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Division of Occupational Psychology

The Division of Occupational Psychology exists to promote the professional interests of occupational psychologists and to support the development of psychology both as a profession and as a body of knowledge and skills.

Our mission

The Division of Occupational Psychology (DOP) promotes the professional interests of occupational psychologists and those in training in the United Kingdom (UK).

It provides a home, a champion, a source of support and development for occupational psychologists and trainee occupational psychologists (TOPs)

Visit the DOP devolved nations pages:
Division of Occupational Psychology

Find out more about the DOP

Division of Occupational Psychology

For our members

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Division of Occupational Psychology

Join our IRIS community!

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Our current priorities

Review of DOP roles, structures and groups

To promote:

  • diversity and inclusion
  • alignment with strategic priorities and needs
  • governance/ accountability
  • member benefit
  • attention to the main areas of occupational psychology

We have:

  • Implemented a new committee structure
  • Reviewed all DOP groups and outputs
  • Developed new a new structure for all DOP groups (working groups, sub-committees) [insert link to news page item]

And are:

  • Reviewing representational roles to the DOP committee
  • Identifying existing and potential collaborations and MOUs

View the redrawn map of new DOP groups.

Review of DOP strategy

We will implement a new DOP Strategic plan following adoption of the BPS interim strategy

Equality, diversity, and inclusion

The DOP is committed to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and we aim to embed EDI across all our DOP activities

We have appointed a Task and Finish Group to advise and make recommendations for implementation to the DOP Committee.

Support for our trainees and prospective trainees (Stage 1 and Stage 2)

We are working hard to

  • better understand the needs of our trainees and develop solutions that support these needs
  • develop positive working relationship with the QOP Board and represent trainee needs in BPS Stakeholder forums

To achieve these goals we have:

  • introduced dedicated committee roles for Education and Training, and Trainee Occupational Psychologists (TOPs)
  • been meeting regularly as a Careers, Education, Development and Training Sub-group (CEDT)
  • introduced Stage 2 networking events
  • reached out to MSc course directors
  • planned new activities for 2022 to engage with MSc students and TOPs

Re-design and re-launch of our divisional periodical

We are preparing to launch a new DOP publication Occupational Psychology Outlook (OPO).

As a peer reviewed publication and a key benefit for almost 4000 divisional members, it will

  • provide a bridge between research and practice, bringing the two together in a single publication that contains research and conceptual papers, practitioner papers, review papers and a range of other content
  • cover the five subject domains of occupational psychology, as well as ethics and professional skills
  • highlight hot topics and trends
  • publish evidence of best practice and content that is relevant for learning, continuing development, and professional standards
  • enable new and established authors to publish, and generate opportunities for others as reviewers and editorial board members
  • publish content about careers and celebrate success, reporting noteworthy developments within the division and the profession
  • create space for opinion along with a right to reply from different perspectives

Member engagement and research

We strive to better understand the needs and interests of all our members so that we can be responsive, aligning deliverables and benefits based on the best available evidence of needs and interests. Activities to support this include, the New Voices Stakeholder Panel, Networking events; Townhall Sessions; Chair Surgeries.

The introduction of IRIS, DOP’s on-line community, in May 2022 will also benefit two-way communication between the DOP Committee and members.

Participation in society reviews

We have contributed feedback to the BPS Member Grades Review and encourage members to take part in society consultations.

Through our Practice Board and Senate representation, we have provided feedback on other reviews, e.g.m the review of the member conduct rules and the member network review.

Ongoing areas of work for the division

Research and public policy

Includes:

  • Active representation at and engagement with BPS Research Board
  • Active engagement with BPS Public Affairs. Identification and follow-up of opportunities to influence public policy

Professional development

Includes:

  • Identifying, supporting, promoting and delivering activities and products relating to on-going CPD requirements for professional registration (e.g., safeguarding, supervision, mentoring, etc)

Career development

Includes:

  • Identifying, supporting, promoting and delivering activities and products relating to on-going career development post-qualification

Education, training, and trainees

Includes:

  • Identifying, responding to needs and opportunities across the educational spectrum
  • Participating in stakeholder activities within the BPS
  • Supporting activity in relation to QOP stage 1 and stage 2

Events

Supports delivery of objectives for all of the above and includes:

  • DOP Webinar Programme
  • Conference Provision
  • Collaborations
  • Other event opportunities

Resources

Engage and change: occupational psychologists facilitating corporate responsibility

This report sets out the findings from our survey and a framework for applying psychology to CR. It pulls together examples of models, theories and practice to apply to CR.

The report is designed to support CR and sustainability professionals and to promote the science and practice of OPs. The focus is therefore on sharing ideas and information of relevance to professionals in any sector, demonstrating the work that OPs do to enable organisations to develop.

By doing this we aim to help professionals identify priorities, establish common principles and approaches and identify opportunities for specific, crosscutting or systems-based solutions, based on the evidence base of behavioural research and insight.

Going Green: The Psychology of Sustainability in the Workplace

This report draws together a range of research and case studies which were developed as part of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Occupational Psychology Going Green Symposium held in London in 2010.

Its aim is to provide an illustration of the important contribution that the field of work and organisational psychology can make to understanding and promoting green behaviour in the workplace.

This first introductory chapter outlines what is in the other chapters, reflecting on their key messages and summarising some of the issues which they individually and collectively raise.

The report contains a range of useful material for ‘people specialists’ in organisations, including a number of vignettes and case studies particularly aimed at practitioners, alongside the sorts of theoretical material and research results you would expect from the specialist area of occupational psychology which applies the science of psychology to the workplace.

Psychological assessment of adults with specific performance difficulties at work

These guidelines were developed in order to promote good practice in the psychological assessment of those individuals whose behaviour in the workplace reflects inconsistencies between what is expected of them and their performance.

That is, those who have dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, ADD/ADHD and ASD. They are sometimes referred to as being neuro-diverse, but more commonly as having specific learning difficulties.

In recognition of the fact that the concern here is with the workplace rather than educational settings, and that most will have learned differently but effectively, the term ‘performance difficulties’ is used.

Psychology of Health and Wellbeing

This document is a series of information sheets designed to provide an introduction to the area of health and well-being at work from the perspective of Occupational Psychology.

It is aimed initially at an Occupational Psychology audience as a means of orienting fellow professionals to this domain of practice and research. 

This White Paper is intended to provide a succinct and a perspective on the role of psychological well-being at work, including an indication of the costs/benefits of psychological well-being and guidance on how to improve psychological well-being at work. 

The Design and Development of Assessment Centres Standard

This standard defines good practice and provides guidance on best practice in employing Assessment Centre methodology to deliver Assessment and Development Centres in work related contexts.

Good practice reflects a minimum acceptable standard of practice and is identified by ‘shall’ in the standard; best practice is an aspirational level of practice identified by ‘should’ in the standard.

Delivery of disability support assessments for adults during Covid-19 lockdown

This interim position paper covers the use of diagnostic testing for dyslexia, developmental coordination disorder, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, non-verbal learning disabilities, processing speed/working memory deficit and applied (non-clinical) assessment of ADHD, during the Covid-19 lockdown.

Read the full paper on disability support assessments for adults during Covid-19 lockdown.

Wellbeing at work: a guide for occupational psychology practitioners

The purpose of this document is to provide a guide to good practice on how to develop and deliver comprehensive workplace health and wellbeing programmes.

Those in training to become occupational psychologists, newly qualified occupational psychologists; Experienced occupational psychologists who are new to the topic of wellbeing.

Download the wellbeing at work guide for occupational psychology practitioners (sign-in required).

Journals

Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology

he Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the British Psychological Society.

Society Members can access all our current and archived BPS Journals (plus 32 Wiley-Blackwell publications) for free via PsychSource, and are able to subscribe to hard copies of the Journals.

Reports and papers

Access to Work: Support for Hidden Disabilities

This position has been produced by the Neurodiversity and Employment Working Group of the Division of Occupational Psychology.

The concerns and challenges of working in the field of occupational psychology

The purpose of this report is to provide evidence from members of the DOP and key individuals in the field around challenges and concerns they have working in the OP field both now and in the future.

The report also highlights suggested solutions by members to these challenges and concerns. It is the hope of this report that the presented findings will be used to develop key action points for each committee.

Publications

Occupational Psychology Outlook

Occupational Psychology Outlook (OPO) is a peer-reviewed publication of the Division of Occupational Psychology, being launched in 2022.

OPO aims to:

  • provide a bridge between research and practice, bringing the two together in a single publication that contains research and conceptual papers, practitioner papers, review papers and a range of other content
  • cover the five subject domains of occupational psychology, as well as ethics and professional skills
  • highlight hot topics and trends
  • publish evidence of best practice and content that is relevant for learning, continuing development, and professional standards
  • enable new and established authors to publish, and generate opportunities for others as reviewers and editorial board members
  • publish content about careers and celebrate success, reporting noteworthy developments within the division and the profession
  • create space for opinion along with a right to reply from different perspectives

Find out more about Occupational Psychology Outlook.

Past publications

OP Matters

OP Matters welcomes contributions which are original , authoritative and of interest to our members. 

Learn more about OP Matters.

Work - Life Balance Bulletin

The Work-Life Balance Bulletin is a bi-annual newsletter produced by the DOP’s Work-Life Balance Working Group.

Learn more about the Work-Life Balance Bulletin.

Careers

Occupational Psychology is the application of the science of psychology to work.

Occupational psychologists develop, apply and evaluate a range of tools and interventions across many different areas of the workplace, including:

  • Leadership, motivation and engagement
  • Learning, training and development
  • Psychological assessment
  • Wellbeing at work
  • Work design, organisational change and development

Occupational psychologists use psychological theories and approaches to deliver tangible benefits by enhancing the effectiveness of organisations and developing the performance, motivation and wellbeing of people in the workplace.

Download the Occupational Psychology Careers booklet

For more information email [email protected]

Qualification in Occupational Psychology (Stage 2)

The Qualification in Occupational Psychology (Stage 2) is the independent route to training as an occupational psychologist.

It enables you to undertake your training while you are working in the field and acquiring valuable practical experience in a range of settings.

Learn more about the qualification

Awards

Nominations are now open for the DOP 2022 Awards.

The new streamlined awards structure aims to reflect the full range of experience in occupational psychology.

There are four categories:

  1. Excellence in Occupational Psychology – “Student”

    Aimed at recognising students who have demonstrated excellence in their studies.  It is anticipated that most nominations will be on the basis of a dissertation research project, but nominations could also be made on the basis of significant contributions to the student community, engagement with professional bodies

    To encourage students to become part of the DOP Community this award is open to DOP members and non-members.

  2. Excellence in Occupational Psychology – “Early career”

    This category is aimed at recognising those who are new to occupational psychology* (not necessarily early in the individual’s career history). This includes those who are engaged in doctoral level qualifications (such as a PhD or Stage 2) and those who are within five years of qualification (e.g. PhD or Chartership).   An award may be made based on evidence from research, practice, teaching or policy impact, or a combination of two or more of these.

    Please note: to be eligible for nomination you must be a DOP member.

  3. Excellence in Occupational Psychology – “Experienced”

    This category is aimed at recognising those who are more established within their occupational psychology* career, whether they are practitioners, academics, or a mix of the two. An award may be made based on evidence from research, practice, teaching or policy impact, or a combination of two or more of these.

    Please note: to be eligible for nomination you must be a DOP member.

  4. Outstanding contribution to Occupational Psychology

    This category is aimed at recognising those who have made a significant and  sustained contribution. An award may be made based on evidence from research, practice, teaching or policy impact, or a combination of two or more of these. 

    To recognise and celebrate outstanding contributions, this award is open to DOP members and non-members.

Key points about the awards:

  • Candidates can be either an individual or a team
  • Candidates may be self-nominated or nominated by others
  • More than one award can be made in each category during a given year
  • An award may be made in categories 2-4 based on evidence of a candidate’s research, practice, teaching or policy impact, or a combination of two or more of these.

The deadline for nominations is midday on 30 September 2022.

Submit a nomination

Information about the awards

The awards are intended to reflect the full range of experience within the Division of Occupational Psychology.

Our principle is that we are not seeking to recognise the best individual each year, but that we are recognising good to great practice within our professional community.

More than one award can be made in each category during a given year.

Nominations should focus on a single coherent piece of work as a narrative, although this may draw from multiple projects, consultations, etc.  For example, a candidate might submit on the basis of an impactful approach to enhancing careers, even if the examples come from work with three different organisations.  Similarly, a candidate might submit on the basis of an important research project consisting of multiple studies.  In the case of student and early career candidates we would anticipate a single project, consultation etc. to be the basis.

Preparing your nomination

Nominations, to be submitted by Questback,  must include the following::

A summary – up to 500 words - of what was done, how it was done, and what the outcomes were.

Organisations or individuals involved must not be named unless the candidate has explicit permission.

Subsequent sections of the application will enable the candidate to present more detail and demonstrate how criteria are met (each section will correspond to one of the areas of criteria). It should be clear who the beneficiaries are (these may be multiple, e.g., employees, organisations, local communities).

Say how the following criteria have been met:

  •   Rigour – up to 500 words
  •   Impact – up to 500 words
  •   Ethics – up to 500 words
  •   Originality/ innovation – up to 500 words

 An  Appendix with  supporting evidence, e.g., client testimonials, published reports, referee testimonials. These can be attached before submission.

Criteria

Rigour

This criterion reflects the extent to which the work demonstrates high standards in occupational psychology.  In practice or teaching this will reflect demonstrating evidence-based approaches to projects, systematic decisions to enhance outcomes, and (potentially) adjustments made to changing circumstances.  In research this will reflect methodological quality, including research design, data collection, and appropriate analysis.  In broader contributions to the community, this will provide a critical discussion of the approach taken, and what steps were taken to perform the task well.

Impact

This criterion focuses on the outcomes of the work.  Regardless of the candidate’s background, areas to consider are: knowledge (what of significance was learned?), working lives (e.g. is wellbeing, performance, or career progression improved for individuals?), organisational outcomes (e.g. productivity), policy (e.g. has institutional – e.g. government – policy changed as a result of work, advice, etc. delivered by the candidate?), the profession (e.g. has occupational psychology been promoted with stakeholders?).  Candidates may use multiple areas of impact but are encouraged to focus on those that they can demonstrate more clearly.

Ethics

This criterion reflects the demonstration of ethical standards and professional values, as set out in BPS guidance.  Performance in this criterion is dependent on showing how issues were anticipated/ identified and managed, and how unanticipated ethical issues were identified.  Stating that there were no ethical issues to be considered will attract a score of ‘0.’

Originality

This criterion reflects the extent to which the candidate has made a contribution to knowledge or practice. This might include producing new knowledge (e.g., in research), applying an established method to a new context, developing a new kind of intervention, etc.  Candidates are encouraged to treat this criterion as flexible (it might apply to any aspect of the work) and to consider that all work is based on what has come before – and therefore originality is likely to be incremental.

 

Previous award winners

Academic Contribution to Practice

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2017 Jonathan Passmore 
2016 Dr Rachel Travers
2015 Professor David Guest
2014 Professor Rob Briner
2013 Professor Fiona Patterson
2011 Adrian Furnham
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Lifetime Achievement Award

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2017 No Award
2016 Professor Victor Dulowicz
2015 Dr David Bartram
2014 Chris Lewis
2013 Professor Clive Fletcher
2012 Pat Lindley
2011 John Toplis
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Practitioner of the Year

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2017 Antonia Dietman
2016 Dr Balissa Greene
2015 Hannah Markson (nee Walker)
2014 Kate Firth
2013 Emma Donaldson-Feilder & Rachel Lewis
2012 Kate Bonsall-Clarke
2011 Laura Empey
2010 Ingrid Covington
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Recognition of Excellence

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2013 Nancy Doyle
2011 Vicki Ashworth
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Student Prizes for Excellence

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2017 Charlotte Hermans
2016

Kathryn Pimblett

Nicola Paget

Rachel Driver

2015

Emma Donaldson-Fielder

Julie Jebson

Rachel Lewis

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Volunteer of the Year

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2017 No Award
2016

Dr Almuth McDowell

Dr Gail Kinman

Jonathan Cox

2015 Dr Almuth McDowall
2013 Emma Donaldson-Fielder
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2018 Award Winners

Student Prizes for Excellence in Occupational Psychology (Head Judge – Dr Richard Kwiatkowski) 

Winner: 1st place, Emily Kitson, 2nd place, Thomas Harding

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Practice Early Career (Head Judge – Julie Freeborn)

Winner: Hoda Hussein

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Research Early Career (Head Judge – Dr Angela Carter)

Winner: Dr Victoria Elsey

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Practice (Head Judge – Binna Kandola)

Winner: Sophie Seex Shortlisted - Gail Steptoe-Warren, Professor Fiona Patterson

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Research (Head Judge – Professor Rob Briner)

Winner: Dr Claire Hardy

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Policy Impact (Head Judge – Nick Pahl)

Winner: Dr Nancy Doyle

Long-term Active Service (Head Judge – Nicola Gale)

Winner: Kisane Prutton

Lifetime Contribution to Occupational Psychology (Head Judge – Dr Pat Lindley)

Winner:  Dr Angela Carter

2019 Award Winners

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Research Early Career (Head Judge – Dr Angela Carter)

Winner: Dr Kevin Teoh

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Practice (Head Judge – Amanda Potter) Winner: Dr Hazel McLaughlin & Helen Ives, Second prize Deborah Tom

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Research (Head Judge – Professor Rob Briner) Winner: Rachel Lewis & Team (Christian Ferragamo, Jo Yarker, Kai Britt-Boschmann and Emma Donaldson-Feilder)

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Policy Impact (Head Judge – Nick Pahl) Winner: Dr Ashley Weinberg

Long-term Active Service Recognition (non-competitive) Karen Royle, Sharon De Mascia, Rob Goate and Carole Watling

Lifetime Contribution to Occupational Psychology (Head Judge – Dr Pat Lindley)  Winner:  Shelly Rubinstein

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Practice Team (Head Judge – Fiona Patterson) Winner: TMP Worldwide (Kate Bradley Team Lead – Dean Kempton, Rakhee Sudra, Kirsty Nolan and Susuana Laranjeiro)

Student Prizes for Excellence in Occupational Psychology (Head Judge – Dr Richard Kwiatkowski)  No prize awarded for 2019

Excellence in Occupational Psychology Practice Early Career (Head Judge – Angie Ingman) No nominations received for 2019

Committee members

Janet Fraser - Chair

Janet is a Chartered Psychologist and an HCPC registered Occupational Psychologist.

Prior to becoming Chair of the division, she was Chair of DOP Scotland serving two terms in this role. In March 2020 she was invited to lead the Working Differently Workstream which developed public-facing guidance as part of the BPS Covid-19 Response. Janet represents the division at BPS Senate and is a member of the BPS Practice Board. She is also a member of the Practice Board HCPC sub-group, the Workforce Planning Advisory Standing Committee and the BPS Network Review Reference Group

Psychology is a second career for Janet made possible through studying at the Open University and then Birkbeck, University of London. She was able to complete her qualification in occupational psychology while working for the NHS in a role that focused on improving policy and practice for dignity at work and management of stress at work. She subsequently set up her own consultancy.

Janet has been trained in mediation and has an interest in organisational fairness and constructive approaches to workplace conflict. Evidence-based practice is a long-standing interest for her, and she has facilitated learning opportunities for DOP members on topics such as supervision, professional identity and mental health at work.

In her BPS roles, she continues to be active in encouraging collaboration between different domains of psychology and her ambitions for occupational psychology include reducing and, if possible, removing barriers to qualification and supporting new opportunities that allow candidates to reach their potential.

Noreen Tehrani - Deputy Chair / Professional Development Lead

Noreen has had a varied career working as a medical researcher, retail operations director and as a senior manager for a public organisation managing a team of 100 professional staff to provide psycho-social support for 200,000 employees.

She formed her own organisation in 1997 to assist organisations and employees to maximise their effectiveness and efficiency.

Noreen has combined her commercial, psychological and counselling knowledge and experience to develop an approach to supporting employees, which meets the needs of both the organisation and the employees.

Noreen understands organisations and business and uses this commercial approach to develop ethical products and services which meet the needs of the organisation for which she works. She is passionate about her work and constantly looks for ways to improve what she does.

Noreen has written many articles, papers and book chapters including two books on trauma, Workplace Trauma- concepts, assessments and interventions and Managing Trauma in the Workplace. She has also written two books on Workplace Bullying.

Noreen is the Deputy Chair of the Division of Occupational Psychology and past Chair of the Crisis, Disaster and Trauma Section of the BPS.

Andrew Clements - Honorary Treasurer

Dr Andrew Clements is the Honorary Treasurer for DOP.

He is an Occupational Psychologist registered with the HCPC, employed as a Lecturer in Work Psychology by Aston University.

His research focuses on wellbeing at work and career behaviours.

He has engaged in consultancy and applied research with organisations across a range of sectors, including policing, prison, housing, consultancy, and charity.

Christine Hamilton - Honorary Secretary

Christine Hamilton is an experienced leadership & management development consultant.

She has experience working in public, private, and not for profit sectors, and works as an associate of a number of OD organisations and as an independent psychologist.

She has held Head of OD roles in a number of public sector organisations and also been a Leadership Development Consultant with a national remit. She is a registered Coach with NHS Education for Scotland and as such undertakes GP and director level coaching within the NHS, other parts of the public sector and a range of financial and legal organisations.

Christine is Secretary to the DOP and Chair of the Special Group of Independent Practitioners.

Her current projects include:

  1. "Team Based Working" using evidence-based diagnostics and development toolkits and materials
  2. In Depth Development Assessments to enable focus upon individual's signature strengths in the private sector
  3. Leadership Development Programmes (including for aspiring Heads of Clinical Psychology departments within NHS Scotland)
  4. Transitions Programmes, for individuals undergoing large personal change in work and/ or having to lead others through major transitions

Christeen George - Education and Training Lead

Dr Christeen George has worked as an internal consultant, a researcher, a university lecturer and a business consultant.

She has also taught in Cross River State in Nigeria.

She is a Chartered Psychologist and a registered Occupational Psychologist and is a member of the British Psychological Society’s Presidential Taskforce on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and is the Education and Training Lead on the Division of Occupational Psychology Committee.

She has managed and delivered research projects in many large organisations. Her publications include a book on ‘The Psychological Contract’ and work on the retention of professional workers.

Her recent practitioner experience includes the encouragement of responsible gambling, team building with staff in a special school, and the development of an instrument to evaluate the effectiveness of Continuing Professional Development courses within the NHS.

She also ran the MSc in Occupational Psychology at the University of Hertfordshire until her retirement. More recently she has conducted workshops on ‘Decolonising the curriculum’ and has published several blogs including ‘Don’t call me BAME’.

Lorraine Falvey - Trainee Occupational Psychologist Lead / Careers Development Lead

Lorraine is a Chartered Occupational Psychologist, an HCPC registered Practitioner Psychologist, Chartered Accountant and Accredited Certified Business and Personal Coach (ACC) with the International Coaching Federation (ICF).

She is an experienced People and Organisation Change Specialist, who has held leadership roles in industry and consulting firms working and living both in the UK and overseas including the US and Middle East. She has over 25 years’ experience working for a variety of companies including in the Financial Services, Media, Professional Services and Government. sectors.

Her areas of interest include Culture / Behavioural Change, Communications, Wellbeing, People Strategy and Analytics. Lorraine is a committee member of the BPS Division of Occupational Psychology and is the trainee Occupational Psychologist lead and Career Development lead.

Ros Searle - Research Lead

Rosalind Searle holds is professor of HRM and Organizational Psychology at the Adam Smith Business School at the University of Glasgow.

She is Director for the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP) Impact Incubator.

Rosalind is a Chartered Occupational Psychologist and a Fellow of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and an academic Fellow of the Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development (CIPD).

She has a Ph.D. from Aston University. Her research focuses on organizational trust and HRM, trust and controls, change and counterproductive work behaviours.

Vicki Carrs - DOP Scotland Chair

Bio to follow.

Rachel Lindsay - DOP Northern Ireland Chair

Rachel Lindsay is a Chartered Psychologist and an HCPC registered Occupational Psychologist as well as a Chartered Member of the CIPD.

She is currently in her second term as Chair of the DOP Northern Ireland and the Northern Ireland representative on the DOP Committee. Prior to becoming Chair, she held positions as Treasurer of DOPNI and as a committee member. She is also a member of the Northern Ireland Branch of the BPS both as a committee member and representing DOPNI. She was previously a supervisor for the Society's Qualification in Occupational Psychology.

After an initial career in human resources and designing and delivering volume assessments in the public sector in Northern England she relocated to Northern Ireland.

In her current role she undertakes inspections of organisations in the criminal justice system, identifying good practice and making recommendations for improvement across the areas of strategy and governance, delivery and outcomes. Much of her work includes a focus on equality and diversity, human rights and the needs of victims and perpetrators of crime.

Joe Pinnock - Trainee Occupational Psychologist Lead

Joe is a current Stage 2 candidate, enrolled on the 2019 route and due to submit his summative submissions in 2025 having enrolled in January 2022. He is co-opted onto the DOP committee as the trainee Occupational Psychologist Lead until the next AGM in 2023.

His route to being a trainee Occupational Psychologist (TOP) began following a change of organization which could have benefited from an occupational psychologist half way through his psychology BSc with the Open University. This inspired the practical application in the workplace therefore the MSc with the University of Leicester and Stage 2 followed.

In his substantive role, Joe works for the National Health Service (NHS) in a trust which provides mental and physical health care as a Programme Manager. This role has responsibility for service change and projects in addition to managing the delivery of the Quality, Service Improvement Redesign programme, an NHS Improvement Methodology.

Joe is a member of the BPS Register of Qualified Test Users for both TUOA and TUOP and is trained to use a number of psychometric tools within the workplace.

Karen Walsh - Action Learning Project Lead

Bio coming soon.

Awards, Recognition and Ceremonies Lead - Vacant

Representatives

Dr Roberta Fida - EFPA representative

Dr Roberta Fida PhD CPsychol SFHEA is a Chartered Psychologist and Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

She is the Division representative to the European Federation of Psychologists’ Association’s (EFPA) Standing Committee on Work and Organizational Psychology. She is also leading the “Threats and Security” topic of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Impact Incubator.

Roberta is Associate Professor in Work Psychology at the Norwich Business School, University of East Anglia. Roberta’s main research interests are related to the understanding of unethical behaviour at work and how to prevent them. In particular she is interested on the role of moral disengagement and self-efficacy. She has conducted several funded research projects in Italy, the UK and Canada on wellbeing and stress at work. Roberta has also undertaken research projects in the health-care system with the aim of understanding the implication of workplace aggression. Roberta has published more than 80 papers in scientific journals including Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, Journal of Business Ethics, Journal of Vocational Behavior and Personality and Individual Differences.

Adrianna Prudenzi - PsyPAG representative

Bio to follow.

Karen Moore - Chair of the Occupational Psychology Qualifications Board

Karen Moore CPsychol AFBPsS is a Registered Occupational Psychologist and is currently Chair of the Occupational Psychology Qualifications Board.

For the past 40 years Karen has managed an experiential management development company, which she established with her husband and is now being run by the second generation of the family; working with all levels of management from graduates to the boards of multinational corporations. During this time, she  specialised in assessment for purposes from recruitment to promotion and restructuring departments, leading her to complete the Specialist in Test Use, Occupational certification.

With a lifetime interest in aviation, in 2017 Karen accepted an offer from one client to undertake a short secondment as Principal Occupational Psychologist to their assessment division which develops and delivers tests for the aviation sector, and she is currently still in this role.

Karen is particularly concerned that assessments, where and whenever they are carried out, should be conducted to the highest possible standards and using appropriate tests and test methodologies to ensure the fairest outcomes for candidates whilst being cost effective for the client.

Stephen Fisher - DOP Training Committee representative

Stephen Fisher is a Chartered Psychologist and Registered Practitioner with the HCPC working in the modality of Occupational Psychology.

He is co-chair of the Division of Occupational Psychology Training Committee and has been a committee member for some time.

Until recently he was an HCPC visitor a position held since the Occupational Psychology became a protected title.

Stephen is also a member of the newly formed EDI working group (EDIWG).

He worked for around 30 years as lecturer/senior lecturer at the University of Strathclyde where he co-organised the joint MSc in Occupation Psychology partnered with Glasgow Caledonian University.

Stephen has been a Lead Verifier for the society’s psychological test accreditation service.

David Biggs - DOP Training Committee representative

David is a HCPC registered Occupational Psychologist and chartered through the British Psychological Society (BPS).

David’s background is in academia (lecturing and management), business development and consulting.

He jointly heads up the DOP Training Committee (DOPTC) for the BPS that accredits MSc’s and doctorates in Occupational Psychology in the UK. David assesses and supervises on the Qualification in Occupational Psychology (QOP) that gives chartered status and HCPC registration for successful candidates. 

David’s research interests are in consulting, non-traditional work and artificial intelligence.

Committee meeting dates

Committee Meetings 2022

  • Tuesday 1 February: 9am – 1pm (Zoom)
  • Tuesday 26 April: 9am - 1pm (Zoom)
  • Tuesday 7 June: 9am – 1pm (Zoom)
  • Tuesday 2 August 9am – 1pm (Zoom)
  • Tuesday 4 October: 9am – 1pm (Zoom)
  • Tuesday 6 December: 9am – 1pm (Zoom)

Who should attend:

  • Officers - Chair, Vice Chair, Treasurer, Secretary
  • Nation Chairs
  • Elected/co-opted ordinary committee members
  • Named observers
  • Appointed representatives

Executive meetings 2022

Tuesday 4 January: 9am – 11am (Zoom)

Tuesday 2 March: 9am – 11am (Zoom)

Tuesday 3 May: 9am – 11am (Zoom)

Tuesday 5 July: 9am – 11am (Zoom)

Tuesday 5 September: 9am - 11am (Zoom)

Tuesday 1 November: 9am - 11am (Zoom)

Who should attend:

  • Officers - Chair, Vice Chair, Treasurer, Secretary
  • Other (tbc)