale from 1-7 and a minimum of 20 points must be achieved in order to receive the award.

If no submissions of sufficient merit are received, no award will be made.

Guidance for nominations

You will need the following information:

Nominee information

(Q1) Nominee name

(Q2) Nominee BPS number

(Q3) Please provide details on how the nominee/lead has achieved an advanced stage in their career or details if the nominee\lead has retired from such role (max 300 words)

Nominator 1 & 2 information

(Q4) Nominator name

(Q5) Nominator institution

(Q6) Nominator contact email address

You will also be asked to provide information in relation to the following questions:

(Q7) Please provide an overview of the contexts in which the nominee has made an outstanding contribution (max 300 words)

(Q8) Please provide details of what was done/achieved to make an outstanding contribution (max 300 words)

(Q9) Please provide an explanation of the impact of the work (max 300 words)

How to apply

Submit a nomination

Nominations will close on 20 June 2024 at midnight.

Judging process

Awards will be judged by a panel of Forensic Psychologists from the Division of Forensic Psychology Committee.

The Award

The winners of these awards will be invited to attend the DFP2024 conference and receive their award in person. They will also receive an e-certificate for their achievement

Student Prize for Excellence in Forensic Psychology

Applications are currently closed.

The Student Prize for Excellence in Forensic Psychology recognises postgraduate and doctoral level projects that have made a valuable contribution and / or potential real world impact to the field of Forensic Psychology.

Entry criteria

Nominations can be made either by or on behalf of an individual engaging in research as part of their postgraduate level study.  

  • The nominee must
  1. Be a member of Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP) and 
  2. Be on a BPS accredited course
  3. Be registered at a UK institution on a postgraduate course related to Forensic Psychology (including a Stage 2 accredited course) or have graduated within the last year
  • The nominator can be anyone.

Assessment criteria

  • Competence: The extent to which this person's work has demonstrated excellence in research methodology (for example using innovative techniques).
  • Influence: The extent to which this person's research has contributed to knowledge, practice or policy.
  • Science: The extent to which this person has produced quality research (for example gaining quality samples, addressing real world problems etc.).
  • Visibility: The extent to which this person's research has demonstrated the value of Forensic Psychology?

Each will be rated on a scale from 1-7 and a minimum of 16 points must be achieved in order to receive the award.

If no submissions of sufficient merit are received, no award will be made.

Guidance for nominations

You will need the following information

Nominee information

(Q1*)Nominee name

(Q2*)Nominee institution

(Q3*)Nominee BPS number

(Q4*)Nominee course title

(Q5*)Please select one,

  1. Currently a postgraduate student on an accredited course of study
  2. Currently undertaking a Stage 2 qualification
  3. Graduated

(Q6*)When did the nominee graduate?

Nominator information 

(Q7*)Nominator name

(Q8*)Nominator institution

(Q9*)Nominator contact email address

You will also be asked to provide information in relation to the following questions:

(Q10*)Project Supervisor name

(Q11*)Project Supervisor position / title

(Q12*)Project Supervisor academic institution

(Q13*)Project Supervisor email address

(Q14*)Please provide details of:

  1. Name of project
  2. Date project was completed
  3. Institution where research was conducted

(Q15*)Please upload the project information (max 2,000 words).  Project information should cover the following areas:

  • An overview of the project conducted
  • An overview of the results found and the implications of these
  • How the nominee dealt with ethical issues in their project
  • The contribution provided to the field of Forensic psychology / potential real-world impact
  • The methodology adopted and the rationale underpinning this decision 
  • The theory underlining your project

How to apply

Judging process

Awards will be judged by a panel of Forensic Psychologists from the Division of Forensic Psychology Committee. 

Nominations will close at midnight on Friday 15 April 2022.

The Awards

The presentation ceremony will be held on the opening day of Division of Forensic Psychology Annual Conference at the Divisional Awards Ceremony. The winner will:

  1. Be invited to submit a poster presentation at the DFP conference this year
  2. Receive a certificate
  3. Receive an award

Expenses (maximum £150) and the one day conference admission will be covered.

Previous award winners

2021

DFP Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice or Research - Early Career Award 2020

Caitlin Brown 

DFP Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice Award  

Kerensa Hocking

DFP Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice Award  

Siobhan Keating

2020

Lifetime Achievement Award 

Adrian Needs 
Linda Blud

Excellence in Forensic Psychology – Research

Rebecca Milne

2014-2019

Award for Distinguished Contributions to Academic Knowledge in Forensic Psychology

2015: Graham Towl

Student Prize for Excellence in Forensic Psychology 

2019: Veronica Warn

Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice or Research - Early Career Award

2019: Tamsin Higgs

Excellence in Forensic Psychology Practice Award

2019: Claire Bainbridge

Lifetime Contribution to Forensic Psychology

2019: Theresa Gannon

Excellence in Forensic Psychology Research Award

2019: Kevin Browne

Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Practice in Forensic Psychology

2018: Geraldine Akerman

2017: Ruby Bell

2016: Dawn Fisher

2015: Roisin Hall

2014: Jacqueline Bates-Gaston

Junior Award in Forensic Psychology for work of outstanding quality and innovation

2018: Louise Carter

2017: Helen Thomas

2016: Juliane Kloess

2015: Jennifer Bamford

2014: Jamie Walton

DFP Conference Bursary Scheme 2024

The Division of Forensic Psychology is delighted to offer several bursaries this year, to attend our 2024 Annual Conference.

The bursaries cover full attendance at our three day conference this year in Cardiff, Wales between 1 July – 3 July.

Applicants will however be required to fund their own accommodation and travel.

All members of the DFP are welcome to apply.

Please also note that the conference dinner will not be covered, but this can be booked separately for £35.

The DFP intend for the bursaries to offer colleagues support and the opportunity for attending the conference which may contribute to aspects of their professional and/or academic development.

It is not the DFP committee's intention to substitute any responsibility from an employer to support their continuing professional development, but to offer the bursary in cases where the member does not have the financial resources despite trying to secure this.

Conditions

  • Bursaries will be allocated based on the order in which they are received and any applications received prior to the above date or after the closing date will not be considered. Incomplete, incorrect  forms will not be accepted.
  • Applications from successful conference bursary applicants from previous years' will not be accepted.
  • Please note that if you are successful in obtaining a bursary and then fail to attend the conference without evidence of acceptable extenuating (non-work related) circumstances, then you will be charged the cost price for the place.

Assessment criteria

To be eligible to apply for this bursary:

  • The applicant must demonstrate how they will secure their accommodation costs.
  • The applicant must have made attempts to secure funding from their employer in the first instance.

How to apply

Applications must be submitted online. No other form of application will be accepted.

Apply for a conference bursary now

The deadline for applications is 17:00 on 17 June 2024.

The DFP Committee

Chair - Nicola Bowes

Nic is a forensic psychologist and has experience working clinically with people who have committed serious offences.  Her specialism and research interests focus on criminal violence and the prevention of, treatment of and management of violence.

Nic's research was accepted within the Research Excellence Framework (REF), 2014 and the most recent REF of 2021. This means that at least 50% of her work was assessed as and judged to be either 'Internationally Excellent' or 'World Leading' and none of her work was rated as less than 'Internationally Recognised'.  

Nic has experience in directing clinical trials, in challenging environments (e.g. [prison settings) and undertaking some health economic outcomes (e.g. Bowes et al. 2014).  She works extensively with external partners to ensure her research is applied and has the potential to impact both policy and practice. 

She has undertaken more than 14 Knowledge Transfer projects which have provided several research (e.g. Bowes et al. 2012; McCarthy et al. 2011) and enterprise funding. Nic has successfully applied for various European funding applications, including a Horizon 2020 funded project which aimed to support young people and reduce the incidence of domestic violence in teenage relationships (www.lights4violence.eu). 

Nic has over 20 years experience of clinical experience, working with adults and young people who have committed serious violent offences. Many of the people Nic works with have experienced multiple Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and been exposed to traumatic events and these experiences are often functionally linked with their use of violence and aggression. 

As a result, people may present with a range of mental health difficulties, mental disorders, misuse substances, commit crimes and find it difficult to engage with services designed to support them.  Nic has extensive experience of working to overcome barriers to engagement and undertaken research in difficult environments in order to guide practitioners to work with those who most need the support of forensic psychology services.

Chair Elect - Sally-Anne Tilt

Sally is currently employed by HMPPS and located in the Midlands region. 

She has been a Chartered and Forensic Psychologist since 2001 and have over 21 years of experience working in forensic settings. Work settings include prisons, developing programmes for juveniles and adults, and training forensic practitioners in the UK and USA.  

Sally's areas of specialist interest are rehabilitative custodial environments, fire-setting and forensic risk assessment. 

Honorary Treasurer - Jacqueline Bates-Gaston

Biographical information TBA.

Honorary Secretary - Palwinder Athwal-Kooner

Biographical information to follow.

Conference Lead - Madeline Smyth

Biographical information to follow.

Policy Lead - Catherine Flowers

Biographical information to follow.

CPD Lead - Michelle Smith

Michelle Smith is a BPS chartered and HCPC registered Forensic Psychologist at the University of Lincoln, undertaking teaching, research and professional practice consultancy.

She has provided Forensic Psychology services across HMPPS, NHS, University and independent organisations as well as private practice for 25 years. Areas of forensic practice include risk assessment, intervention, supervision and consultancy.

She has expertise in working with individuals in the criminal justice, health and social care sector experiencing trauma and related personality or mental health difficulties. Her special interest is the training and development of professional competencies for forensic, health and social care staff including provision of supervision and reflective practice and promotion of resilience and professional boundaries.

She is currently the CPD lead on the BPS Division of Forensic Psychology Committee.

Consultations Lead - Nicola Bowes

Nic is a forensic psychologist and has experience of working clinically with people who have committed serious offences.  Her specialism and research interests focus on criminal violence and in the prevention of, treatment of and management of violence. 

Nic's research was accepted within the Research Excellence Framework (REF), 2014 and the most recent REF of 2021. This means that at least 50% of her work was assessed as and judged to be either 'Internationally Excellent' or 'World Leading' and none of her work was rated as less than 'Internationally Recognised'.  

Nic has experience in directing clinical trials, in challenging environments (e.g. [prison settings) and undertaking some health economic outcomes (e.g. Bowes et al. 2014).  She works extensively with external partners to ensure her research is applied and has the potential to impact both policy and practice.  

She has undertaken more than 14 Knowledge Transfer projects which have provided several research (e.g. Bowes et al. 2012; McCarthy et al. 2011) and enterprise funding. Nic has successfully applied for various European funding applications, including a Horizon 2020-funded project which aimed to support young people and reduce the incidence of domestic violence in teenage relationships (www.lights4violence.eu). 

Nic has over 20 years experience of clinical experience, working with adults and young people who have committed serious violent offences.  Many of the people Nic works with have experienced multiple Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and been exposed to traumatic events and these experiences are often functionally linked with their use of violence and aggression. 

As a result, people may present with a range of mental health difficulties, mental disorders, misuse substances, commit crimes and find it difficult to engage with services designed to support them.  Nic has extensive experience working to overcome barriers to engagement and has undertaken research in difficult environments in order to guide practitioners to work with those who most need the support of forensic psychology services. 

Committee Member - Geraldine Akerman

Biographical information to follow.

Committee Member - Paul-John Griffiths

Committee Member - Karen Howell

Bio TBC.

Committee Member - Rachael Wheatley

Rachael has been a Chartered and Registered Forensic Psychologist since 2004, with 20 years' experience working with a variety of forensic client groups residing in and out of custody. 

Rachael is currently employed by HMPPS and located in the Midlands. 

Rachael's areas of specialist interest are risk assessment, developing and delivering interventions for individual who commit stalking offences, providing risk management advice and consultancy regarding stalking offences.

Committee Member - Traci Tracy

Biographical information to follow.

Committee Member - Louise Bowers

Biographical information to follow. 

Committee Member - Adrian Needs

Biographical information to follow.

DFP Northern Ireland Chair - Sarah Ruston

Biographical information to follow.

DFP Scotland Chair - Adam Mahoney

Biographical information to follow.

DFP Wales Chair - Cery Miles

Biographical information to follow.

DCP Forensic Faculty Representative - Alethea Adair-Stantiall

Biographical information to follow.

Forensic Update Co-Editor - Martin Fisher

Martin has been a Regional Lead Psychologist for HMPPS since 1999 and has worked in HMPS since 1988 across all population types as well as in HQ roles. He is the Research Lead Psychologist for HMPPS Psychology. 

Martin is currently on the BPS Ethics Committee and an Assessor for the Qualification in Forensic Psychology. In addition, for the Psychological Testing Committee he is Vice Chair for the Committee on Testing Standards, a Forensic Testing Verifier and also a member of the Diploma in Psychometric Testing Working Party.

Martin is Honorary Consultant and Forensic Psychologist within Southern Health Foundation Trust and a Honorary Lecturer in Forensic Psychology at Portsmouth University. Further he is Co-Chair of Prospect Trade Union representing Psychology and affiliated specialists employed by HMPPS.

Martin's areas of specialist interest are practitioner ethics and boundary management, psychometric testing, research design, violent and sexual offenders, transgender offenders, consulting in forensic practice; applying forensic practice in clinical settings.

Forensic Update Co-Editor - Rachel Worthington

Biographical information to follow.

Diversity Representative - Martine Ratcliffe

Biographical information to follow.

Getting Involved with the DFP Committee

The Division of Forensic Psychology relies on a wide range of people getting involved, and the work of the Division is largely achieved through the dedication of unpaid volunteers.

Our volunteers come from a wide range of different backgrounds, whether they be practitioners or academics, or full members or in-training members, and together form an open and inclusive community.

Get in touch

The first point of contact for any queries regarding the work of the Division of Forensic Psychology should be the Member Network Services Team.

The Member Network Services team provides support to all our Member Networks.

Forensic Update

For potential submissions or book reviews please contact Forensic Update directly.