A representation of Psyche, taken from the BPS logo

Wider Psychological Workforce

Whether you’re looking for a psychological professional as an individual or as an employer, you can use our Wider Psychological Workforce Register.

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About

The register lets you search for professionals who are working in psychological practitioner and applied psychology roles that are not regulated by law. The register is an individual registration scheme that shows those registered have the necessary knowledge, skills and experience to practice in their role and shows commitment to their area of practice.

Search the Wider Psychological Workforce Register

The requirements and standards an individual needs to demonstrate to be listed on the register have been developed in collaboration with NHS England and NHS Education for Scotland (for Scottish CAAP roles) – so you can be confident in your search with us.

Who we are

We are the British Psychological Society (BPS). We are a registered charity which acts as the representative body for psychology and psychologists in the UK, and is responsible for the promotion of excellence and ethical practice in the science, education, and application of the discipline.

Find out more about who we are and what we do.

We have been approved by NHS England to provide an individual registration scheme for psychological wellbeing practitioners, children’s wellbeing practitioners and education mental health practitioners, having met the requirements for NHS England recognition.

We also register applied psychology roles in the psychological professions across the four nations that are not regulated by law and fall outside of NHS England’s registration scheme, including Clinical Associate in Applied Psychology in Scotland and Clinical Associate in Psychology developed in England.

We are the accrediting body for the training courses for all of these roles. We work in partnership with education providers to ensure quality standards in education and training are met by all the programmes we accredit. You can find an accredited course through our accredited course search.

About the Professional Standards Authority Accredited Registers Scheme

The British Psychological Society (BPS) Wider Psychological Workforce Register has applied to be an accredited register of the Professional Standards Authority (PSA). The PSA accredits registers so that the public can be confident when using the services provided by health and care practitioners on those registers.

The Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care promotes the health, safety and wellbeing of patients, service users and the public by raising standards of regulation and registration of people working in health and care. It is an independent body, accountable to the UK Parliament, with public protection at the heart of everything they do.

The PSA oversee regulators who register health and care professionals working in regulated professions and therefore regulate the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) who are responsible for regulating practitioner psychologists.

The PSA also independently assess and accredit other organisations who register practitioners whose roles are not regulated by law, working both within and outside the NHS.  Those organisations that meet the PSA standards are awarded with a quality mark, demonstrating commitment to the health, wellbeing and safety of the public. The accredited registers scheme covers a number of psychological professions including: Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners, Children’s Wellbeing Practitioners, Education Mental Health Practitioners, Clinical Associates in Applied Psychology (in Scotland) and Clinical Associates in Psychology.

Voluntary registration with a register that is approved by the PSA is the approach that is taken with many health and care professional roles that are not subject to statutory regulation to ensure oversight of practitioners in those roles for the protection of the public.

BPS as a professional body

The BPS is a registered charity which acts as the representative body for psychology and psychologists in the UK, and is responsible for the promotion of excellence and ethical practice in the science, education and application of the discipline.

BPS as an accrediting body

The society is an accrediting body, accrediting education and training programmes in psychology.

Accreditation is the means by which the society reaches a view on whether psychology courses are suitable to support students’ achievement of learning outcomes, and are supported by an appropriate resource base.

It ensures that they have studied the required curriculum (whether at undergraduate or postgraduate level) in sufficient breadth and depth, and is the means by which the society engages in dialogue with providers of psychology education and training, and provides a detailed external review of the provision in question.

The standards for accreditation reflect the requirements necessary for membership of the Society at particular levels and for entry on to the Wider Psychological Workforce Register.

BPS as a registering body

The society holds a number of directories and registers that members can apply to join. Our directories enable members to advertise their services and our registers enable members to highlight their training and experience in particular areas and gain recognition of their knowledge skills and competence. 

Registration with the Wider Psychological Workforce Register demonstrates a psychological professional’s commitment to their area of practice and demonstrates that they have the necessary knowledge, skills and experience to practice. They are part of a professional community that works to high standards, policies and codes of conduct and practice.

For employers, registration gives confidence that competency, high standards and safe practice are maintained through a code of practise and continuing professional development. It also shows that the individual is committed to developing themselves professionally. Some employers such as the NHS require registration as a condition of employment.

For patients and the public it helps them to feel confident that the psychological professional they see is competent, trustworthy and maintains high standards. It ensures that action is taken to protect them from risk by managing complaints and fitness to practise concerns as part of a government backed scheme to protect the public.

As the society is the accrediting body for the training programmes for each of the roles on the register and also offers individual registration for these roles conflicts of interest are carefully managed within each Committee and Board to ensure openness, transparency and appropriate management. The accreditation and registration processes and procedures are managed by distinct teams.

Find out more about our governance.

Regulation and Registration

The Health and Care professions Council (HCPC) is the UK regulator for psychologists and protects nine titles of psychologist: Clinical Psychologist, Counselling Psychologist, Educational Psychologist, Forensic Psychologist, Health Psychologist, Occupational Psychologist, Sport and Exercise Psychologist, Registered Psychologist and Practitioner Psychologist.

There are a number of psychological professional roles that are not regulated by law, and therefore not regulated by the HCPC, including the roles listed on the society’s Wider Psychological Workforce Register.

Voluntary registration with a register that is approved by the PSA is the approach that is taken with many health and care professional roles that are not subject to statutory regulation to ensure oversight of practitioner in those unregulated roles for the protection of the public.

Become registered

What is registration and who is it for?

The Wider Psychological Workforce Register is an individual registration scheme for those working in psychological practitioner and applied psychology roles that are currently not regulated by law.

Individual registration provides a recognised framework that demonstrates registered psychological practitioners have the necessary knowledge, skills and experience to practice.

Registration is voluntary, however some employers may require you to be registered in your role as a condition of your employment.

On successful application, your name, role and employing organisation will be published on our register. This shows that you meet our standards for registration and demonstrates to employers and the public that you are committed to maintaining high-quality standards in clinical practice, supervision and continuing professional development and operate safely within a code of practice.

What roles do we register?

There are a number of roles on the Wider Psychological Workforce Register.

These include: 

Wellbeing Practitioner roles:
  • Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) - registration now open
  • Children’s Wellbeing Practitioner (CWP) - registration to open in 2022
  • Education Mental Health Practitioner (EMHP) - registration to open in 2022
Associate Psychology roles:
  • Clinical Associate in Applied Psychology (CAAP) Scotland - registration now open
  • Clinical Associate in Psychology (CAP) - registration to open in 2022
Find out more about these roles and the training requirements

Why register with us?

The wider psychological workforce is a diverse, growing and highly valued profession. That’s why our register is just the first step towards a number of new developments that recognise those working in roles as part of the psychological professions.

There are a number of ways we support you:

  • Accreditation standards – we are the accrediting body for the training programmes which lead to the roles that we are registering.
  • Developing new membership grades and benefits – changes to our member grades have recently been approved by member vote. The proposed changes to our charter, statutes and rules mean we will refresh our membership grades and offer a grade of membership specifically for psychological practitioners being registered. These changes will take place during 2022.
  • Developing a range of continuing professional development opportunities.
  • Promoting these roles through our careers resources and information.

 As a member, you can access a range of benefits, including continuing professional development opportunities on BPS Learn– our online learning platform. Plus, as a member you can access all our courses and webinars at exclusive member rates. .  We’ll also be developing a community of practice for wider psychological workforce registrants – look out for more information coming soon.

We believe that developments in the psychological professions should be underpinned by quality standards, professional recognition, career opportunities and continuing professional development in a professional body home.

Our ambition is to offer a comprehensive framework of support and recognition for the wider psychological professions, working in partnership with our members to achieve this. We want to ensure that those working in these roles are part of a community where they have access to insight across psychology and psychologically informed developments to expand their own learning and practice as a psychological professional.

Eligibility to join the register

What do you need to do to join the register?

To join the register, you will need:

  1. To be a graduate member or affiliate subscriber of the BPS
  2. To meet the eligibility requirements for your specific role including having completed the accredited training
  3. To complete the application form including supervisor reference and academic transcript
  4. To pay your application and registration fees
Joining the BPS

If you’re not already a member of the BPS then you will need to join us as a graduate member or an affiliate subscriber before applying to join the register.

Graduate membership

To join as a graduate member, you will need to have achieved at least a 2:2 and passed the empirical project in an undergraduate degree accredited by us, or have completed an accredited conversion course.

What is the cost of graduate membership?
  • If you graduated within the last five years from the qualification giving eligibility for graduate membership the fee is £70.80.
  • Standard graduate membership fee is £141.60.
Affiliate subscriber

If you are not eligible to join us as a graduate member, you can join as an affiliate subscriber.

You can find the benefits of being an affiliate subscriber on our website.

What is the cost to become an affiliate subscriber?

To join as an affiliate subscriber the cost is £105.60.

To find out more information about our membership grades and to join us, visit our join us page.

Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) registration

The requirements to register as a PWP are:

  • Completion of a BPS-accredited PWP training programme (search our list of accredited PWP programmes). If qualifying by the apprenticeship route, in addition PWPs must have passed the apprenticeship end-point assessment with the apprenticeship certificate required as evidence.

The only exception from the requirements outlined above are the completion of the forerunner trainings or the Health Education England commissioned 2021 ‘PWP Assessment of Competence Scheme’ as outlined in the IAPT manual.

  • Confirmation of current employment in a specified system of care. In order to meet requirements for individual registration, PWPs will operate within a clearly identified stepped-care pathway such as an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) service returning data to NHS Digital in England. This means that the service within which they work will allow seamless stepping-up and stepping-down of treatment. Registrants will be delivering evidence-based interventions across the adult age span, working with common mental health problems and long term physical health problems with a psychological component. They must be receiving case and clinical supervision for their work. They will also use routine outcome measures. This will be evidenced through the provision of a supervisor reference.
  • Six months experience of working within the specified system of care that ensures the right pathways of referral on/stepping up in a stepped-care pathway and good clinical governance. The six months can include time spent working as a trainee.

If you have been employed in your current post for less than 6 months you will need to provide a supervisor reference from your previous supervisor and your current supervisor as part of your application. Further information can be found in the PWP Supervisor Reference Form. 

Minimum clinical practice requirements

In order to ensure that all PWPs practice to the high standard we expect and maintain versatile competence, a minimum of two hours clinical practice per week is required to meet registration criteria.  This clinical practice must include both assessment and treatment at Step 2 and delivery must be via live interventions e.g. telephone, video or face to face. Computerised CBT can be undertaken but cannot be included in these two hours.

Adult IAPT services commissioned to work with ages 16+

PWPs working in services that are commissioned to provide adult IAPT for patients aged 16-18 are eligible to register and must be working within the specified system of care outlined.

Eligibility for PWP provisional accreditation

Registering as a PWP with the BPS provides eligibility for BABCP’s Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes (KSA) condensed portfolio for provisional accreditation.

Further information about PWP Registration

NHS England, BPS and BABCP, held an open webinar in April 2022 to provide information on PWP registration.

You may read the responses to questions raised during the session which have been provided by NHS England.

Clinical Associate in Applied Psychology (CAAP) Scotland registration

A registrant will either register as a CAAP-Child (working with children and young people as their specified client group), or a CAAP-Adult (working with adults as their specified client group), depending upon the training they have undertaken.

The requirements to register as a CAAP are:

  • Completion of a BPS-accredited CAAP training programme (search our list of accredited CAAP programmes).
  • Confirmation of current employment as a CAAP. In order to meet requirements for individual registration, CAAPs will work with specific or particular client groups delivering psychological assessments, formulations, interventions, evaluation and research within their scope of practice. CAAPs work is limited to a defined range and severity of problems experienced by a particular client group, and will be carried out with the support and under supervision. Clinical supervision of CAAPs is provided by clinical psychologists or in circumstances judged appropriate by the Health Board Professional Lead for Psychology, may be delegated to other applied psychologists or CAAPS with two years post qualification experience and the relevant supervision training (NES Training in Generic Supervision Competences for Psychological Therapies NES:GSC is required).
  • Six months experience working as a CAAP and with the population you have trained to work with. This six months can include time spent working as a trainee.

If you have been employed in your current post for less than 6 months you will need to provide a supervisor reference from your previous supervisor and your current supervisor as part of your application. Further information can be found in the CAAP Supervisor Reference Form. 

CAAPs working in specialist services e.g. learning disability services, health, eating disorders, chronic pain, oncology

As agreed with NHS Education for Scotland, we are not overly prescriptive on how a CAAP provides details of their employer, recognising that CAAPs work in various settings to respond to the needs of services and service users. You will meet the requirements for registration as long as you are working with the client group that you have been trained to work with (children, young people and their families or adults), have completed a BPS-accredited CAAP training programme, can provide confirmation of your current employment as a CAAP working under appropriate supervision and have six months experience working as a CAAP which can include time spent working as a trainee.

How to apply

Applying for registration is a simple application process outlined below.

The application process is via BPS portal. You will need to provide all relevant information such as your personal details, place of work and qualifications.

Become a member
  • Join the society as an associate member of graduate member
Complete the application forms
  • Make sure that you meet the eligibility criteria and have read the Fitness to Practise Framework
  • Download and complete the application form and supervisor reference form
Return the forms and pay the application fee
  • Return the application forms to us via the link specified in the form. This includes your academic transcript, apprenticeship certificate (if applicable) and supervisor reference form
  • Our membership team will contact you to pay the one-off £27 application fee
Complete registration
  • If you meet the requirements for registration and your application is successful, you will then pay the registration fee and appear on the register

Make sure you meet the eligibility criteria before applying to the register.

To apply to the register, you must complete one of the application forms below and return it via the link specified within the form.

You will have to pay a one-off application fee of £27.

Registration fees

If you meet all the requirements for registration and your application is successful, you will then be asked to pay the required registration fee.

  • Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP, CWP and EMHP): £50
  • Associate Psychologist (CAAP and CAP): £62

To remain on the register you will need to pay your registration fee annually. You will be invoiced at the same time each year, or you can choose to set up a Direct Debit with us.

If, for any reason, you choose not to renew your registration, your member benefits will remain unchanged and you will continue to be charged the relevant annual amount based on your member grade.

What information is displayed to the public?

Once your application is approved and you have paid your registration fee you will appear on the register so that members of the public or employers can search to see if you are listed on the register.

The register will display your name, membership post nominal, unique register ID, registered role and location of your employing organisation

If there is a complaint raised against you and it is considered serious enough to suspend you from the register whilst an investigation takes place, or if the complaint is upheld after investigation, the society will, in accordance with the process outlined in the Complaints Procedure, change your entry on the register to denote the existence or outcome of a complaint and publish a short description of the complaint, and any sanction applied, on our website. This is to ensure that we fulfil our duty of public protection.

Further information can be found in our complaints procedure.

Declarations for registration

There are a number of declarations that you will need to confirm and agree to as part of joining the register.

As part of the registration process, applicants are required to read and agree to abide by the Fitness to Practise Framework.

You should inform us of any disciplinary proceedings or complaints made against you or any changes in employment circumstance that potentially relate to an impairment of fitness to practise as outlined in the Fitness to Practise Framework.

You should declare this as part of your application process and any time throughout your registration.

If you are unable to sign the declarations to join the register because of any disciplinary proceedings or complaints made against you, please contact our membership team at [email protected].

Once you have contacted our membership team, your details will be passed to the Register Fitness to Practise Team and we will be in touch to ask for further information as your application will be considered taking into account the circumstances you have raised. A panel, drawn from the Standing Panel who consider complaints, will investigate concerns about the safety or effectiveness of registrants’ work (their fitness to practise). We will investigate whether there is or may be, a risk to people who are receiving psychological treatment or services provided by you as a registrant. We look at every case individually and keep you informed of progress, and follow out our process as outlined in the Complaints Procedure to make a decision about your admittance on to the register.

Registration and membership expectations

You will need to be a member of the society to join the register.

As a member of the society you will sign up to our Member Conduct Rules and act in accordance with our  Code of Ethics and Conduct. The Code of Ethics and Conduct is the overarching guidance document for all members, which you should familiarise yourself with.

As a registrant you will be required to operate in accordance with the Fitness to Practise Framework. This sets out the required conduct and ethical expectations of all registrants and is based on the Society’s Code of Ethics and Conduct.

In addition, registrants will be expected to comply with the requirements for maintaining their registration (see our information on 'Maintaining your registration').

The Society publishes a range of guidance documents, including the Practice Guidelines, which will have useful information for registrants to consider for informing their decision-making. Registrants should be aware that these guidance documents may have been written for a wider or different audience and not specifically intended to support the scope of practice of WPW registrants. Whilst this guidance should be helpful in parts, the expectations of registrants are clearly set out in the Member Conduct Rules, the Code of Ethics and Practice, and the Fitness to Practise Framework.

Contact us

If you would like more information about becoming registered or to find out the status of your application, please contact [email protected]

Registrants

Maintaining your registration

Your registration is valid for a period of one year and to remain on the register you will need to pay the registration fee annually.

You’ll be invoiced for each year around the anniversary of when you first joined. You will also make a declaration by renewing your registration that you are fulfilling the required clinical supervision and continuing professional development (CPD) activities for your role and you continue to abide by and operate within the Fitness to Practise Framework.

The registration fee is £50 for Wellbeing Practitioner roles (PWP, CWP and EMHP) and £62 for Associate Psychology roles (CAAP and CAP).

You will receive a reminder three months before your registration is due for renewal and will have 60 days to make the payment to continue your registration. If we do not receive your renewal payment your registration will lapse and you will no longer appear on the register.

We operate a no refund policy. Once registration is paid for the period of one year it is non-refundable.

You can record your supervision and CPD activities on the MyCPD platform which is available to all members and can be found under your account profile on the BPS website.

A clinical supervision and CPD audit will take place every two years. This audit will be on approximately five per cent of individuals or 20 registrants, whichever is greater, on the register for each role.

Those selected for audit will be contacted via email with further information on the submission requirements.

Registration and membership expectations

You will need to be a member of the society to join the register.

As a member of the society you will sign up to our Member Conduct Rules and act in accordance with our  Code of Ethics and Conduct. The Code of Ethics and Conduct is the overarching guidance document for all members, which you should familiarise yourself with.

As a registrant you will be required to operate in accordance with the Fitness to Practise Framework. This sets out the required conduct and ethical expectations of all registrants and is based on the society’s Code of Ethics and Conduct.

In addition, registrants will be expected to comply with the requirements for maintaining their registration (link – Rachel Scudamore to provide document).

The Society publishes a range of guidance documents, including the Practice Guidelines, which will have useful information for registrants to consider for informing their decision-making.

Registrants should be aware that these guidance documents may have been written for a wider or different audience and not specifically intended to support the scope of practice of WPW registrants.

Whilst this guidance should be helpful in parts, the expectations of registrants are clearly set out in the Member Conduct Rules, the Code of Ethics and Practice, and the Fitness to Practise Framework.

Continuing Professional Development and Supervision

By paying your registration fee when renewing your registration each year you confirm that you continue to meet the requirements to be registered on the Wider Psychological Workforce Register and that you have fulfilled the required standards of supervision and Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

Role: PWP
CPD and Supervision Requirements:

As part of annual renewal of registration, registrants will be required to make a declaration that they have fulfilled the required standards of supervision and CPD. This is verified by selection of a randomised audit sample.

Annual CPD requirements for PWPs:

PWPs are expected to engage in a minimum of five activities drawn from across the range of listed acceptable types of learning and development activities.

A CPD reflective statement is required for each of the five activities.

At least three of the five reflective practice statements of CPD activity each year must directly relate to relevant CBT informed approaches or CBT principles.

Supervision requirements for PWPs:

The Supervision requirements are based on the IAPT Manual 2020 (page 20)

PWP Registration requires regular live assessment of practice as part of the Clinical Skills Supervision arrangements. This involves at least two instances of live assessment per year demonstrating two different interventions using the IAPT PWP intervention skills assessment mark sheet or an approved assessment document. A Clinical Skills supervision report must be provided for these two Clinical Skills supervision assessments. The supervisor will review two live treatment tapes of different interventions and provides a report based on a form of competency assessment.

Registered PWPs will continue to have at least 1 hour per week of individual Clinical Case Management Supervision (CCMS), and on average 1 hour per fortnight of Clinical Skills Supervision (CSS), focused on case discussions and skills development. CCMS and CSS logs are to be submit as evidence as part of audit requirements.

Role: CAAP
CPD and Supervision Requirements:

As part of annual renewal of registration, registrants will be required to make a declaration that they have fulfilled the required standards of supervision and CPD. This is verified by random audit.

Annual CPD requirements for CAAPs:
  • CAAPs are expected to engage in a minimum of five activities drawn from across the range of listed acceptable types of learning and development activities.
  • A CPD reflective statement is required for each of the five activities.
  • At least three of the five activities and reflective practice statements of CPD activity each year will be in an area relevant to their scope of practice with either children, young people and families or adults depending on the specific population the CAAP has been trained to work with.
  • These reflective statements should demonstrate how the CPD undertaken has furthered knowledge and skills in psychological assessment, formulation, intervention and evaluation with either children, young people and families or adults depending on the specific population the CAAP has been trained to work with.
Supervision requirements for CAAPs:

Registered CAAPs will continue to have fortnightly clinical supervision pro rata for a full time member of staff.

Recording your supervision and CPD

As members of the society, you will have access to the BPS MyCPD platform to record your supervision and CPD.

The MyCPD platform supports you to plan your development and record activities, including the upload of evidence e.g. certificates and reflect on your learning. You can also generate reports on all of the content.

It is expected that you will record all of your required supervision and CPD activities on this platform.

If you are selected for audit you will be required to evidence that you have met all the requirements by providing a report of the required content.

Find out more about maintaining your registration on the Wider Psychological Workforce Register including the acceptable types of CPD learning and development activities and the society's approach to audit.

Change of employment or change of job role

If you change employment but are remaining within your current registered role, you need to let us update your new employment details via your portal page so that this information is updated on the register.

If you are no longer employed within the role that you are registered with you will need to resign from the Wider Psychological Workforce register because you are no longer working within the scope of practise or specified system of care outlined for your role which is a requirement to appear on the register.

Please contact [email protected] so that we can update your record and the register.

Managing concerns and complaints

In providing a register for members of the Wider Psychological Workforce, we are committed to fulfilling our role of protecting the public. We will consider fairly all complaints received about registrants, in an open and transparent way.

For the Wider Psychological Workforce Register, we will investigate issues relating to the fitness to practice of registrants in line with the objective of maintaining public protection.

The <complaints policy> gives full details of what matters are eligible as complaints, how complaints are managed, and what sanctions might be issued if a complaint is upheld.

If you can’t find what you need, please contact the complaints team by emailing us at [email protected] or phoning us on 0116 252 9919.

Frequently Asked Questions

What psychological professions does registration refer to?

Registration on the British Psychological Society (BPS) Wider Psychological Workforce Register refers to five psychological practitioner roles that are not regulated by law.

  • Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners (PWP)
  • Children’s Wellbeing Practitioners (CWP)
  • Education Mental Health Practitioners (EMHP)
  • Clinical Associates in Applied Psychology (CAAP) Scotland
  • Clinical Associates in Psychology (CAP)

Who is providing the registration scheme?

The BPS and the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) have been approved by NHS England to provide an individual registration scheme for PWPs, CWPs and EMHPs, having met the requirements for NHS England and NHS Improvement recognition in June 2021.

It has been agreed with NHS England, BABCP and BPS that collectively these three occupations will be referred to as Wellbeing Practitioners within the framework of the twelve core psychological professions as defined by NHS England.

The BPS also register other roles in the psychological professions across the four nations that are not regulated by law and fall outside of NHS England’s registration scheme.

This includes the CAAP role in Scotland and the new CAP role developed in England.

What does registration mean and who is it for?

The register is for individual practitioners who commit to maintain high quality standards in clinical practice, supervision and CPD.

It also signifies that the registrant is working in the context of an appropriate system of care, working within their field of competence and working under appropriate supervision.

People on the register will adhere to a fitness to practise framework.

The aim of the register is to protect the public, employers and other agencies to help them find psychological practitioners who meet these standards.

Why are you registering these particular roles?

The PWP, CWP and EMHP roles are recognised as important roles to meet the growing needs of those seeking mental health support and expanding access to psychological approaches to healthcare.

These psychological professions are not regulated by law. This means that there is no overarching body or bodies which assure the fitness of these roles to practise.

Registration of these roles will help to provide recognition for this growing workforce and will promote public confidence in the competence of these psychological professionals. Registration also provides additional benefits of belonging to a professional community and having access to appropriate CPD, knowledge exchange and interprofessional networking.

CAAPs are an established role within Scotland and NHS Education for Scotland, Heads of Psychology Scotland and other important stakeholders are supportive of the development of a registration scheme.

Similarly for the new CAP role in England, employers see the importance of registration to recognise these practitioners and provide an extra layer of governance for this role, assuring employers and the public of professional competence.

As with the other roles, registration also provides additional benefits of belonging to a professional community and having access to appropriate CPD, knowledge exchange and inter-professional networking.

When will the register launch for CWPs, EMHPs and CAPs?

The Wider Psychological Workforce Register launched in June 2021, starting with the PWP and CAAP role.

Registration of EMHPs and CWPs will follow once registration criteria has been finalised through NHS England and Health Education England.

Registration for CAPs will follow once training programmes have applied and become accredited against the BPS course accreditation standards and registration criteria has been agreed with key stakeholders.

Do I have to be registered to practice in my role?

Professional registration is a requirement set by the NHS for PWPs. PWPs are expected to maintain continuous registration as set out in the IAPT manual.  

Although voluntary and not mandated by law, it is expected that employers will see registration as good practice and it is likely that registration will become a requirement for these roles.

Are the registration schemes for PWP, CWP and EMHP delivered by BPS and BABCP the same?

Both schemes have been designed to meet the specification set by NHS England. They require equivalent standards and have equivalent processes for addressing complaints or problems.

They will also share information about disciplinary processes that result in a change in registration status, so that an individual's record travels with them if they leave one register and join the other.

What are the eligibility requirements for registration?

There are distinct registration requirements for each occupation and those wishing to register must register against the role that they are employed in.

The eligibility requirements include:

  • the completion of an accredited training programme for the role, currently this is only the British Psychological Society.
  • confirmation of employment in an appropriate specified system of care through the provision of a supervisor reference.
  • six months experience working within a specified system of care. This six months can include time spent working as a trainee.

Further details of the registration requirements are available on our website, including details of the requirements of an appropriate specified system of care.

Which training courses are recognised?

For PWP, CWP and EMHP registration you will need to have undertaken and successfully completed an accredited training at a Higher Education Institution that successfully delivers the HEE/NHSE/I recognised national curriculum for the role and is accredited by the BPS.

For CAAP and CAP registration you will need to have undertaken and successfully completed a training programme for the role that is accredited by the BPS.

What is the difference between accreditation and registration?

Accreditation and registration are used interchangeably across organisations.

When the BPS talks about accreditation, we are talking about the accreditation of training programmes.

Accreditation Through Partnership is the process by which the BPS works with education and training providers to ensure quality standards in education and training are met by programmes on an ongoing basis.

When these standards are met a programme or course is said to be accredited by the BPS.

Registration refers to the individual practitioner and recognising the individual practitioner in meeting the required standards to be registered in their role.

Can I be registered if I work outside the NHS or similar statutory system of care?

It is recognised that these occupations are found in public and private sector organisations. If you are employed in one of the registered roles working in the private sector (for example a private hospital, school or clinic), you must be working in the specified system of care for your role, with provisions for stepped care specified for PWP, CWP and EMHP roles.

For all registered roles this includes working within your field of competence and under appropriate supervision which must be evidenced in your application.

PWPs, CWPs, EMHPs, CAAPs and CAPs are not able to use their registration to practise independently due to the requirements that these occupations must operate within a specified system care under appropriate supervision.

You will not be eligible to register if you do not operate within the defined specified system of care.

Inappropriate use of job title is against the terms of your registration and is likely to result in removal from the register.

What will registration give me?

Registration represents a significant step forward in public protection and in professional recognition of these vital occupations.

It will also provide access to continuing professional development in line with the specific needs of the occupation. It will also give you the benefits of belonging to the body which you are registered with.

For those registering with the BPS that includes The Psychologist magazine, access to conferences and events, reduced fee CPD and the ability to join a wide range of member networks and communities.

What are the BPS doing about registering other psychological practitioner roles that are not-regulated by law?

We are at the very beginning of registration and registering psychological practitioner roles.

The five roles on the Wider Psychological Workforce Register are the first roles we will be registering as they have a course accreditation route which provides a pathway into individual registration as one of the eligibility requirements to register.

For the wellbeing practitioner roles we have ensured close adherence to the national competence frameworks for the roles and this was also a requirement for NHS England recognition of the registration scheme.

We recognise that there are many other routes where competencies are developed and also other psychological practitioner roles outside of the NHS and we will be exploring the possibility of registering other roles in different employment settings that have similarities to the current registered role in terms of the role, population and the settings in which they work.

Whilst we explore and build on our registration for non-regulated roles, we want to ensure that individuals working in the broad range of psychological professional roles are able to have a membership home with the BPS and so the review of our membership grades seeks to include wider psychological professionals, recognising the knowledge, skills and competence of these practitioners and these changes should come in to place in 2022.

Why are these roles not regulated? Does the BPS plan to support these roles to gain HCPC registration?

The decision for regulation of roles rests with the UK Government and is based on the level of potential for harm or risk to patient safety.

Currently, the Government’s preference is for voluntary registration.

Voluntary registers are not regulated by law but the Professional Standards Authority helps to provide a level of assurance by accrediting registers held by professional bodies.

Can I transfer from one role to another on the register?

At present there is not a formal process for transferring from one role to another unless you have undertaken the appropriate training.

Individuals will only be able to register against the role that they have trained for and are currently working in.

There is likely to be further discussions about movement across roles with funding bodies across the four nations and employers in the future.

What if I have qualified and moved on from these roles, can I still register?

Registration is only for individuals currently practising in these roles.

As part of the application process you are required to evidence that you are currently working in the role that you are registering with through the provision of a supervisor reference.

Membership of the society is still available and our Membership Team can help to illustrate the options based on your individual circumstances.

What happens if I train in one nation and move to another nation, would my registration and training be recognised?

Some of the roles on the register are in the workforce across the four nations. For example the PWP role has been established in Northern Ireland and we accredit the training for this role.

Your registration will be recognised in different nations as long as you can evidence that you meet the requirements of working in the specified system of care for the role as described when you join the register and have a supervisor reference as evidence of you working in this specified system of care under supervision.

The CAAP role for example is only established in Scotland and is not a recognised role in the English workforce.

We are hoping that these registration developments will provide recognition for individuals that have trained to work in a particular role and we are working with programme leads to facilitate a way for individuals that have trained in these roles to evidence their competence when applying for roles in a different nation.

Employers will continue to have their own local and national recruitment practices in place and registration is to provide a further layer of governance and assurance for employers that high standards are maintained by individuals in these roles.

Who do I contact with further questions about registration?

For any further questions, please contact [email protected]

Professional standards & education

BPS Accredited Courses

The society is an accrediting body, accrediting education and training programmes in psychology. Accreditation is the means by which the society reaches a view on whether psychology courses are suitable to support students’ achievement of learning outcomes, and are supported by an appropriate resource base.

It ensures that they have studied the required curriculum (whether at undergraduate or postgraduate level) in sufficient breadth and depth. It is the means by which the Society engages in dialogue with providers of psychology education and training, and provides a detailed external review of the provision in question.

The Registration Advisory Panel

The Registration Advisory Panel is a sub-group under the Board of Trustees and has the following role and remit:

  • Provide assurance that competency, safe practice and high standards are maintained for the Wider Psychological Workforce Register and that the register continues to fulfil its objective of public protection.
  • Ensure that voluntary register functions are carried out fairly, effectively, proportionately and transparently and in line with the standards set by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA).
  • Engage with relevant stakeholders and works in partnership with other bodies where appropriate to ensure registrants continue to meet the required standards for entry and maintenance on the WPW Register.

The society is currently recruiting a chair for this panel, and interested parties can view the role details.

For more information on the work of the Registration Advisory Panel please see the Terms of Reference.

About the Professional Standards Authority Accredited Registers Scheme

The British Psychological Society (BPS) Wider Psychological Workforce Register has applied to be an accredited register of the Professional Standards Authority (PSA). The PSA accredits registers so that the public can be confident when using the services provided by health and care practitioners on those registers.

The Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care promotes the health, safety and wellbeing of patients, service users and the public by raising standards of regulation and registration of people working in health and care. It is an independent body, accountable to the UK Parliament, with public protection at the heart of everything they do.

The PSA oversee regulators who register health and care professionals working in regulated professions and therefore regulate the Health and Care professions Council (HCPC) who are responsible for regulating practitioner psychologists.

The PSA also independently assess and accredit other organisations who register practitioners whose roles are not regulated by law, working both within and outside the NHS.  Those organisations that meet the PSA standards are awarded with a quality mark, demonstrating commitment to the health, wellbeing and safety of the public. The accredited registers scheme covers a number of psychological professions including: Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners, Children’s Wellbeing Practitioners, Education Mental Health Practitioners, Clinical Associated in Applied Psychology (in Scotland) and Clinical Associates in Psychology.

Voluntary registration with a register that is approved by the PSA is the approach that is taken with many health and care professional roles that are not subject to statutory regulation to ensure oversight of practitioners in those roles for the protection of the public.

BPS as a professional body

The BPS is a registered charity which acts as the representative body for psychology and psychologists in the UK, and is responsible for the promotion of excellence and ethical practice in the science, education and application of the discipline.

BPS as an accrediting body

The society is an accrediting body, accrediting education and training programmes in psychology. Accreditation is the means by which the society reaches a view on whether psychology courses are suitable to support students’ achievement of learning outcomes, and are supported by an appropriate resource base. It ensures that they have studied the required curriculum (whether at undergraduate or postgraduate level) in sufficient breadth and depth. It is the means by which the Society engages in dialogue with providers of psychology education and training, and provides a detailed external review of the provision in question. The standards for accreditation reflect the requirements necessary for membership of the Society at particular levels and for entry on to the Wider Psychological Workforce Register.

BPS as a registering body

The society holds a number of directories and registers that members can apply to join. Our directories enable members to advertise their services and our registers enable members to highlight their training and experience in particular areas and gain recognition of their knowledge skills and competence. 

Registration with the Wider Psychological Workforce Register demonstrates a psychological professional’s commitment to their area of practice and demonstrates that they have the necessary knowledge, skills and experience to practice. They are part of a professional community that works to high standards, policies and codes of conduct and practice.  For employers, registration gives confidence that competency, high standards and safe practice are maintained through a code of practise and continuing professional development. It also shows that the individual is committed to developing themselves professionally. Some employers such as the NHS require registration as a condition of employment.

For patients and the public it helps them to feel confident that the psychological professional they see is competent, trustworthy and maintaining high standards. It ensures that action is taken to protect them from risk by managing complaints and fitness to practise concerns as part of a government backed scheme to protect the public.

As the society is the accrediting body for the training programmes for each of the roles on the register and also offers individual registration for these roles conflicts of interest are carefully managed within each Committee and Board to ensure openness, transparency and appropriate management. The accreditation and registration processes and procedures are managed by distinct teams. Find out more about our governance.

Regulation and Registration

The Health and Care professions Council (HCPC) is the UK regulator for psychologists and protects nine titles of psychologist: Clinical Psychologist, Counselling Psychologist, Educational Psychologist, Forensic Psychologist, Health Psychologist, Occupational Psychologist, Sport and Exercise Psychologist, Registered Psychologist and Practitioner Psychologist.

There are a number of psychological professional roles that are not regulated by law, and therefore not regulated by the HCPC, including the roles listed on the society’s Wider Psychological Workforce Register. Voluntary registration with a register that is approved by the PSA is the approach that is taken with many health and care professional roles that are not subject to statutory regulation to ensure oversight of practitioner in those unregulated roles for the protection of the public.

What is a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner?

Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners (PWPs) are trained to assess and support people who are experiencing common mental health problems – primarily anxiety disorders and depression – in the self-management of their recovery.

PWPs do this through the provision of information and using a range of low-intensity, evidence-based interventions, mainly informed by cognitive-behavioural principles. Treatment can be delivered on the telephone, online or through face-to-face sessions.

PWPs normally operate within a stepped care service delivery model, such as Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services in England. Stepped care operates on the principle of offering the least intrusive most effective treatment in the first instance; patients can then be ‘stepped up’ to a more intensive treatment if required. In the IAPT service delivery model, PWPs provide care at ‘step 2’ of the stepped care model supporting low-intensity interventions. They work alongside high-intensity workers and other clinicians delivering cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and other evidence-based ‘step 3’ treatments.

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance for common mental health disorders and for each of the anxiety disorders and depression sets out the range of different types of low-intensity evidence based interventions appropriate for delivery by PWPs.

In order to register as a PWP the applicant must:

  • Have completed a BPS accredited PWP training programme – these are programmes that met the Standards for the accreditation of psychological wellbeing practitioner training programmes or for those currently employed as a PWP in an IAPT service who do not hold a recognised PWP qualification, a certificate of completion of the Health Education England PWP Competency Assessment scheme.
  • Operate within a clearly identified stepped-care pathway such as an IAPT service under supervision
  • Be receiving at least 1 hour per week of individual Clinical Case Management Supervision and on average 1 hour per fortnight of Clinical Skills Supervision
  • Have at least six months of experience working in the specified system of care.

There are circumstances where PWPs operate outside of an IAPT service, for example, services based outside of England that do not have an IAPT model or within a private healthcare service.

PWPs are not independent practitioners which means that to register they need to work within a stepped care model of service delivery under supervision. All appropriately qualified and supervised

PWPs across all four nations can register with the BPS as long as they meet the requirements for registration, working within a stepped care model of service delivery.

Training requirements for PWPs

PWP training duration is 45 days and normally distributed over 9 to 12 months. Trainees will normally be employed in a trainee PWP role for the duration of their training. The PWP qualification

is at level 6 resulting in the award of a Graduate Certificate or at level 7 resulting in the award of a

Postgraduate Certificate. There is also a level 6 apprenticeship route for people without a degree but with useful life experience, or who’d like to make a career change to contribute to the local community.

Qualified PWPs

PWPs can work full or part time. Working in the NHS trainee PWPs work at Agenda for Change band 4 and after qualifying work at band 5. To find more about the agenda for change process and pay bands please click here: link

What is a Clinical Associate in Applied Psychology (Scotland)?

Clinical Associates in Applied Psychology (CAAPs) are specialist mental health professionals whose duties include delivering psychological assessments, formulations, interventions, evaluation and research.

They work as a member of a team delivering psychological services with clients within specified ranges of conditions and age, either in primary care/adult mental health settings or in a range of areas involving children, young people, and their families.

CAAPs work as independent clinicians in a circumscribed way with a defined range and severity of problems experienced by a particular client group, knowing when to consult with senior colleagues under whose support and supervision they practise and where limits of expertise are recognised, make appropriate referral to a chartered clinical psychologist. The level of clinical responsibility a CAAP has is decided by the employing Health Board which takes in to account the nature of the service and the local arrangements.

CAAPs work under the supervision of a clinical psychologist or in circumstances judged appropriate by the Health Board Professional Lead for Psychology, may be delegated to other applied psychologists or CAAPs with two years post qualification experience and the relevant supervision training.

The CAAP role is specific to Scotland and was established in 2006 to address significant challenges in improving access to mental health services.

The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) sets out the evidence base used by psychological professionals including CAAPs. There is a strong evidence base, recognised in SIGN guidelines, for the effectiveness of psychological interventions in achieving positive health outcomes.

Training requirements of CAAPs

To train as a CAAP individuals must have completed a BPS accredited undergraduate degree (or conversion course) in psychology and then complete a year of training at Masters level (level 7 in England, Northern Ireland and Wales; level 11 in Scotland) in either Psychological Therapies in Primary Care or Applied Psychology for Children and Young People.

Qualified CAAPs

Qualified CAAPs are specialist mental health professionals. NHS Education for Scotland has a Framework of four types of psychological practice and CAAPs are at the top level of this framework, offering specialist psychological practice. This means they deliver specialist psychological therapies based on case formulation or psychological therapies based on case formulations drawn on a range of models. They enhance the clinical skill mix available in psychological services working alongside other professionals delivering specialist psychological practice (e.g. Clinical Psychologists and Cognitive Behavioural Therapists)

Working in the NHS trainee CAAPs work at Agenda for Change band 6 and after qualifying work at band 7.  

The Scottish subject benchmark statement for applied psychology (clinical associate) Scotland, provides further information about the core skills of a CAAP which are:

  • Assessment
  • Formulation
  • Intervention
  • Evaluation and research
  • Communication
  • Self-management

The scope of practise of CAAPs is circumscribed to working with specific client groups within pre-established protocols. The training provides qualified CAAPs with secure foundation for the range of skills and knowledge necessary to carry out the activities outlined above. Further skills and knowledge should be developed thorough continuing professional development appropriate to the specific employment pathways.

Requirements for registration

In order to be registered on the Wider Psychological Workforce Register CAAPs must:

  • Be a Graduate member (MBPsS) of the society. Find out more about membership.
  • Have completed a BPS accredited CAAP training programme - these are programmes that meet the Standards for the accreditation of applied psychology programmes for Associate Psychologists
  • Be currently employed as a CAAP working with the population they have trained to work with (adults or children and young people) under supervision.
  • Be receiving fortnightly clinical supervision (pro rata for a full time member of staff).
  • Have at least six months of experience working as a CAAP within the population they have trained to work with.

What is a Clinical Associate in Psychology?

Clinical Associates in Psychology (CAPs) are accountable mental health professionals whose duties include delivering evidence-based psychological assessments, formulations, interventions and research under the supervision of a Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registered practitioner psychologist.

CAPs work with a specific population, supporting people who have long-standing and complex difficulties.

CAPs practice autonomously with appropriate support, working with populations across the lifespan from different backgrounds, cultures and beliefs. They work in community mental health teams, hospitals or inpatient settings, secure of medium secure mental health setting and in specialist mental health settings. They are trained to work with specific populations and therefore provide a more circumscribed range of activities than HCPC registered practitioner psychologists. They understand how to assess limits of professional boundaries and when to seek appropriate advice on practice and whom to refer to so as to ensure the best care. The level of clinical responsibility a CAP has is decided by the employing NHS Trust which takes in to account the nature of the service and the local arrangements.

The CAP role was developed in England and is a new occupation, introduced as part of a programme of work to provide greater access to psychologically informed mental health services, developed via an apprenticeship framework.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) sets out the evidence base used by psychological professionals including CAPs. CAPs work is informed, but not wholly determined, by problem-specific treatment protocols. CAPs work can involve working with populations where the evidence base is not fully established, using psychological theory to share and evaluate novel interventions.

Training requirements of CAPs

To train as a CAP individuals must have completed a BPS accredited undergraduate degree (or conversion course) in psychology giving them “Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership”. Training then involves the completion of a level 7 degree apprenticeship hosted by an employer, such as an NHS trust, alongside training on a university validated degree programme. The CAP apprenticeship is an eighteen-month full-time training programme divided between work-based experience (up to 4 days per week) and academic teaching and study, which leads to a Masters qualification level (level 7 in England, Northern Ireland and Wales; level 11 in Scotland). 

Qualified CAPs

Qualified CAPs are skilled professional applied psychologists. They are accountable professionals, responsible for managing their own caseload, whilst the supervising HCPC registered practitioner psychologists retains overall clinical responsibility for their work. 

Working in the NHS trainee CAPs work at Agenda for Change band 5 and after qualifying work at band 6.

The apprenticeship standard provides further information about the knowledge, skills and behaviours of a CAP along with the duties that they carry out in their role.

The scope of practise of a CAP is circumscribed to working with the specific populations that they are trained to work with. The training provides qualified CAPs with a secure foundation for the range of skills and knowledge necessary to carry out the duties of their role. Further skills and knowledge should be developed thorough continuing professional development appropriate to the specific employment pathways and CAPs can complete additional training if they wish to work with different populations to which they were originally trained.

Requirements for registration

In order to be registered on the Wider Psychological Workforce Register CAPs must:

Concerns and complaints

What if the person I am looking for does not appear on the WPW Register?

If the person you are looking for is not listed on the WPW Register, then this usually means that they have not met the criteria for being on the register.

If the individual you are searching for is a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP), Children’s Wellbeing Practitioner (CWP) or Education Mental Health Practitioner (EMHP) it could be that they are registered with The British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) who are also a registering body for these professionals.

Visit BABCP’s website to search their register.

It may be the case that the person concerned is a student or in the process of applying to the register, but their training or application is not yet complete.

If a serious complaint has been raised against a registrant they may be suspended from the register whilst an investigation takes place. If any complaint is upheld after investigation, the registrant may be removed from the register or their register entry may be changed to denote the existence or outcome of a complaint. The society publishes a list of sanctioned registrants with a short summary description of complaints, and any sanctions applied, on the website for public information.

There are rare instances where a registrant’s details may not be published on the WPW Register. This will be in exceptional circumstances related to the registrant’s safety, when publishing their name may put them at risk.

Concerns about a WPW registrant

The Wider Psychological Workforce (WPW) Register is a register of individuals in psychological practitioner roles that are not regulated by law.

It is a voluntary register which means that psychological practitioners on the register have chosen to join the register, in order to show their commitment to their area of practice and to giving good and safe care. Registrants have agreed to co-operate with investigations when concerns are raised about their practice.

For the Wider Psychological Workforce Register, the society will investigate issues relating to the fitness to practise of registrants in line with its objective of maintaining public protection.

Informal resolution

Where possible we encourage informal resolution of concerns. We ask that if you have a complaint about a registrant that you tell the registrant first, or their employer. This will give them the chance to put things right and is usually the quickest way to resolve the matter. If you think the matter is too serious for this, or if you do not feel comfortable taking that route, or if you have tried that but your complaint is still not resolved, then you should make your complaint to the Society.

Making a complaint

If you wish to make a complaint against someone who is on the Wider Psychological Workforce Register, please complete Wider Psychological Workforce (WPW) Register Concerns Form.

Anonymous complaints

We can consider an anonymous complaint where we can independently verify that the issue you raise is true – for example the existence of a criminal conviction or outcome from another professional body or regulator, or where the matter that you are complaining about is in the public domain.”

We would not normally pursue a complaint against a registrant where the complainant does not disclose their identity to us. This is because the registrant has to be able to respond the complaint, and needs to know who is complaining to be able to do that.

If we decide that it is in the public interest to proceed with an anonymous complaint, then we will do so, but these occasions will be rare. If we do decide to consider your complaint anonymously, you need to know that giving the registrant the detail of the case may mean that they are able to identify who is complaining.

Group complaints

You can submit a complaint as a group of people who are all affected by the same issue. If this is the case, please choose someone from the group to act as a representative for the group, so that we have one consistent person to communicate with during the process, and you should tell us that you are acting on behalf of a group.

Your confidentiality

We will only use this information to investigate your concerns, and we will anonymise it where possible. Depending on the issue, it might not be possible to investigate effectively and maintain confidentiality, or it may not be in your best interests or those of the Society. If this is the case, we will explain the situation to you and tell you who we think we should share the information with.

Your personal data will be protected within the requirements of the current Data Protection laws and regulations and the Society’s compliance policy.

Our procedures, information and guidance

Please find further information about our procedures in the WPW Register Complaints Procedure.

Where the matter is not about fitness to practise, we may still consider a complaint about a registrant under our Member Conduct Rules

If you can’t find what you need, please contact the Fitness to Practise Team by emailing us at [email protected] or phoning us on 0116 252 9919

How we can support you

We understand that it can be upsetting and stressful for everyone when a concern is raised and we want to do what we can to reduce this where possible whilst remaining in line with our objective of maintaining public protection.

We will support complainants and registrants by being clear about what will happen at each stage of our investigation process. We do not take the side of the complainant or of the registrant in handling complaints. We are impartial and we work to find out what has happened and to find a fair resolution that ensures pubic protection.

If you would like to speak to someone in our Complaints Team who can explain how the process works and answer any further questions you have please emails us at [email protected] or phone us on 0116 252 9919.

Advice and support from other organisations

There are a number of organisations who may be able to advise you about your concern

England

Scotland

Wales

Northern Ireland

Advice and support for your wellbeing:

Contact details

You can email us at [email protected]

Alternatively, you can write to us at:

  • The British Psychological Society St Andrews House 48 Princess Road East Leicester LE1 7DR

Or if these methods don’t suit you, you can call us and talk to someone who will be happy to discuss your individual needs. Please use our dedicated complaints line: 0116 252 9919.