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PsyPAG

The Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group (PsyPAG) is the dedicated BPS community for psychology postgraduates based at UK institutions.

About

Run by postgraduates for postgraduates, PsyPAG provides support for psychology postgraduates in the UK. It acts as a means of communication for postgraduates around the country, and represents them within the BPS.

To become part of the PsyPAG community, all you need to do is join the society as a graduate member on a postgraduate course.

Once your membership is active, you will be automatically enrolled in to PsyPAG.

Become a member

Benefits of being a member of PsyPAG include:

  • Free subscription to PsyPAG Quarterly; a postgraduate-led peer-reviewed publication which covers all aspects of postgraduate psychology and welcomes a wide range of manuscripts, spanning from original empirical research to book and event reviews.
  • The chance to network with a community of likeminded psychology postgraduates across the country.
  • Discounted rates for the annual PsyPAG conference and workshop.
  • The opportunity to join the PsyPAG committee, who liaise with the Student Members’ Group to raise awareness of postgraduate issues in the undergraduate community.
  • The chance to represent postgraduates within The British Psychological Society.

For any enquiries, please email [email protected]

Group of students working

PsyPAG Guide

Committee

The elected PsyPAG committee, made up of research postgraduates, taught postgraduates, and practitioners-in-training, includes representatives for each sub-division within the BPS, with their role being to represent postgraduate interests within that network or the BPS generally.

They also liaise with the Student Committee to raise awareness of postgraduate issues in the undergraduate community.

There are currently a number of committee roles available.

Find out more about how to join the PsyPAG committee.

The Core Committee

Carrie Toplan - Chair

Bio coming soon.

Nina Higson-Sweeney - Vice Chair

Bio coming soon.

Catherine Hitch - Treasurer

Hi. I am Cat Hitch, Treasurer for PsyPAG, the Awards chair and sit on the Defence and Security committee. Yes, I like to be busy!

I am currently finishing up my PhD into trauma, mental health, alcohol and help-seeking for veterans in the Northern Ireland context.

I come from a military family therefore the armed forces community is close to my heart. I am also keen to help ‘hard to reach’ populations.

I came to post-graduate education later in life, whereby I quit my legal operations role to pursue full-time education.

After 25 years in the law it was time to pursue something that had greater meaning.

Krishna Talsania - Information Officer

Bio coming soon.

Liz Deehan - Communications Officer

Hi, I’m Liz! I started my PhD in Psychology at the University of Lincoln in 2019 and am completing this part-time alongside my full-time employment.

My PhD thesis focusses on sleep related paraphilia which are currently under-researched.

The over-arching aim of my research is to inform treatment and interventions for people who have been convicted of offences relating to these interests.

I am also working as an Offending Behaviour Programme Facilitator at a Category B prison in England, trained in and delivering medium and high intensity treatment programmes.

I am super excited to be taking the role of Communications Officer and to be elected as the Division of Forensic Psychology representative for PsyPAG.

Please get in touch with any questions or any topics you’d like to raise!

Additional teams and representatives

Quarterly Editorial Team

Ngozi Anyadike-Danes

Hey, my name is Ngozi Anyadike-Danes and I’m a PhD researcher at Ulster University. My research focuses on the unwanted sexual experiences of Northern Irish university students and the extent to which sexual consent comprehension and sexual stereotypes may impact their mental health. I’m also interested in policy development related to university sexual violence and sexual consent education in schools. Prior to my PhD, I completed an MSc in Behavioural Science in the Netherlands and a BSc in Criminology and Criminal Psychology in London.

This is my second year as a Quarterly Editor but I’m really keen to get involved and read your submissions to the Quarterly next year. If you have any questions, please feel free to send me an e-mail ([email protected]) or reach out to me on Twitter (@ngoziad).

Lucy Porter

Hi, my name is Lucy Porter and I’m a post-doctoral research associate at Loughborough University. I’ve just started working on a project to co-design an app with parents of 2-4 y/o children, that we hope will help families use effective feeding strategies (like exposure and modelling) to get their children eating more vegetables! I feel very lucky to have found a post-doc that complements my PhD research so nicely - I recently completed my PhD at the University of Exeter, which explored whether a food-specific inhibition training (a kind of healthy eating “brain training”) app could help children eat a more balanced diet.

Outside of academia, I work as a Behavioural Insights Adviser at the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities, where I get to apply evidence from psychology and other behavioural sciences to support decision-making and national health policy and practice.

I’m really enjoying my time with the Quarterly editorial team and can’t wait to read your submissions and help get them into print. If you’d like to get in touch, please email me on [email protected]

Abi Davies

Hi! I’m Abi, and I’m a PhD researcher at the University of Lincoln My research areas and interests are broad, but my PhD field is infant language development. I’m using novel testing methods to figure out how mothers influence babies’ speech development over time. I’m also interested in open science practices, maternal health and wellbeing, and autism research.

I am having a great time so far as a PsyPAG editors, and love reading the diverse range of research that postgraduate students bring to the table. You can get in touch by emailing me at [email protected], or via Twitter @AbiMBDavis

Lucie Thomas

Hello, my name is Lucie and I am PhD researcher at Aston University. My research is focussed on examining the effects of a rare metabolic disorder called Phenylketonuria (PKU) on cognition and psychological well-being. The main aims of my PhD are to better understand how the PKU treatment diet impacts brain health and cognitive abilities post-childhood, and to investigate how advancing age and PKU may interact with one another. Prior to my PhD, I completed an MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience at Aston University, and a BA in Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford. My research interests extend to all aspects of cognitive neuropsychology, with my previous research focussing on developing therapies for post-stroke aphasia.

I’m excited to join the Quarterly editorial team this year and can’t wait to read your submissions. If you’d like to get in touch, please feel free to email me at [email protected], or you can find me on Twitter @LucieThomas5

Division Representatives

Natalie Berry - Division of Clinical Psychology

Bio coming soon.

Jade Hardy - Division of Counselling Psychology

Hi, I’m Jade and am currently going into my second year of training on the Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology at the University of Wolverhampton.

I first started my journey in Psychology in 2008 after studying at Aston University. Since this time, my career and passion for working with people has taken me across a number of settings including; community and in-patient mental health settings and working in specialist care with looked after children.

My areas of interests include; attachment; trauma; and suicidal behaviour. My special interests have led me to centre my doctoral thesis to examining the relationship between an individuals strength of conviction of beliefs, suicidal behaviour and gender.

I am very excited to be taking on the role of representative for the Division of Counselling Psychology at PsychPag. I hope to be able to capture the collective voice and perspectives of all those studying in this area and aim to promote the inclusion and representation of the BAME and LGBTQ community; areas currently underrepresented in the field of Counselling Psychology.

Please feel free to get in touch with any queries, ideas, issues or opinions that you would like to discuss or bring to my attention.

You can contact me by email: [email protected] or on Twitter: @Psych_JHardy

Chloe Casey - Division of Educational and Child Psychology

I am a PhD student from Bournemouth University. My research focuses on the mental health and wellbeing of postgraduate research students in the UK and how they can be best supported; specifically focusing on coping and peer support. I am passionate about the experience, engagement, satisfaction and mental wellbeing of students, especially in higher education.

I am excited to represent PsyPAG in the Division of Educational and Child Psychology, especially in the COVID-19 context where postgraduates, and all students, face significant challenges from adapting to remote learning and engaging with peers, supervisors and support services online, to commencing research and transitioning safely back into the learning environment. I am keen to support fellow students as a representative, please feel free to contact me via email: [email protected] or you can find me on Twitter: @ChloeCaraCasey

Georgina Wren - Division for Academics, Researchers and Teachers in Psychology

Hi, I’m Georgina and I’m a second-year PhD student at Cardiff University in the Behavioural Genetics Group. Prior to starting my PhD, I completed a BSc in Psychology, then a MSc in Health Psychology at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Very simply, my current research is somewhat of an amalgamation of Dermatology, Psychology, Genetics and Medicine! Using a mixed-methods approach, I am interested in understanding the psychological and physical conditions associated with a rare congenital skin condition, X-linked ichthyosis. I am passionate about improving the patient experience, and exploring the link between this genetic deletion and physical manifestations.

Alongside my PhD, I also teach first year undergraduate students as a Graduate Teaching Assistant, co-chair a research translation and impact network for ECRs, and volunteer within a number of charities. I also like to play rugby in my spare time when I have the chance!

I’m excited to join the PsyPAG committee as DART-P representative, to support PGR’s who teach, and to improve the research environment and culture for Psychology postgrad students. If you have any questions or suggestions, please feel free to get in touch via email: [email protected], or Twitter @WrenGeorginaCU – I would love to hear from you!

Liz Deehan - Division of Forensic Psychology

Hi, I’m Liz! I started my PhD in Psychology at the University of Lincoln in 2019 and am completing this part-time alongside my full-time employment. My PhD thesis focusses on sleep related paraphilia which are currently under-researched. The over-arching aim of my research is to inform treatment and interventions for people who have been convicted of offences relating to these interests. I am also working as an Offending Behaviour Programme Facilitator at a Category B prison in England, trained in and delivering medium and high intensity treatment programmes.

I am super excited to be taking the role of Communications Officer and to be elected as the Division of Forensic Psychology representative for PsyPAG. Please get in touch with any questions or any topics you’d like to raise!

Twitter: @E_T_Deehan

Email: [email protected]

Daniel Walker - Division of Health Psychology

Hi I’m Danny and I am a third-year PhD student at Edge Hill University investigating the impact that concussion and physical pain can have on mental health, cognition, and quality of life. By better understanding how concussion and pain effects these three broad outcomes, we can better support those that have sustained head injury in sport or elsewhere. This project intends to have practical applications on the long-term guidance of managing and supporting those with concussion and/or experiencing physical pain.

I am excited to have been elected as a representative for the Division of Health Psychology for PsyPAG and keen to support fellow postgraduates. If you wish to get in touch please email: [email protected], contact me on Twitter: @walkerd_ehu

Stephanie-Roxanna Blanco - Division of Neuropsychology

Hello! I’m Steph, a PhD student in Neuropsychology at Nottingham Trent University. My specialisms include hidden illnesses, neuroimaging (especially EEG) and phlebotomy.

I’ve previously worked on projects exploring mental health, Schizotypy, nutrition and brain function. My biggest passion in research is Functional Neurological Disorder (FND); my current research aims to understand the neurobiology of FND and the condition’s relationship with inflammation, brain function, cognitive deficits and psychological traits.

In addition to my PhD I am a full time Lecturer in Neuropsychology at BGU, associate lecturer at NTU, trustee at FND Dimensions and a Member of the International Society for FND.

I’m very excited to have been elected as the Division of Neuropsychology Representative for PsyPAG. Please feel free to get in touch for support, guidance, general chit chat or on issues you’d like raised via email: [email protected] or on Twitter: @S_R_Blanco

Arianna Prudenzi - Division of Occupational Psychology

I am Arianna Prudenzi, the PsyPAG representative on the BPS Division of Occupational Psychology.

I completed my undergraduate degree in Psychology (BSc Hons) and later graduated with a Masters in Psychology (MSc Hons) from La Sapienza University of Rome. I am now a Doctoral Researcher at the School of Psychology, University of Leeds.

My background falls under the framework of occupational health psychology. My current research interests focus on developing, testing and implementing novel Cognitive Behavioural Interventions (CBT) in organisations. In my PhD, I am testing the effectiveness of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy intervention to improve wellbeing and reduce burnout of NHS staff. Also, I am a Teaching Assistant to Level 1 and Level 2 undergraduate students in the School of Psychology and the School of Education, University of Leeds.

I am a member of the Yorkshire Patient Safety Translational Centre (Workforce Wellbeing and Engagement Theme), the STARlab (Laboratory for Stress and Health Research), and the Health and Social Psychology Research Group at the University of Leeds. Prior to my PhD, I undertook research experiences as a Visiting Scholar or Research Assistant at the School of Psychology, Arizona State University (USA), the School of Psychology, University College Dublin (Ireland), and the Department of Psychology at La Sapienza University of Rome (Italy).

If you are interested in supporting the mental health of healthcare professionals or employees during COVID-19 and would like to receive some support on setting up your study, please do not hesitate to get in contact with me. I warmly welcome any correspondence regarding this role via email [email protected](link sends e-mail) or Twitter @AriannaPrudenzi.

Dane McCarrick - Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology

Dane completed his undergraduate degree in Psychology with Sports Science (BSc Hons) at Northumbria University in 2017 and later graduated with a Masters in Research Psychology (MRes) in 2018. Dane’s research encompasses Sport, Personality and Health psychology and he is a Graduate Member of the British Psychological Society within the Division of Health Psychology and Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology.

Dane has also worked at the mental health charity ‘MIND’ as an empowerment worker in clinical and sub-clinical settings; aiding in the delivery of interventions to improve psychological wellbeing, before commencing his current PhD candidature (funded by the ESRC White Rose Doctoral Training Partnership) at the University of Leeds and undertaking work for the UK Government as a Data Analyst. Dane’s current research interests are: (i) the ways in which negative thoughts, such as worry and rumination, impact physical and behavioural health outcomes; (ii) how work-related stressors influences sleep behaviours, with a specific view on psychological interventions to tackle negative affect, and; (iii) how ‘high-stress’ occupation groups manage and respond to stress, notably association football referees.

Dane is also a member of the Football Association Referee Mental Health Group and MIND’s Physical Activity & Mental Health Advisory Group as well as being an active match official within the professional game. At Leeds, Dane currently works within the Laboratory for Stress and Health Research (STARlab) and is a member of the Health and Social Psychology Research Group, and also teaches on a number of undergraduate modules within the School of Psychology. Dane is delighted to represent PsyPAG for the Division of Sport and Exercise and warmly welcomes any correspondence regarding this role.

Beth Clare McManus - Division of Coaching Psychology

Hello, I’m Beth from Manchester. I work as a coaching psychologist and illustrator, supporting individuals and organisations to develop using a visual and engaging approach. My work is dedicated to supporting people to be human at work, with a particular focus on wellbeing, emotions, and creativity.

I hold a BSc (Hons) Psychology and Human Resource Management; MSc Organisational Psychology; and MSc Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology. My research on the use of music and mark-making in coaching supervision to support reflective practice and connection to the self has been published in the peer-reviewed journal, ‘Philosophy of Coaching’. I will be undertaking a PGCert in Coaching Psychology Supervision in September 2022.

I have recently joined the Co-op as a People Coach, exploring ways to bring creativity and reflection into an internal coaching and developmental offer. My coaching philosophy is developing around positive psychology coaching, incorporating creative practice as a tool for reflection and enhanced connection to the self. I believe that coaching allows us to achieve clarity through exploring our thoughts and emotions, and I love to watch people think and experience their emotions. My core areas of interest and exploration are creativity and reflective practice in coaching and coaching supervision.

Alongside PsyPAG, I volunteer as a coach for The Pankhurst Trust and I am a founding member of The Centre for Psychology at Work. In 2021 I contributed to EMCC UK’s ‘Knowledge Exchange’ spotlight series in with a series of illustrated guides.

Section Representatives

Chris Robus - Cognitive Psychology section

Hello everyone! I’m Chris Robus, PsyPAG representative for the BPS Cognitive Psychology section.

I am a PhD student and visiting lecturer at the University of Bedfordshire. My research is investigating how the inclusion of digital faces used in computer-mediated communication affect lexical processing, emotional perception formation and memory. Before this, I graduated from my M.Sc. in Research Methods in Psychology from the University of Hertfordshire, and completed my BSc in Psychology at the University of Bedfordshire.  My wider research interests include cyberpsychology, psycholinguistics, cognition, neuropsychology and the philosophy of psychology.

If you have any questions, input or issues, please do not hesitate to contact me. Please contact [email protected]. You can also follow me on Twitter @chrisrobus

Josh Bolam - Consciousness and Experiential Psychology section

Bio coming soon.

Chriss Leech - Cyberpsychology section

Hello, my name is Christopher Leech, I am a PhD researcher at Edge Hill University. My research is looking at the impact of video games upon mental health. What I am most interested in, is looking at what impact playing a game with explicit mental health information has on knowledge of mental health, and attitudes towards it. Specifically, I am interested in how this impacts students as a population due to the challenges students face with their mental health.

Being involved with PsyPAG is a true pleasure and a privilege, representing the Cyberpsychology section for the next two years is a dream come true. I am hoping to help foster a strong Cyberpsychology community and provide a collaborative space for us to connect and support each other. Also, about me, I’m a person with Albinism and legally blind/visually impaired/severely sight impaired – so representation, equality and equity are very close to my heart. In my other-time, I’m also a PGR rep within my university, a Streaming Ambassador for mental health charities Take This.org, and Safe In Our World, a podcaster, and as you might have guessed I’m quite the nerd! Feel free to get in touch, I’m very active on Twitter, and you can find me on my weekly Twitch show too or if you’d prefer drop me an email.

Catherine Hitch - Defence and Security Psychology section

Bio coming soon.

Caroline Appleton - Developmental Psychology section

Hi there! I’m Caroline, and I’m the PsyPAG rep for the Developmental Section. I’m a part-time PhD student at Loughborough University, my research focuses on how preschool children learn maths concepts like counting and recognising numbers (maths is fun, I promise!). Both my undergrad and Masters are also in developmental psychology, but I never expected to be doing a PhD!

Outside of academia, I volunteer with some amazing charities fighting for equality for women and disabled people, I love to read and to try (and often fail) to make vegan cakes.

If you have any questions, please get in touch at [email protected]

Zyra Evangelista - Psychology of Sexualities section

Hi everyone! I’m Zy, PsyPAG Representative for the Psychology of Sexualities Section.

My primary research interest is in LGBT+ psychology, particularly in understanding anti-LGBT+ prejudice and its impact on LGBT+ identity development and well-being. My PhD project focuses on improving LGBT+ inclusion in higher education. It involves a multi-phased, cross-country, mixed-method comparative campus climate study on LGBT+ university students in the UK and Philippines.

As a University of Glasgow Future World Changer, I advocate for LGBT+ equality globally. Outside of academia, I serve as one of the See Me Proud LGBT Community Champions and co-founder of the Rainbow Glasgaroos. As the PsyPAG representative for the Psychology of Sexualities Section, I want to promote the interests of postgraduates and early career researchers working in the field of LGBT+ psychology so please feel free to get in touch with me at [email protected]. You can also follow me on Twitter @evangelista_zy.

Dennis Relojo-Howell - Male Psychology section

Digital mental health is at the core of what I do – I’m Dennis, the founder and managing director of Psychreg. I’m also a psychology YouTuber.

Alongside creating digital contents, I’m also doing my PhD in clinical psychology at the University of Edinburgh; my research explores the viability of blogs as a resilience intervention for young adults.

Academia is teeming with hypercompetition, so while I’m expected to showcase my little successes here, I also want to make my failures visible – because they are part of my progress. You can find my ‘CV of Failures’ on my personal website

The Male Psychology Section is an underrepresented group within the BPS. As such, among other things, the Section aims to address gamma bias which occurs when one gender difference is minimised while simultaneously another is magnified.

As a representative, I aim to be actively involved in fostering rational discussions around gender issues. I’m just an email away: [email protected]

Donna Smith - Psychology of Education section (co-rep)

Hi, I’m Donna Smith, PsyPAG Representative for the BPS Psychology of Education Section.

I am a PhD researcher in the Psychology, Education and Learning Studies (PELS) Research Group at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, and a member of the Wellbeing and Inclusion Special Interest Group.  My research focuses on mental health in first generation university students. 

I am interested in the psychology of education across the lifespan and have held various volunteering roles with students of all ages.  I have been an adult literacy teacher, a reading tutor for disadvantaged students, and a trainer for a wellbeing intervention programme in secondary schools.

I joined the PsyPAG Committee in July 2021 and I’m really looking forward to hearing from psychology of education postgraduate students about any issues, concerns or suggestions you would like me to raise at PsyPAG and BPS Psychology of Education Section meetings.  If you’d like to get in touch, please contact me by email [email protected] or on Twitter @Donna_L_Smith

Bronte McDonald - Psychology of Education section (co-rep)

Hi, I’m Brontë and I’m the co-rep for PsyPAG Psychology of Education section.

I was previously a primary school teacher and is now a PhD researcher at the University of Sussex. My PhD is working towards developing and evaluating a community-based intervention with primary school-aged children who are experiencing school attendance problems during the Covid-19 pandemic. My research interests include child mental health particularly anxiety, education, dyslexia, and parent wellbeing.

Outside of the academia world I teach Pilates and love walking with my big golden lab Barney!

I am excited to meet with and support fellow researchers in the Psychology of Education world. If you’d like to get in touch, please contact me: [email protected]

Lucy Eldred - Psychology of Women and Equalities section

Hi, I’m Lucy and I’m a PhD researcher and Graduate Teaching Assistant at Leeds Beckett University.

My PhD is looking at young masculinities and whether/how they may be changing. I am really interested in intersecting identities, and how identities such as gender, race, class, age and ethnicity all shape our experiences and our understandings.

The Psychology of Women and Equalities is an amazingly friendly and inclusive group and I hope to bring some of that energy to my PsyPAG role!

My contact email is: [email protected] and I’d welcome you to get in touch with any questions or queries.

Annayah Prosser - Social Psychology section

Bio coming soon.

Charlotte O’Brien - Crisis, Disaster and Trauma

Hello! I’m Charlie O’Brien, Crisis, Disaster and Trauma rep at PsyPAG. 

I am a second-year postgraduate student studying on the Counselling Psychology Doctoral programme at the University of York St John.  My research focusses on embodied trauma and how it is experienced by refugees and asylum seekers.  I am also exploring how practitioners are treating embodied trauma within the field of psychology today, looking at what is working and why.

I am really excited to be taking on this role to engage, support and connect postgraduate students with an interest in Crisis, Disaster and Trauma work, using the brilliant network and resources within PsyPAG and the BPS.  I hope to create an inclusive community within this section to share knowledge, experiences and ideas.

Please feel free to contact me with any questions, input, ideas or issues at [email protected], and you can find me on Twitter @CharlirB.  I look forward to meeting and connecting with you!

Branch Representatives

Emma Smillie - North West of England branch

Bio coming soon.

Natash Dalton - Northern Ireland branch

Hi, my name is Natasha, and I am a PhD researcher at Ulster University. I am interested in attachment theory, particularly in adulthood and the application of the Adult Attachment Interview for clinical research. Currently researching attachment in care-experienced and adopted adults.

I am very excited to be the new Northern Ireland branch rep, and I am keen to ensure the voices of NI postgraduates are heard and represented on the PsyPag committee. I would love to hear from you, if you have any suggestions or queries, please contact me via [email protected] or find me on twitter @NatashaDalton_

Izzy Ball - Wessex Branch

Hi, I’m Izzy, your PsyPAG rep for Wessex. I am based in Chichester where I am currently working as a Research Assistant and Associate Lecturer while completing my PhD.

My PhD is focused on the transition from school/college to university and higher education. The goal is to identify the key factors on an individual level that impact ‘success’ in this transition and create an intervention protocol that can be rolled out before students leave school to better prepare them for this transition. I am primarily interested in quantitative methods and statistics. I primarily teach on research method modules and am co-lead of the Peer Assisted Learning Scheme.

I’m very excited to be your rep, and would love to hear from you, if you have any suggestions of queries. You can find me on twitter @IzzyBall98 or email me – [email protected]

Lara Quartel - London and Home Counties Branch

Bio coming soon.

Additional Committee Members

Jenny Terry - Research Board Representative

See Chair bio.

Myrto Efstathiou - Standing Conference Committee

Hi! I am a PhD student and a Graduate Teaching Assistant at Heriot-Watt University and my PhD explores how we perceive our bodily self. During my PhD, I have had opportunities to organise events and activities to better strengthen our community, enhance our voice and reduce feelings of isolation. As the Conference Standing Committee member and Awards co-chair, I plan on continuing this path and supporting our postgraduate community.

Feel free to contact me via [email protected] or via Twitter @Myr_Efstathiou

Tanya Schrader - Undergraduate Liaison Officer

I am in final year of my PhD at Staffordshire University researching the dark side of conspiracy theory beliefs.  Thus far, I have found that conspiracy beliefs, in conjunction with social dominance orientation, leads to the justification of violence towards Muslim immigrants. I am currently analysing data to test whether these effects are also found in jury decision-making. 

I am also a fulltime lecturer at the University of Wolverhampton.  I teach social, forensic and cyberpsychology, as well as, research methods.

I have been with PsyPAG for almost 3 years and have undertaken a variety of roles, including the 2021 Awards Chair and interim treasurer.  PsyPAG has been a lifeline for me, particularly through the pandemic.  As PhD researhers, we can sometimes feel a bit disconnected and isolated, but PsyPAG has helped develop my identity within academia.

Feel free to contact me at [email protected]

Becoming a PsyPAG representative

Elections for open positions are held at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) which takes place at the PsyPAG Conference in July. However, it is possible for positions to become available throughout the year.

If a position does become available, we will make a call for applications through our social media channels, as well as other communications, such as the psychology research JISCmail list. All applications will be reviewed by the committee where an individual is co-opted at the quarterly committee meeting.

To become a PsyPAG representative, you must meet the following criteria:

  1. You must be enrolled on a postgraduate course at a UK institution

  2. You must have at least six months left of your course

  3. You must be a BPS member

You will be required to submit evidence of your studentship along with your application.

For information on any of our vacant positions, please contact the current representative or alternatively the vice-chair.

The Quarterly

The Quarterly is the official publication of PsyPAG.

It is a postgraduate-led, peer-reviewed publication which covers all aspects of postgraduate psychology and welcomes a wide range of manuscripts, spanning from original empirical research to book and event reviews.

The Quarterly is published each quarter, in March, June, September and December.

Thinking about getting published? Why not submit an article to the Quarterly?

Before submitting an article, please review the instructions and submission guidelines below.

We also encourage you to use our Editor’s checklist.

To submit, please send your article as an email attachment to [email protected]

If you have any queries regarding submission, please contact [email protected]

For updates and news on the Quarterly, please follow our twitter account @PsyPAGQuarterly.

 

Instructions and submission guidelines

Types of articles accepted

The Quarterly publishes a wide range of articles that contribute to an understanding of psychology. Submissions may correspond to the following article types:

  • Feature Articles and Discussion Papers: Articles may cover a wide range of topics. Articles may describe a piece of original research; provide an overview of a theory, area of issue.
  • Research in Brief: A short report of original research, often preliminary findings.
  • Big Interviews: An interview with anyone connected with Psychology, usually written in a question and answer format.
  • Reflective: Reflective pieces may observe events, human interactions and perspectives in the field of Psychology. We also welcome reflections on teaching practices.
  • Conference Reviews: Provide an overview of a conference, outlining the main themes of the conference.
  • Departmental Reviews: An overview of a department as well as research interests of the postgraduates.
  • Book and Software Reviews: A review of books or software relevant to psychologists.
  • Hints and Tips: Hints and tips that will be useful to postgraduates. For example, how to apply for funding; how to conduct systematic literature reviews or meta-analyses; statistical techniques.
  • Postgraduate Research in Brief: This is a reference list of research that has recently been published by postgraduates within a particular area or department.
  • Guest Author: Articles written by those with a PhD and that would be of interest to psychology postgraduates. This can be any one of the other types of articles we accept e.g. hints & tips, discussion paper etc.

Word limits and references

Word limits
  • Abstracts: from August 2015, an abstract is required with a maximum word limit of 100 words.

  • Manuscripts: the journal has a broad word limit of 500 - 2000 words excluding abstract and references.

    The maximum word limit is flexible for in depth discussion papers, longer interviews, or hints and tips.

    The word count will differ depending on the type of article; for example, conference and book reviews should be shorter than featured articles.

References
  • Articles should have a maximum of 15 references. Articles that do not adhere to these guidelines will be sent back to the author.

  • Please state in your submission e-mail if your manuscript is attached to a PsyPAG bursary.

Formatting requirements

  • Please submit all articles in Microsoft Word (or Open Office for Mac, etc.).

  • You should use the running head (i.e., an informative shortened version of your title) as the file name, for example EpisodicMemoryConsolidation.doc.

  • The content, including tables, figures and references should all comply with BPS house style. 

  • Articles should be double spaced, in a font size of 12.

  • Single spaces should be used to begin a new sentence.

  • You should also include your contact details (authors name, affiliation and e-mail address) at the end of each article

Correspondence

When submitting an article, please ensure you include the following details:

  • Name
  • Role, Department, University
  • Email address

Writing tips

Before you start writing, you should think about the following:
1. Content

Key considerations and recommendations regarding content include having clear, logical arguments. For a detailed guide please consult Elsevier’s Elements of Style for Writing Scientific Journal Articles.

Remember that these tips are applicable to any article type!

2. Style

The Quarterly encourages postgraduates to write concisely, and to use language and style that reflects BPS and APA guidelines.

For further information consult the BPS Style Guide.

3. Audience

The Quarterly cater to a range of postgraduate psychologists, who may not necessarily be expert in your specific area of work. It can be tricky to strike a balance between accessible academic language and still stay true to your key messages as the author. Wherever possible we encourage you to consider the specific audience you are writing for.

Things to consider as you are writing:
1. Make it personal

In some cases, making the manuscript more personal can make the article much more interesting to read. For example, when doing a conference/book/software review, what was personally interesting to you? Did you learn something at the conference that you will take forward in your own work? Was there a particular chapter of the book that you found particularly relevant/helpful to your own work? If so, why? Of course, this is not applicable to some types of article that we accept, including featured articles/discussion papers and research in brief, where a scientific writing style is expected.

2. Stigmatising terms

Ensure that your writing is professional and avoid any negative or stigmatising terms. For example, terms such as “mentally ill person” should be avoided and replaced with “individuals/people with a mental illness”. As you write your article, think about how you would reflect upon it in years to come!

This article provides a range of incorrect and inappropriate (but often extensively used) terms that you should try to avoid.

3. Avoiding Ambiguity

Besides avoiding needless complexity, you also should avoid ambiguity in your writing. Ambiguity is created by the use of a word, phrase, or sentence that can be interpreted in more than one way. Many ambiguities in scientific writing are difficult to classify. A pronoun must refer to a single, particular noun, which acts as its antecedent. When multiple antecedents exist, the error is called an ambiguous pronoun reference. When a specific antecedent doesn’t even exist, the resulting error is called a vague pronoun reference.

Avoiding ambiguous pronoun references:
  • Error: When Samuel dropped the goblet onto the glass table, it broke. (What broke? The table or the goblet?)
  • Correction: The goblet broke when Samuel dropped it onto the glass table.
Avoiding vague pronoun references:
  • Error: Sleeping eight hours a night is vital to students’ health, yet research clearly shows they simply don’t do it. (Does “it” have a specific noun serving as its antecedent?)
  • Correction: Although sleeping eight hours a night is vital to students’ health, research clearly shows they simply don’t sleep that much.
4. Avoiding Colloquial Writing

In scholarly writing, except when reporting conversation, it is best to use standard language and to avoid colloquial language and slang. Using colloquial language can make the author and the piece sound less credible. Colloquial language is language that does not conform to the stands set by schools, media, and public institutions. It is often acceptable in everyday conversion and in fictional writing but seldom is used in formal speech or other forms of writing.

Colloquial examples: "contraption," "fire," "kid," "how come," and "quote" Standard: "device," "dismiss," "child," "why," and "quotation."

Finishing off:
1. Co-authors and collaboration

When writing up your research for publication in other journals, it is often the case that your supervisors and other collaborators will be co-authors who contribute to and review the manuscript before submission. Personal experience shows that this typically improves written work immensely, and therefore we highly encourage you to work with your supervisors on submissions to PsyPAG Quarterly too! Your manuscript is much more likely to be accepted if it has been reviewed by established academics and is therefore of a higher standard as a result. However, ensure you discuss whether your supervisors will be in the acknowledgements or a co-author prior to submission.

2. References

References are one of the easiest aspects of a manuscript to do, yet it is rare to receive an article that doesn’t have referencing errors. Your manuscript will be returned to you if referencing errors are found, so please ensure you check them thoroughly before submitting your article. PsyPAG follows BPS house style referencing guidelines, which can be found by following the link in the second tip called “style”.

Funding

PsyPAG offers three funding schemes open to help postgraduates engage in extracurricular activities.

All psychology postgraduates registered at a UK institution are eligible to apply for our funding schemes.

Workshops

A PsyPAG sponsored workshop should be aimed specifically at postgraduates to enable skill development relevant to those completing postgraduate study. We also encourage inviting postgraduates to present at your workshop.

Previous workshops

Previous workshops include:

  • An Introduction to Multilevel Modelling
  • Exploring Culture and Experience: Choosing Methodologies in Qualitative Research
  • Books, Burnout and Balance
Funding strategy

We encourage applicants to ask for joint funding from another source (e.g. your university, a division/section of the BPS or an employer).

This is because we want our budget to support as many events as possible.

If interested, or would like more information, please contact the Vice Chair at [email protected]

Why should you apply?

Applying for workshop funding is valuable experience.

  • It shows employers that you are able to use your initiative, budget, negotiate and plan.
  • It fills a gap in your own training needs and benefits others at the same time.
  • It gives you the opportunity to network and meet people you may be able to work with in the future
How to apply

Application deadlines are on 28 February, 30 June, and 31 October every year.

PsyPAG bursaries

PsyPAG awards a number of bursaries to help psychology postgraduates attend conferences and other events, both at home and abroad. All psychology postgraduates registered at a UK institution are eligible to apply for our bursary funds.

We offer a range of popular bursaries to help support professional development, including attendance at conferences (both international and domestic), workshop/training events, research grants and study visits.

We also offer standalone travel bursaries which can help towards travel costs for domestic conferences, as well as Research Grant bursaries that can help support postgraduates with their research.

Conference bursaries

Our conference bursaries are structured to enable us to award bursaries to as many people as possible. There are two types of award:

PsyPAG International Conference Bursary

This is an award of up to £300 to help with the cost of attending an international conference. This can be used towards registration, travel, materials (such as poster printing) and accommodation costs.

To apply for this International Conference bursary, please fill out an application form here

PsyPAG Domestic Conference Bursary 

This is an award of up to £100 to help with the cost of attending a UK conference. This can be used towards registration, materials (such as poster printing) and accommodation costs. If you need further support for travel to a domestic conference, you should apply for a travel bursary also.

Please note: This bursary does not apply to the PsyPAG conference bursary.

To apply for this Domestic Conference bursary, please fill out an application form here

Workshop or training events

You can apply for a bursary of up to £100 to help with costs in attending certain professional development events, such as workshops and training courses. This fund can be used towards registration, travel and accommodation costs.

To apply for this workshop/training event bursary, please fill out an application form here

Research grant bursaries

You can apply for a research grant bursary, up to the amount of £300. This fund can be used to assist you in conducting research as part of your postgraduate studies.

For example, this fund may help with paying participants in exchange for taking part in your research or helping with your travel costs when collecting data away from your University.

This fund can be used towards participant incentives, cost of materials and travel costs (i.e. petrol receipts or train tickets)

Please note that expenses will be paid for research activities only and all receipts should be submitted to the Treasurer.

If unsure, please contact our Information Officer [email protected] or Treasurer [email protected]

To apply for this research grant bursary, please download and complete an application form.

PsyPAG Annual Conference bursaries

In addition to the bursaries above, we offer up to 20 bursaries of up to £100 to support the associated costs delegates wishing to present and attend the PsyPAG Annual Conference. In addition, we are also offering one bursary of up to £300 for students based at international institutions. This is a separate application process specific to our annual conference. These funds can be used to fun registration, accommodation and travel costs only.

Application information

The deadlines for each round are: 10th February, 10th June and 10th October. Applications will be reviewed by the bursary sub-committee after each deadline and all applicants will be notified if they have been successful within 6-7 weeks.

Successful International Conference, Study Visit and Research Grant bursary applicants are required to write an article for the PsyPAG Quarterly (Note: Successful Domestic Conference, Workshop and Travel applicants are exempt from this condition).

All our PsyPAG bursaries can be offered retrospectively – in other words, you are eligible to be considered for a bursary when the event has already happened (e.g., you would be eligible for an international bursary within the June round, even if you attended the conference in May).

Applicants are welcome to submit an application to more than one bursary category per round. Please note however, that an applicant cannot be awarded two bursaries in the same round (unless the two awards are domestic and travel bursaries combined).

For more information please contact our information officer

Awards

The PsyPAG Awards are an opportunity for PsyPAG to celebrate and draw attention to some of the most exceptional work and/or teaching completed by our members.

The awards acknowledge an individual’s outstanding work and achievements and can help you stand-out to potential employers.

We have a range of awards to include a variety of stages of research and teaching. You can find a list of our awards below, with more information on each, including eligibility, how to apply and prizes.

For any questions regarding our awards, please contact [email protected]

Practitioner Psychologist Trainee Award

Applications are now closed.

The PsyPAG Practitioner Psychologist Trainee Award was newly launched for 2020 and specifically recognises trainees working towards formal registration in Clinical, Counselling, Forensic, Education, Occupational, Sports and Health Psychology and Clinical Neuropsychology.

This award aims to celebrate exceptional early career practitioners and the skills necessary for working with service users.

It also acknowledges the dual focus of practical and academic work, commending the high-quality research that is being conducted by practitioner psychologist trainees.

Prize

The winner of the PsyPAG Practitioner Psychologist Trainee Award will receive:

  • £100 cash prize.
  • An invitation to the PsyPAG annual conference to orally present their work at our Awards ceremony or present a poster;
  • Expenses to the annual PsyPAG conference up to £150 (to cover registration, travel, and accommodation);
  • The opportunity to publish an article in the PsyPAG Quarterly (subject to peer review).
Eligibility

In order to apply for this Award applicants must meet the following criteria:

  • Hold BPS membership
  • Studying a BPS accredited course or Stage 2 qualification
  • Studying a recognised formal practitioner training programme in Clinical, Counselling, Forensic, Occupation, Sports, Health Psychology or Clinical Neuropsychology in the UK (including Higher Education Institution and BPS pathways);
  • Not yet submitted the final thesis (pre-viva).

If you do not meet the above criteria then please consider one of our other Awards that may be more appropriate. If you are unsure about any of the criteria then please contact the Awards Chair at [email protected]

Applying

Applicants to the Practitioner Psychologist Trainee Award must evidence:

  • The development of practitioner skills, demonstrating an understanding of the importance of empirical evidence and reflexivity to their work
  • Ability to develop successful relationships with service users (if applicable)
  • The impact of social, cultural, spiritual, political and economic values within their practice
  • Research work undertaken, including its theoretical and/or practical importance, and its originality
  • Public dissemination of research and/or practitioner work;
  • Characteristics, qualities, and skills which make the student an exceptional candidate
  • Support of supervisor(s)
  • A clear rationale as to why the researcher should be considered for this award.

Masters Award

Applications are now closed.

The PsyPAG Masters Award recognises outstanding research in a Masters (MSc, MA, MRes, and MPhil) level research project. Submissions are invited from all areas of Psychology.

The aim of the award is to provide recognition of the excellent research that is conducted at Masters level, which we feel, is sometimes overlooked.

Prize

 The winner of the PsyPAG Masters Award will receive:

    • £100 cash prize.
    • An invitation to the PsyPAG annual conference to orally present their research at our Awards ceremony or present a poster;
    • Expenses to the annual PsyPAG conference up to £150 (to cover registration, travel, and accommodation);
    • The opportunity to publish findings in the PsyPAG Quarterly (subject to peer review).
Eligibility

In order to apply for this Award applicants must meet the following criteria:

    • Within 18 months of completing a Masters level course at a UK university;
    • Awarded at least 60% for the dissertation component of the degree.
    • Awarded a final classification of either a merit or distinction for the degree.

If you do not meet the above criteria then please consider one of our other Awards which may be more appropriate. If you are unsure about any of the criteria then please contact the Awards Chair at [email protected]

Rising Researcher Award

Applications are now closed.

The PsyPAG Rising Researcher Award recognises outstanding early PhD/Doctorate research.

This award aims to celebrate the high-quality research which is being conducted at this level and champion fantastic upcoming researchers. Submissions are invited from all areas of psychology.

Prize

The winner of the PsyPAG Rising Researcher Award will receive:

  • £100 cash prize.
  • An invitation to the PsyPAG annual conference to orally present their research at our Awards ceremony or present a poster;
  • Expenses to the annual PsyPAG conference up to £150 (to cover registration, travel, and accommodation);
  • The opportunity to publish findings in the PsyPAG Quarterly (subject to peer review).
Eligibility

In order to apply for this Award applicants must meet the following criteria:

  • Studying a doctoral level degree at a UK university;
  • At least one year full time or two year’s part time into the doctorate;
  • Not yet submitted the final thesis (pre-viva).

If you do not meet the above criteria then please consider one of our other Awards which may be more appropriate. If you are unsure about any of the criteria then please contact the Awards Chair at [email protected]

Applying

In order to apply for the Rising Researcher Award applicants must evidence:

    • Originality of approach;
    • The importance of the project in relation to previous and on-going research;
    • Specific contribution to the long-term impact of the field, in terms of methodological rigour, theoretical contribution and/or practical applications;
    • Dissemination of research through publications and presentations;
    • Personal characteristics or qualities which have enabled the researcher to overcome personal adversities or to persevere through any research difficulties (if any).
    • A clear rationale as to why the project and the researcher should be considered for this award.

Division for Academics, Researchers and Teachers in Psychology Award

Applications are now closed.

The BPS Division for Academics, Researchers and Teachers in Psychology have kindly sponsored an award, in association with PsyPAGm which recognises excellence in teaching psychology.

Many postgraduate students assist with various teaching roles to gain experience for a future career in academia and this Award aims to acknowledge the crucial role that postgraduates have in teaching.

Prize

The winner of the DART-P / PsyPAG Teaching Award will receive:

  • £150 cash prize;
  • A one-year subscription to DART-P;
  • A teaching-related textbook presented at our PsyPAG annual conference;
  • And  the opportunity to publish in the DART-P publication, the Psychology Teaching Review.
Eligibility

In order to be eligible for this Award you must meet the following criteria:

  • Member of the BPS; and a postgraduate at a UK institution (not yet submitted final PhD thesis)

If you do not meet the above criteria then please consider one of our other Awards which may be more appropriate. If you are unsure about any of the criteria then please contact the Awards Chair at [email protected]

Applying

When applying for the DART-P/ PsyPAG Teaching Award applicants must demonstrate their excellence under one (or more) of the following categories:

  • Inspiring student learning (e.g. feedback from students on module evaluation forms or other testimonials from students or colleagues);
  • Supporting academic staff in a way that enhances the student experience;
  • Innovation in teaching practice (e.g. innovation in small/large group teaching, learning materials, use of technology, assessment and feedback)

If you would like to apply for the award, please submit a nomination here.

PsyPAG Awards Results 2022

Congratulations to all the PsyPAG 2022 award winners, runner-ups and highly commended!

We received so many amazing submissions and we thank all the applicants for their hard work and for applying.

Winners of PsyPAG Master Award

  • First place: Nicola O’Donnell
  • Runner-up: Branwen Dafis
  • Highly Commended: Lucy Waldren

Winners of PsyPAG Rising Researcher Award

  • First place: Georgina Wren
  • Runner-up: Annayah Prosser
  • Highly Commended: Ian Hadden

Winners of PsyPAG DART-P Award

  • First place: Liz Travis
  • Runner-up: Gaby Mahrholz
  • Highly Commended: Sean Westwood

Winners of PsyPAG Practitioner Award

  • First place: Vanessa See Yim
  • Runner-up: Nico Amari
  • Highly Commended: Marie Bech

Conference

This year’s conference will be held online on Wednesday 27 and Thursday 28 July.

Posters

Poster abstracts should be max. 300 words and should include details on empirical work, methodology, and implications. Non-data-driven posters (e.g., practice exchange pieces, reflections, work in progress) are also very welcome. 

Oral presentations

Oral presentations will be 10 minutes with 5 minutes of scheduled time for dedicated Q&A. Abstracts for oral presentations should be max. 300 words and should include details on empirical work, methodology, and implications.

Non-data-driven presentations (e.g., practice exchange pieces and reflections) are also very welcome. We also welcome presentations of work in progress, including pre-data collection.

Workshops

Workshops will typically be scheduled for 45-60 minutes in the conference proceedings.

Workshop abstracts should be max. 300 words and should include details on workshop need, structure, and expected outcomes for delegates.

Workshops that require prior knowledge or skills (e.g., R, coding, qualitative methods) should be detailed clearly in the abstract.

If you have an idea for a workshop proposal and would like more guidance, please contact Maddi on [email protected]

Feedback

PsyPAG was by far one of the best conferences I have attended as a postgraduate researcher. I met some really great people at PsyPAG who have now become great friends and even potential research collaborators for in the future. It was great to hear and share similar stories about the struggles of PhD life and realising you are not alone in your experience of academia. Already can’t wait to attend PsyPAG 2020!

Danielle Paddock - PhD Student at York St John University

PsyPAG was the first psychology conference I’d attended as PhD Student and the first conference I’d attended without anyone else from my department. But my no means did I feel alone – I met so many people with similar interests to me and I got to present my poster in a really supportive environment where people asked me lots of really helpful questions! PsyPAG conference has felt like being part of a community of aspiring early career psychologists.

Nicola McGuire - PhD Student at University of Glasgow