A group of people in discussion

Division of Coaching Psychology

The Division of Coaching Psychology supports coaching psychologists, coaches, individual clients and organisations who are interested in learning more about coaching psychology and coaching services. We share research as well as practical experiences that

The DoCP's definition of coaching psychology is 'the scientific study and application of behaviour, cognition and emotion to deepen our understanding of individuals’ and groups’ performance, achievement and wellbeing, and to enhance practice within coaching'.

Our vision

Our vision is to be recognised as a leading authority on coaching psychology and to be central to the development of the profession. We aim to promote the development of coaching psychology as a professional activity and to clarify the benefits of psychological approaches within coaching practice.

We are committed to fostering excellence in coaching practice via:

  • Conferences and events
  • Publications
  • Sharing best practice
  • Supporting research
  • Representing views
  • Leading on professional development in coaching psychology
Division of Coaching Psychology

Find out more

A woman talks to people at a table
Publication

The Coaching Psychologist

Further reading about the Division of Coaching Psychology

History of the Division of Coaching Psychology

The DoCP was formed as a result of lobbying by the Coaching Psychology Forum (CPF).

CPF originally started as an internet based forum. It was founded in 2002 in response to concerns about untrained or poorly trained coaches, and the related need to promote improved standards of practice for the benefit of the profession of coaching, coaches, their clients and the public at large. In February 2003 CPF formed a working group and petitioned for the British Psychological Society to set up a group that supported psychologists who were involved in coaching practice, to enable them to focus on deepening understanding and awareness of coaching psychology as an area of psychological practice.

After almost two years, on 15 December 2004, the Executive Committee was established at the inaugural Annual General Meeting of the Special Group in Coaching Psychology (SGCP). Since the development of the SGCP, coaching psychology is developing a strong professional identity, with currently eight coaching psychology professional bodies in existence around Europe and Internationally. 

The group became a division in 2021. 

A more in depth history of the division is given in an article published in the first hard copy of The Coaching Psychologist in July 2005 (page 5).

Authors who wish to include these details in books or articles are asked to reference this article as the accurate copyrighted documentation of the division's history.

Scope of Coaching Psychology

Coaching psychology is an expanding professional discipline, and coaching psychologists work with a range of people in a variety of settings.

Specialist areas include health/wellness, executive, business, career, leadership, educational and personal coaching. 

Coaching psychology as an applied practice is known to be adopted across all domains of applied psychology as practitioners have recognised the value of the underpinning knowledge, principles and competencies that it brings. There is a growing awareness in many aspects of life of the benefits that coaching can bring to individuals and groups of people.

The defining feature of coaching psychology is that it draws on theories and evidence of the psychological mechanisms of human functioning. This psychological underpinning enables practitioners to engage with the unacknowledged or underdeveloped capacities of clients to facilitate learning, development, growth, skill sets, performance and/or levels of wellbeing.

It is a proactive, results focused, and client centred applied discipline that encourages sustainable change through new ways of thinking. It is typically a non-directive form of facilitation of learning and development and focuses clients on the present and the future to generate relevant solutions. It aims to facilitate better understanding of and better interventions to support improvement in the thinking, acting and wellbeing of human beings.

The work of a coaching psychologist is ethically, empirically and theoretically based: they adopt a scientist-practitioner perspective. This combination of empirical evidence base, theoretical understanding, use of reputable guidelines and thorough training, ensures that Chartered practitioners deliver ethical practice and interventions, whilst also seeking to evaluate their practice to enable future professional development.

As with all other professional psychologists, their work is subject to ethical, cultural, and reflective practice in collaborative supervision, to achieve service-user engagement and goals with particular populations, across diverse settings and coaching topics.

Standards in Coaching Psychology

The Standards for Coaching Psychology have been established by the society to set out the standards of knowledge, conduct and practice required by those wishing to gain Chartered status in Coaching Psychology and recognition as a Chartered Coaching Psychologist.

The key aim of these standards is to ensure Chartered Psychologists in coaching psychology will:

  • be effective, reflective, ethically sound, resourceful and informed practitioners able to work in a variety of contexts with a variety of individual, group and organisational clients
  • be able to make informed, autonomous judgements on complex issues, often in unpredictable environments and in the absence of complete data
  • embody the creative, interpretive, personal and innovative aspects of coaching psychology, including detailed understanding of applicable perspectives and techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry
  • demonstrate and commit to ongoing personal and professional development and inquiry, contributing substantially to the development of new techniques, ideas or approaches
  • understand, develop and apply models of psychological inquiry for the creation and interpretation of new knowledge and professional practice of a quality to satisfy peer review, extend the forefront of the discipline and merit publication
  • appreciate the significance of the wider social, cultural and political domains in which coaching psychologists operate
  • adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes coaching psychology

The standards are at doctoral level (level 8) which conforms to the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) D-level descriptors and describes the level of achievement which can be expected for doctoral level training. In order to ensure that successful applicants meet the level required, the doctoral level descriptors are embedded in the competencies which underpin the standards.

These standards cover all of the competencies required for recognition as a Chartered Coaching Psychologist. They therefore incorporate the knowledge and skills required at Masters Level, as well as the additional knowledge and skills required at Doctoral level. The D level standards are embedded in the competencies where relevant.

It is important to be aware that demonstration of alignment with these standards through the society’s professional recognition route will not result in the award of a doctorate. However, it will  demonstrate that you are operating at this level of competence.

This will be demonstrated by your ability to conceptualise, design and carry out work that contributes significant new knowledge and/or understanding in coaching psychology and your ability to make informed judgements on complex issues in specialist fields and take an innovative approach to tackling and solving problems.

View the Standards for Coaching Psychology (Level 8) 

The DoCP Committee

The DoCP is formed of a main committee and supported by members who sit on Sub-Committees and working party groups. 

The committee is made up of volunteers who are committed to the development of the profession, and to providing our members with numerous valuable benefits, including:

  • CPD events
  • Annual conference
  • Reduced rates at other events
  • Ethics advice
  • Two free publications
  • Peer Practice Groups

The committee

Chair: Jonathan Passmore                                                                                                            

Past Chair: Laura Rees-Davies

Honorary Treasurer: Michael Webster

Honorary Secretary: Natalie Lancer

Research Lead: Catherine Steele

Committee Members

  • Andrea Giraldez-Hayes
  • Anthony Page
  • Jenny Lynden
  • Kazia Anderson
  • Marie Stopforth
  • Paula Dixon
  • Theresa Quinn
  • Tia Moin
  • Yi Ling Lai
  • Beth McManus

TCP Editor: David Tee

ICPR Editor:  Yi Ling Lai

PsyPAG Representative: Beth McManus

DoCP 2021 - 2026 Strategy

Our aim is to advance the science and practice of coaching psychology, embracing members, clients and organisations in the UK and globally.

Publications

The Coaching Psychologist

A collection of papers that make significant and original contributions to the field of coaching psychology. 

Download

International Coaching Psychology Review

A collection of papers that make significant and original contributions to the field of coaching psychology.

Download

In practice

Ethics challenge: what would you do?

Read examples of ethical challenges to test out your ethical navigation.

There is no one solution to this situation. As you think about it, be aware of what you are taking into account as you decide what you would do? Why are you taking these things into account? What other perspectives are there?

Challenge 

Here is a hypothetical situation that you may find relevant to your practice, or presented in supervision. What is happening here? What are the main areas to enquire into, to support learning and to help navigation of new ways of working.

The context: 

The coach, Jon, has a strong track record, working as an executive coach for more than 10 years. They have a robust coaching profile and firm relationships with a number of successful client organisations. Their typical client is one who is very senior. Along with many others in the coaching world, the coach has a presence on a number of social networking sites including LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. 

Part of Jon’s practice is to gain structured feedback from coaching clients. More recently, this had frequently led to a number of recommendations on LinkedIn. A number of colleagues have commented on the value of the recommendations as a way of marketing. 

More recently, Jon has connected with current individual clients, and has sent the odd coaching question, via the social networking media. 

A specific situation within this: 

One of Jon’s client organisations has chosen not to re-engage him as part of their coaching panel. The reason given? Too high a Social Networking profile.

Some considerations: 

  • How certain are you of the privacy around your Social Networking profile(s)? 
  • How might your use of Social Networking sites align with your coaching practice? 
  • What could the issues be here from a client perspective? 
  • What impact might a high Social Networking profile have on practice? 
  • What impact might high Social Networking use have on perceptions of professional distance/proximity between coaches and their clients? 
  • What in your own practice is similar/different to the context presented? 
  • To what extent do you think communication through Social Networking is governed by norms familiar to you from other forms of communication?

Note: All individuals and organisations described are fictitious.

Thanks to Dr Alison Whybrow for this example. It is a provocation for reflective practice and does not constitute advice. Alison is a practicing coach and a past chair of the SGCP.

Note: You can discuss this with peers by putting across your own ideas and hearing others ideas at the interactive ethics forums. If you have not used the interactive forums before you will be required to create a profile, which takes just a few minutes. 

Previous Ethical Challenges

Here are some partial notes from a situation that a coach has brought to supervision.

What went wrong? What are the main areas to enquire into, to help ensure a good outcome this time and prevent something similar on another occasion?

The background:

The coach has a long and happy association with a mid size management services company. The coach traditionally provided training, team development and consultancy type services internally for this company, on a contract basis. 

Then, an influential company director with whom the coach has a good relationship, proposed that each senior manager in his department receive 5 one-hour sessions from this coach. This was to be a trial period, based on the director knowing that the coach thought one-to-one coaching would add value and would be interested to provide it. The senior director has not been coached, nor has coaching been available in the company before. A price was agreed and the deal was done! 

A specific situation within this: 

Stuart is one of the senior managers. Introduced to the coach, he was overjoyed to be receiving some exclusive one-to-one coaching, something that he had been requesting for over a year since his promotion.

Session 1: The coach understands that Stuart is clearly under a lot of pressure in terms of accountabilities and achieving his performance targets, something that is causing him real anxiety. However, the session goes well. 

After the first session, the company director calls the coach in for an update. The coach gave a positive view, without going into detail. But the coach left wondering if there was perhaps some history about his coachee that was not being shared. 

Session 2: While the coach felt that the session with Stuart went well, he was again pulled in to give an account of progress. The director made clear his view that Stuart was failing consistently in achieving his targets and that if he was not ‘fixed’ he would be out of a job.

Session 3: This session did not go well and was cut short. 

This is the point at which the coach brought the issue to supervision. 

Some considerations:

  • At what point in this story did you spot a warning sign? 
  • What hasn’t been said that needs to be said? To who? From who? 
  • What would you have done differently and why?
  • Who are the clients in this story? Stepping in to their shoes, what has each ‘signed up’ to? 
  • Who has influence over who in this story? Of what type? What are the consequences? 
  • Who in this story knows what coaching might involve or lead to? 

Thanks to Derek Ross, the former peer practice group co-ordinator, for this example. It is a provocation for reflective practice and does not constitute advice. 

Safety For All When Pressure Points Emerge 

You are coaching a senior manager, Peter, in a coaching series arranged through the HR department. The reason he has been offered coaching and you were engaged is that his role has changed (and expanded) significantly following a merger between two organisations, and this is seen as a good way of helping him adjust to the new landscape and set priorities - as well as deal with an increased workload. 

You have seen him for three sessions so far. In the most recent one he referred to big arguments with his wife (but didn’t want to elaborate) and that he was having trouble sleeping. Most of the session focused on work related issues. 

His immediate line manager, a director of the company, has contacted you. She is concerned about Peter and told you that he has started behaving out of character: ignoring staff in his team; upsetting a client and turning his phone off for prolonged periods when out of the office. 

This director wants to meet you to talk this through, "particularly as you’re a psychologist and all of this has started since you started coaching him." You think you detect a note of accusation in her voice although she says she wants to work with you to help Peter.

What will you do? 

Considerations might include: 

  • How do you decide if/when to refer to a more clinical or therapeutic practitioner? If you did decide that, how would you do it?
  • How will you use supervision? 
  • What form of contracting took place at the outset? 
  • What ‘inklings’/ flags are you aware of? What are you options for testing them? 
  • What might you say to Peter? To the line manager? To HR? 

Thanks to Sarah Dale, CPsychol for this example Sarah leads the Nottingham-based Peer Practice Group 

Relationship Management 

You are contacted by a commercial organisation wanting to get to know some coaches to add to their supplier resource. They want you to provide a set of three sessions to one of their managers so they can assess if you are the right kind of coach for them. They would like you to provide this for expenses only. What is your response? 

Some considerations:

  • Imagine you accept. You tell a colleague about this. He has declined because he doesn’t think that it’s appropriate to provide a valuable service for free, and doing so devalues his services and those of fellow practitioners. What is your response?
  • Imagine you accept. You tell a colleague about this. He says he explained to the organisation the drawbacks he could see in their assessment process. You somewhat agree, but they didn’t, and didn’t continue with their interest in him. What is your response?
  • Imagine you decline. Six months later a colleague tells you that not only do they have work with this organisation but it’s been going so well that she has been recommended by them to two other organisations and she is really enjoying the work. What is your response?
  • There are a variety of situational factors that may impact your choices. They include and are undoubtedly not limited to: your view on the business of the organisation and whether you are interested to serve this business, your view on whether you have sufficient work currently, your view on whether the proposed scheme will demonstrate your value to the organisation in their view or allow you to assess it in your own view, your career stage and needs in relation to breadth of experience, your view on whether the proposed scheme will deliver what the organisation hopes it will and your knowledge/ability to discuss alternatives, your view on money and fees for your time.
  • There are many stakeholders you may perceive in this situation. They include and are likely not limited to: you, your business or associates, fellow practitioners, the organisational ‘commissioning’ individual and their wider department, their line manager, the managers taking part in this scheme, the wider organisation.

Thanks to Julie Allan, CPsychol for this example 

Shifting Boundaries 

You have recently started coaching a member of a corporate management team. The organisation is realising its need has evolved and is now asking you to coach other team members. Do you take on other members of that same team? 

Would your answer be different if the team appointed you to work with all of them?

Or if you had been asked at the start to work with several members?

Or if you had been coaching the chief executive and at some point in your coaching he decided his team could benefit from coaching by you too.

Think through what your options would be, the conversations you might choose to have and why.

Thanks to Jonathan Passmore for this example

Showing respect? 

You receive an email-shot from a member of your profession, highlighting their services. You don't know them personally, however you think the material carries an implicit prejudice towards a particular group. You re-read it, wondering if you are mistaken.

Do you take any action? If so, what?

Do you unsubscribe? Do you seek others' views. Do you introduce yourself to the practitioner and explain your view? Do you contact any official body? If so, which one?

Is your answer different if you are yourself a member of the group in question?

Is your answer different if you know the individual to have a high profile? Or is it different if you know them?

Think through what options you might take and the conversations that would ensue.

Thanks to Julie Allan for this example

Ethics review and independent research with human participants

We recognise that where a researcher is working independently from any organisation that has an established, formal ethics review process it can be difficult to know how to proceed if the researcher is seeking a review for their project.

Peer Practice Groups

Our DoCP Peer Practice Groups in Coaching Psychology bring our members together to share information and ideas, and support each other in the appropriate use of psychology in coaching.

About coaching psychology

A day in the lift: coaching psychology

A day in the life of a coaching psychologist might vary from person to person depending where they work.

In this video we share a five minute interview with Cornelia Lucey ,BA (Hons), QTS & PGCE, MA, MSc, who provides an example of her experience of a typical day.

Cornelia is a member of the SGCP and part of the BPS working group developing accreditation standards in coaching psychology education.

She is also the co-founder of leadership consultancy; Livewise.

Achievement Award for Distinguished Contributions to Coaching Psychology

Overview and criteria

Overview

This high profile achievement award is aimed at psychologists who have made an outstanding contribution to coaching psychology.

The award is made in recognition of the achievements of a psychologist who is either currently making, or who has already made, an unusually significant contribution to the field of coaching psychology.

Assessment Criteria

The nomination process:

  • Nominees need to be a member of the DoCP and have at least Graduate Basis for Chartership with the Society 
  • Nominations for this award can be made by a member of the DoCP. However, people cannot nominate themselves
  • Nominations should take the form of a narrative (max. 250 words) supported by two referees prepared to provide testimony if the nomination is short-listed
  • Nominations will only be accepted for named individuals

Please note:

  • An individual can only receive this award once
  • An unsuccessful nominee will not be reconsidered for two years after the initial nomination (for example, a person nominated in 2017 would not be eligible for reconsideration until 2019).
  • Individuals will not be considered for more than one DoCP award in any one year
  • Up to one award winner only will be selected to receive this award in any one year
Panel

The award winner will be selected by an Awards Committee whose decision is final.

The award will be presented at the DoCP Coaching Psychology Workshops & Conference. The recipient should ensure that they are able to attend the Conference.

Recipient of award will receive 

The winner of the Distinguished Contributions Award winner will receive a complimentary place at the DoCP Coaching Psychology Workshops & Conference where the award will be presented (Attendance at the conference will be free of charge for the award winner. However, it will be responsibility of the awarded winner to cover their travel costs, accommodation and any other expenses incurred).

How to apply

Applications now closed.

Previous winners

2013
  • Alison Whybrow
  • Anthony Grant
  • Siobhan O'Riordan
  • Tatiana Bachkirova

Research Award

Overview and criteria

Overview

As part of our commitment to encouraging and supporting coaching psychology research, the Division of Coaching Psychology offers an award for coaching psychologists who are actively involved in research as either an academic or practitioner. 

The winner of the DoCP Research Award is made in recognition of a distinguished, completed research project in coaching psychology.

Assessment Criteria

Submissions for this award can be made by the person who has completed the research study or by a third party who wishes to recommend the individual for the Research Award. Nominations will only be accepted for named individuals.

The award will be made to the person whose research is deemed to make the most valuable contribution to the field of coaching psychology. Innovation will be considered alongside scientific rigour in the conception, design and analysis of the study. The award winner will be selected by an Awards Committee whose decision is final.

The project must represent the independent work of the researcher. 

The recipient of this award is likely to be a member of the DoCP (although this is not essential). 

Please note that individuals will not be considered for more than one DoCP award in any one year.

Recipient of award will receive

The winner of the DoCP Research Award is made in recognition of a distinguished, completed research project in coaching psychology.

The winner will receive:

  • A complimentary place at the DoCP Coaching Psychology Workshops & Conference* where the award will be presented (attendance at the conference will be free of charge for the award winner. However, it will be responsibility of the award winner to cover their travel costs, accommodation and all other expenses) 
  • The opportunity to present their research at the conference
  • The opportunity to promote their research through the publications edited by the DoCP

How to apply

Nominations should consist of a succinct summary of the project (approximately 2,000 words) with a clear indication of the results obtained as well as a statement relating to impact. The judges reserve the right to request data to substantiate the findings reported. Nominations should also state why the project is worthy of consideration for the Research Award. If you are the proposer of your own research study, you will need to provide contact details of a third party who can verify the details of the project you are submitting. 

Applications now closed.

Previous winners

  • 2012 - Jonathan Passmore

Student project award

Overview and criteria

Overview

As part of our commitment to encouraging and supporting coaching psychology research, the Division of Coaching Psychology offers a Student Project Award. 

Assessment Criteria

Submissions for this award can be made by the person who has completed the research study or by a third party who wishes to recommend the individual for the Research Award. Nominations will only be accepted for named individuals.

The award will be made to the person whose research is deemed to make the most valuable contribution to the field of coaching psychology (a high number of submissions may result in more than one award representing different levels of study: undergraduate, master’s and doctoral level research projects). Innovation will be considered alongside scientific rigour in the conception, design and analysis of the study. The award winner will be selected by an Awards Committee whose decision is final.

Nominations should consist of a succinct summary of the project (approximately 2,000 words) with a clear indication of what was achieved. The judges reserve the right to request data to substantiate the findings reported. Nominations should also state why the project is worthy of consideration for the Student Project Award. 

The project must be complete, represent the independent work of the student and be accompanied by a reference from the student’s supervisor. 

Please note that individuals will not be considered for more than one DoCP award in any one year.

Recipient of award will receive

The winner of the DoCP Student Project Award is made in recognition of a distinguished, completed research project in coaching psychology conducted whilst undertaking a formal course of study in coaching psychology.

The winner will receive:

  • A complimentary place at the DoCP Coaching Psychology Workshops & Conference where the award will be presented (attendance at the Conference will be free of charge for the award winner. However, it will be responsibility of the awarded winner to cover their travel costs, accommodation and any other expenses)
  • The opportunity to present their research at the Conference
  • The opportunity to promote their research through the publications edited by the DoCP
  • A £500 prize 

The recipient of this award will be eligible for student status of the British Psychological Society and membership of the DoCP and is currently, or has been within the last two years on an undergraduate, postgraduate or doctoral programme of study.

How to apply

Applications are now closed. 

Previous winners

2019

Congratulations to Natalie Lancer from Birkbeck, University of London, who is the winner of the 2019 Student Project Award.

Natalie’s PhD research, ‘Navigating the tensions of undergraduate life: an existential, phenomenological analysis of personal growth and the role of coaching at a UK university’ highlighted a little known application of coaching and how it may pre-empt mental health issues developing in students.

We look forward to hearing how her research develops.

2012:
  • Doctoral Level - Angelina Bennett
  • Masters Level - Belinda Ryding

Doctoral grants

Overview and criteria

Overview:

For students undertaking postgraduate or doctoral research. Grants are available to support research in the area of coaching psychology, funds can be used for any resources needed to conduct the research.

Assessment criteria 

Scroll to see more >
Competence     To what extent does this person’s work demonstrate excellence or the potential for excellence in research methodology (for example using innovative techniques)
Influence     To what extent does this person’s research have the potential to contribute to knowledge, practice or policy?  
Science       To what extent is this person producing quality research? (for example gaining quality samples, addressing real world problems etc).  For research in the early stages of development this will be assessed by examining the research proposal.
Visibility     To what extent does this person’s research have the potential to demonstrate the value of Coaching Psychology?
Scroll to see more >

 

Successful grant winners will be required to provide an annual update to the research sub-committee and when the work is completed, prepare an article for the ICPR.  (Awards will be made after submission to ICPR)

How to apply

Applications will open on 1 July 2022 and close 30 November 2022.

Students should submit an overview of the research and the reason funds are required, the research supervisor must approve the application and give a statement of support.

Every month, host, Dr Natalie Lancer, Chartered Psychologist and Chair of the Division of Coaching Psychology, brings you a conversation with a panel of selected experts where we talk about specialised coaching topics that will directly impact your work as a coach.

We would love to hear your thoughts on the podcast, so please email us at [email protected]

 

Episodes

Episode 1

What has psychology got to do with coaching?

In this episode Dr Natalie Lancer explores ‘What has Psychology got to do with coaching?’ with Professor Jonathan Passmore, Dr Nancy Doyle and Dr Sandra Diller. We tease out what Psychology can usefully bring to coaching in a field that is unregulated and rapidly evolving, by asking:

  • What training should coaches have in ethical decision making?
  • What is the importance of evidence-based research to coaching practice?
  • How critical is it for coaches to review their own practice?
  • In what ways can coaches share their knowledge to develop training for the coaching community?
  • To what extent can coaches collaborate on research studies?
  • How does applying research feed into coaches’ own professional development?

Hear how you can develop your coaching practice from today’s panel of experts:

  • Dr Nancy Doyle is an Occupational and Coaching Psychologist.  She founded Genius Within, a social enterprise whose services include productivity and career coaching for around 4000 neurodivergent adults, worldwide each year.  

  • Dr Sandra Diller is a certified coach (University of Salzburg, CoBeCe), trainer (LMU Munich), and mentor (LMU Munich, Center of Leadership and People Management). While working as a coach and trainer, she researches on coaching, training, mentoring, and leadership and teaches personnel and leadership development at the University of Salzburg and University of Seeburg.

  • Professor Jonathan Passmore is Senior Vice-President of CoachHub and is a Professor at Henley Business School. He is a Chartered Psychologist and an accredited coach with the ICF and EMCC, as well as holding qualifications in team coach and coach supervision.

  • Dr Natalie Lancer is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected].org.uk

Episode 2

Does coaching work?

In this episode Dr Natalie Lancer explores ‘Does coaching work?’ with Dr Gil Bozer, Dr Rebecca Jones and Dr Yi-Ling Lai.

We find out what Coaching Psychology research studies have revealed to us about the effectiveness of coaching in today’s society and ask whether coaching can really make a difference by exploring:

  • What are the potential benefits of coaching?
  • What do we mean by contracting and why is it important?
  • How can the Return On Investment of coaching be measured?
  • How is coaching perceived differently by organisations and individuals?
  • Which coaching approaches, such as Cognitive Behavioural Coaching, Solution Focused Coaching or the GROW model, are most effective?
  • Which is better for the client: virtual or in-person coaching?
  • How can coaching help with working from home?

Hear from today’s panel of experts on how you can capitalise on Coaching Psychology research studies to evolve your coaching practice:

  • Dr Gil Bozer is a workplace coaching researcher, senior lecturer, author, and consultant. Gil is on the faculty at Sapir Academic College in Israel, where he teaches executive coaching, management, and leadership for graduate and undergraduate students. Gil’s areas of expertise include workplace coaching, talent development, and executive succession.

  • Dr Yi-Ling Lai is a Lecturer in the Department of Organisational Psychology at Birkbeck College, University of London. Prior to joining Birkbeck, she had many years’ experience as an academic and consultant. She is the Editor of BPS International Coaching Psychology Review (ICPR).

  • Dr Rebecca J Jones is an Associate Professor in Coaching at Henley Business School. She is the Programme Director for Henley’s MSc in Coaching for Behavioural Change and a Chartered Psychologist. Her research interests lie in examining the factors that influence coaching effectiveness.

  • Dr Natalie Lancer is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 3

What should I look for in a coach?

In this episode Dr Natalie Lancer explores ‘What should I look for in a coach?’ with Dr David Tee, Tia Moin and Hilary Gee.

We discuss the ins and out of finding the right coach for you by considering:

  • What to look for when seeking a credible and professional coach
  • To what extent your coach will hold you accountable
  • How much you want a coach to stretch you
  • The difference between a mentor and a coach
  • Questions to ask in a chemistry session
  • Finding the right fit between a coach and coachee
  • What are the red flags to look for when engaging with a coach
  • Different ways of measuring coaching success
  • What to expect at the ending of the coaching contract

Learn how you can a set up your coaching sessions for maximum success from our panel of experts, from a range of backgrounds:

  • Dr David Tee is a Senior Lecturer in Positive and Coaching Psychology at the University of East London, and a Visiting Fellow at the University of South Wales. He has coached, trained and supervised coaches, undertaken research, chaired conferences and consulted on all things coaching.

  • Tia Moin is a Psychologist with over 20 years of international consulting experience, developing leaders and professionals, and is currently working towards a PhD at the University of Reading. She is a Committee Member of the Division of Coaching Psychology of the British Psychological Society.

  • Hilary Gee is an Executive Coach, Learning Facilitator & Change-Catalyst. Hilary has coached and trained over several thousand people in over 500 organisations. His focus includes leadership, teamwork, culture, creativity, change and making a bigger and better impact for success. Hilary is a visiting Lead Executive Coach and Facilitator at the London Business School, a Certified Master Practitioner in NLP and is qualified in a range of psychometrics.

  • Dr Natalie Lancer is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 4

How do coaches work race?

In this episode Dr Natalie Lancer examines ‘How do coaches work race?’ with Dr Terrence Maltbia, Charmaine Roche and Nankhonde Kasonde-van den Broek.

We explore how race shows up in the coaching context by debating:

  • What it would take for the world of coaching to take an anti-racist approach
  • What the implications are for coaches wanting to bring up race
  • What neutrality in coaching means and the associated ethical implications
  • How fixed and growth mindsets affect our approach to working with race
  • Why we get anxious when we talk about race
  • The challenges of tackling racism at the systemic level
  • The shortcomings of diversity work in relation to race

Learn from our panel of experts who interrogate the evidence and draw on their life experiences, to gain deeper insights into this critical topic, and hear how we must do the foundational work, in order to get to the real work of dealing with race today.

Our guests today are:

  • Dr. Terrence E. Maltbia is Associate Professor of Practice in the Department of Organization and Leadership, at Teachers College, Columbia University and also serves as Faculty Director for their Coaching Center of Excellence. He has over 30 years of diverse experience as an external and internal organizational effectiveness consultant, thought leader and educator. Terry was recognised as #1 In Coach Education in the World by Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith’s Top Global Coaches.

  • Charmaine Roche is Director of Lifeflowbalance Coaching and Consulting Ltd and an Association for Coaching Accredited Executive Coach, Coach and Leadership Supervisor, and PhD researcher at Leeds Beckett university. Charmaine focuses on the ethics of coaching for social change in oppressive contexts. She is currently engaged in a ground-breaking global research project exploring the views of Black, Indigenous, and other coaches of colour about what the world of coaching needs to do to take and anti-racist approach.

  • Nankhonde Kasonde-van den Broek is an Executive Coach, development activist and serial entrepreneur. She is the Founder and Lead Consultant at Nankhonde Kasonde Consultancy, Founder and CEO at ZANGA African Metrics. She develops affordable, accessible coaching in Africa, with over 20 years of multicultural experience supporting international organizations and Governments across multiple sectors. Nankhonde is the winner of the 2021 Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith Coaching & Mentoring award.

  • Dr Natalie Lancer is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 5

How do coaches work with nature?

In loving memory of Alison Whybrow, co-founder of the Climate Coaching Alliance.

This episode is dedicated to Alison, for being an inspiring, kind, loving, generous and courageous role model.

Her passion for our living Earth is an important legacy which she has left behind to shape how coaching can transform the ecological crisis through regeneration.

In this episode we explore ‘How do coaches work with nature?’ with Professor Peter Hawkins, Anna-Marie Watson, Karen Finn and Elsa Valdivielso Martínez.

We discuss how the growing interest in bringing the natural world into our coaching conversations is impacting coaching by asking:

  • Is coaching with nature the latest fad?
  • What do we mean by ‘coaching with nature’?
  • Why are we drawn as coaches and coachees to working with nature?
  • What does it mean to be a student of nature as a coach?
  • How can we turn nature’s obstacles, such as inclement weather, into coaching opportunities?
  • How can coaching with nature grow our capacity to deal with the unexpected?
  • How do we let nature and the wider ecology into our coaching?

Learn what is involved in coaching with nature from our panel of experts in this episode:

Peter Hawkins is Emeritus Professor of Leadership at Henley Business School and founder and Chairman of Renewal Associates.  He is a leading consultant, writer and researcher in leadership and leadership development and an international thought leader in executive teams and systemic team coaching. 

Anna-Marie Watson is a certified Performance Coach and Coach Supervisor who loves to escape the confines of four walls and take conversations into nature. As a former British Army Officer, she has worked in challenging environments from snowy Arctic tundra to hot and sandy deserts though currently resides within the rolling countryside of Wiltshire. She has a Post Graduate Certificate in Applied Coaching from the University of Derby and is certified to use psychometric-based coaching tools.

Karen Finn holds an MSc in Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology. Karen’s dissertation led to the development of the Elements Coaching Framework which considers nature within the individual as well as the individual within the ecosystem. Karen is currently studying for a Professional Doctorate in Systemic Practice. She encourages coaching clients to be in nature and or to look onto nature during audio coaching sessions. Karen volunteers with Fashion Revolution facilitating discussions on nature-positive textile policy. 

Elsa Valdivielso-Martínez is a teacher, certified coach and wellbeing practitioner. She holds an MSc with distinction in Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology. Elsa runs a nature-based coaching and training business intended to make clients aware of the impact of climate change upon  their wellbeing and to work on their emotional responses to it. She is an active member of the Coaching Climate Alliance.

Dr Natalie Lancer is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 6

How can leaders build a coaching culture?

In this episode we discuss ‘How can leaders build a coaching culture?’ with Professor David Clutterbuck, Dr Lise Lewis and Dr Dumisani Magadlela.

We learn the nuts and bolts of implementing and cultivating a coaching culture in organisations. We ask:

  • What do we mean by a ‘coaching culture’?
  • How can you identify a coaching culture?
  • How long does it take to create?
  • How can we develop psychological safety in our organisations?
  • Why is it important that the CEO adopts the role of ‘Coach Chief’?
  • What pitfalls can we avoid when creating a sustainable coaching culture?
  • How can we make a coaching culture sustainable?

Hear how your organisation can benefit from adopting a coaching culture from today’s panel of experts:

Professor David Clutterbuck is one of the early pioneers of developmental coaching and mentoring and co-founder of the European Mentoring & Coaching Council (EMCC). Author of more than 70 books, including the first evidence-based titles on coaching culture and team coaching. He leads Coaching and Mentoring International, a global network of specialist mentoring and coaching training consultants. 

Dr Lise Lewis is an accredited Master Coach, Mentor and Coach Supervisor and founder of Bluesky International, offering accredited training for coaches, mentors and coach supervisors. Her practice focuses on Relational Leadership Coaching. She is the Past President of EMCC Global 2011-2017 and currently Global Special Ambassador.

Dr Dumi Magadlela is an accredited international executive coach and accredited by the EMCC as a Senior Practitioner in Team Coaching. He is based Johannesburg, South Africa. Dumi co-founded the Ubuntu Coaching Foundation (UCF) at The Coaching Centre (TCC) in South Africa and is part-time faculty at the University of Stellenbosch Business School’s MPhil in Management Coaching.

Dr Natalie Lancer is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 7

How can I create high performance teams?

In this episode Dr Natalie Lancer explores how to create and coach high performing teams with Dr Ruth Wageman, Kirsten Dierolf and David Webster.

We dissect the coach’s role in working with teams by asking:

  • What is team coaching?
  • Why are two coaches better than one for teams?
  • What’s the difference between team coaching and one-to-one coaching?
  • What is the optimum frequency, duration and mode for team coaching?
  • What are the skills needed to coach a team?
  • What are typical team coaching interventions?
  • What are the critical questions that need to be asked when designing and coaching teams?
  • What are some of the common traps when coaching a team?

Team coaching is a sought-after, fast growing and complex area in the coaching industry. More recently, teams are operating in hybrid environments, bringing together people working in different places, both virtually and in person. Our panel of experts today discuss the critical importance of teams and how coaching can take them from good to great.

Our guests today are:

Dr Ruth Wageman is one of the foremost scholars studying and working with teams, especially leadership teams.  Ruth’s research, teaching, and practice are focused on the conditions that influence superb team performance.  Ruth especially focuses on teams that solve complex problems and lead system transformation. Ruth has been a professor at Columbia, Dartmouth, and Harvard.  Ruth co-wrote ‘Senior Leadership Teams: What it Takes to Make them Great’.

Kirsten Dierolf is the owner and founder of SolutionsAcademy, a global ICF accredited coach training academy.  She coaches executives and teams for global corporations and has designed and delivered several global initiatives for leadership development. She currently serves as the President of the German Chapter of the International Coaching Federation. Kirsten is a subject matter expert on team coaching. Kirsten is the author of ‘Solution Focused Team Coaching’.

David Webster is a Chartered Occupational & Coaching Psychologist and is the Founding Partner at Centre for Teams, London. He has been coaching teams internationally for over 20 years and, in 2018, won the CEO Magazine Management Consulting Award.  He served as Chair of the British Psychological Society’s Coaching Psychology Group 2017-2019 and formerly led the School of Coaching. David is the author of ‘Creating Adaptable Teams: From the Psychology of Coaching to the Practice of Leaders.

Your host, Dr Natalie Lancer, is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 8

How can coaching help me to be more creative?

In this episode Dr Natalie Lancer explores and discusses with Stephanie Wheeler, David Love and Anna Sheather how a creative-based approach to coaching can support others.

We consider how coaching can help people be more creative and what that means by asking:

  • What does it mean for the coach to take a creative approach to their coaching?
  • What are the benefits for the coachee of exploring and expanding their own creativity?
  • Which creative techniques can we use to facilitate the generation of insights for coachees?
  • How does a sense of playfulness enhance the coaching relationship?
  • What does it mean to empower clients without censoring their creative explorations?
  • How do we create a safe space in which clients can experiment?
  • How can we own our creative voice as a coach and support others to do the same?
  • What are the ways in which we can apply outcomes from creative coaching sessions to specific real-world situations?
  • How might organisations benefit from a more creative coaching approach?
  • How do we encourage clients to sustain and leverage their creative insights?

Bringing a sense of playfulness and creativity to the coaching relationship and environment has attracted recent interest and research.

Our panel of experts discuss how taking a creative approach benefits both individuals and organisations.

Our guests today are:

Stephanie Wheeler is an ICF accredited coach, working with executives, leaders and emerging leaders. She holds an MSc in Coaching & Behavioural Change and is also a research supervisor on the Masters in Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology (MAPPCP) at the University of East London. Stephanie is the co-author of a research article examining the impact of Lego® Serious Play® on team cohesion, collaboration and psychological trust and is co-writing a book on creative, playful and imaginative coaching conversations. Stephanie co-delivers team workshops and coaching sessions on playfulness, creativity and imagination in work.

David Love is a leadership coach, coach supervisor, cartoonist and author, working with senior and middle managers in the public services. He believes in the power of creativity for finding innovative solutions to leadership challenges – from day-to-day dilemmas to the major issues needing urgent attention such as inequality and the climate emergency. David spent four years as a Visiting Tutor at Henley Business School, teaching on the Master’s-level Professional Certificate in Executive Coaching Programme. David co-authored Advanced Coaching Practice – Inspiring Change in Others, which included a chapter on creative methods.

Anna Sheather is an accredited APECS Master Executive Coach and coach supervisor. She has been increasingly drawn to combining her passion for art with her passion for coaching.

Anna owns ‘Art in Coaching’, a platform for sharing her art-based practice and research through writing, workshops, coaching and supervision.  Anna also speaks about and runs sessions on art-based coaching and supervision including sessions for the AC, APECS, the Global Supervisors’ Network and Coaching at Work. She has recently published ‘Coaching Beyond Words – Using Art to Deepen and Enrich Our Conversations’.

Your host, Dr Natalie Lancer, is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 9

How can I become a coaching psychologist?

In this episode, Dr Natalie Lancer and her hand-selected panel comprising Alison Clarke, Professor Sarah Corrie and Dr Marie Stopforth, explore a variety of pathways to become a Chartered Coaching Psychologist.

We consider the importance of Chartership by discussing:

  • The distinction between coaching, clinical psychology, coaching, counselling and therapy
  • How the profession of Coaching Psychology evolved
  • The areas in which Coaching Psychologists work
  • How Coaching Psychology contributes to improving coaching standards and other types of psychology
  • The importance of considering the scope and limitations of our knowledge through regular supervision and Continuing Professional Development
  • How Coaching Psychology is well-placed to challenge psychological assumptions and boundaries
  • The two different types of accreditation offered by the British Psychological Society

Coaching Psychology can be described as the scientific study and applied understanding of individuals’ and groups’ performance, achievement and wellbeing in a coaching context.

As the profession of Coaching Psychology has evolved, new routes to British Psychological Society Chartership have been developed.

Today’s panel of experts are amongst the pioneers of Coaching Psychology. Our guests are:

Alison Clarke is a Coaching Psychologist specialising in transforming anxiety and restoring confidence. She has decades of experience in training and development, coaching individuals and groups, and management consulting and service innovation. As Chair of the BPS Practice Board, she hopes that the accredited training pathways for Coaching Psychology will shift the balance of the influence of Psychology away from ‘What’s wrong with you?’ to ‘What’s possible for you?’.

Professor Sarah Corrie is a Chartered Psychologist, Registered Coaching Psychologist and Consultant Clinical Psychologist. She was the recipient of the British Psychological Society’s Achievement Award for Distinguished Contributions to Coaching Psychology. Sarah has authored over 80 articles for academic journals, professional journals and trade magazines, and nine books including The Art of Inspired Living: Coach Yourself with Positive Psychology. Sarah is a Founder Member and former Chair of the British Psychological Society's Special Group in Coaching Psychology. She has a particular interest in how coaching might contribute to emotional well-being and mental health.

Dr Marie Stopforth is a Chartered Psychologist, HCPC Registered Sport and Exercise Psychologist, and BPS Registered Coaching Psychologist. She is the Professional Development lead in the BPS Division of Coaching Psychology. Marie spent 20 years working in Higher Education, including as Programme Leader of the Master’s in Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology programme at the University of East London. She now runs her own coaching business where she provides coaching to individuals and training to organisations, as well as offering Coaching Psychology courses and supervision.

Your host, Dr Natalie Lancer, is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Episode 10

How is coaching changing for the future?

In the final episode for this first series, your host, Dr Natalie Lancer, and guests Wei-Ying Chen, Matti Niebelschuetz and Will Foussier discuss how coaching is changing from an organisational and technological perspective.

In this episode we discuss:

  • Why coaches will never be replaced by AI and technology
  • How digital technologies can make coaching accessible to more people
  • The benefits and challenges that new technologies bring to coaching
  • How to know whom to coach in an organisation to maximise impact
  • The importance of an organisation investing in coaching the whole person rather than just their professional persona
  • How to strike the balance between performance management and psychological safety
  • The management and responsibility of collecting data in digital coaching
  • The scale of coaching in the next ten years

In some respects, coaching is in its infancy and is being influenced by emerging technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI).

At the same time, organisations have used coaching to adapt quickly to a rapidly changing global context which includes flexible working, greater diversity in teams and investing in individuals’ personal and professional development.

Our experts are:

Wei-Ying Chen is the Founder of COACHLAB, an e-learning tool to enable organisations to embed a coaching culture. After graduating from Cambridge University, Wei started his career in management consulting. COACHLAB has since supported line managers across the globe from small startups to large multinationals with a simple tool that adds structure to conversations and helps managers ask the right questions to empower their teams.

Matti Niebelschuetz is Managing Director and Founder of CoachHub, a platform designed to democratise coaching for employees at all career levels worldwide by offering live coaching sessions via video. CoachHub prepares managers for better leadership, team and group performance through coaching. Matti is an entrepreneur and former management consultant at McKinsey Digital with 15 years of experience in startups and creating digital businesses.

Will Foussier founded AceUp.com with the desire to help professionals at all levels realise their potential, by giving them easy access to science-based, transformational coaching delivered by experts, enabled by technology and backed by data. He is a Forbes 30U30 and Harvard alumnus with a background in social-impact investment. Will believes in driving positive change for people, organisations, and their communities.

Your host, Dr Natalie Lancer, is a Chartered Psychologist, coach and supervisor. She is the Deputy Chair and Secretary of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Coaching Psychology and an accredited member of the Association for Coaching. She is the host of this podcast series and invites you to email any comments to [email protected]

Join the division

Membership of the Division of Coaching Psychology (DoCP) is only open to members of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

Apply to join the DoCP (students, affiliates, e-subscribers)

Apply to join the DoCP (general member)

There are three grades of the Division membership:

Full membership - £18

For fully qualified psychologists who are eligible for Chartered Status.

In Training Member - £15

For psychologists in-training who hold Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership and are working towards chartered status and full Divisional Membership.

The Full Membership and In-Training Membership grades are currently not open to new members. Once the training routes for Coaching Psychology have been established these will be available. New members should join as General Members

General Member - £15

For members of the society who are not currently eligible for the above grades.

Becoming a full Divisional member of the new Division

Peer review route

The Peer review route is open to existing Chartered members who were on the Register of Coaching Psychologists on the 1st November 2021 (or who were eligible for inclusion in the register on that date).

Applicants must be undergoing supervision of their coaching psychology practice appropriate to their work, and must hold current professional indemnity insurance (or be covered by an employer’s provision).

Applicants meeting these criteria have the opportunity to apply for transfer to full Divisional membership of the new Division.

Candidates will submit a transfer form including three 500-word statements about aspects of their practice and research along with a CV, CPD record, selected supporting evidence, and evidence of meeting the eligibility criteria.

Eligible applicants will engage in a peer review of colleagues’ submissions in determining their suitability for transfer. These conversations will take place with reference to the Level 8 Standards in Coaching Psychology.

Successful applicants will be eligible for full Divisional membership of the Division of Coaching Psychology and will be upgraded to full Divisional member status free of charge for the remainder of their subscription year.

This route will be open until 31 December 2023.

Check this is the right route for you

The accompanying flowchart is intended to assist in identifying which route is most appropriate for a candidate, given their existing status and experience.

If you do not meet the criteria for the Peer review route, you may still be eligible for the Accelerated route to full Divisional membership, if you hold GBC and have five years’ experience in Coaching Psychology.

Application

Read the Peer Review Route applicant guidelines.

Candidates wishing to apply for transfer will need to complete the application form below.

An application fee of £199.92 + VAT (£239.90 inc. VAT) is payable.

Once the application fee has been processed, and eligibility for the route confirmed, applicants will be provided with access to the route via BPS Learn. They will then be able to download all relevant forms and documentation in order to prepare their submission for peer review.

Becoming a Chartered Member of the BPS through coaching psychology

1. BPS Qualification in Coaching Psychology Stage One and Two (in development)

  • Stage One: A BPS accredited Masters degree in Coaching Psychology.  We are currently working with Higher Education partners towards accrediting a number of Masters programmes in coaching psychology
  • Stage Two: A BPS Qualification.  We are currently developing a 2 year doctoral level qualification which will lead to eligibility for Chartered membership of the Society, and full Divisional membership of the Division of Coaching Psychology

2. Professional recognition route

A professional recognition route has been developed in order to recognise the professional training and experience of those who have significant training and experience in coaching psychology, but who are not already Chartered members of the BPS.  All those wishing to achieve full Divisional membership will be required to demonstrate alignment with the Level 8 Standards in Coaching Psychology.

  • Full professional recognition route (permanent route)

    The Professional Recognition route will be available to all members holding GBC who have at least three years training and experience in coaching psychology. Candidates will be required to submit a full portfolio of evidence demonstrating alignment with each element of the Level 8 Standards in Coaching Psychology. Successful applicants will achieve both Chartered Member status of the society and full Divisional membership of the Division of Coaching Psychology

    A closed pilot is currently underway to inform the final shape of this route.

    This route is planned to open in autumn 2022.

  • Accelerated route (temporary route)

    The Accelerated route is an abbreviated version of the full Professional Recognition route, and is available for members who hold GBC and who are already able to demonstrate five years full time (or part-time equivalent) experience as a coaching psychologist.

    Candidates will be required to submit a reduced portfolio demonstrating alignment with the top-level standards in the Level 8 Standards in Coaching Psychology and specific second-tier standards that address ethical autonomous practice.

    Successful applicants will achieve both Chartered Member status of the Society and full Divisional membership of the Division of Coaching Psychology.

    This route is currently open and will remain open until 31st December 2024.

In both cases, applicants must be undergoing supervision of their coaching psychology practice and be able to demonstrate 8 sessions within the last 2 years, and must hold current professional indemnity insurance (or be covered by an employer’s provision).

Which is the right route for you?

The accompaning flowchart is intended to assist in identifying which route is most appropriate for a candidate, given their existing status and experience.

If you already hold Chartered Member status and you are on the Register of Coaching Psychologists (or you believe you were eligible to be on the Register in November 2021) then you may be eligible for the Peer review route to full Divisional membership.

Application

Read the Accelerated Route applicant guidelines.

Candidates wishing to apply for the Accelerated Route will need to complete the application form below.

An application fee of £744.88 + VAT (£893.86 inc. VAT) is payable. Once the application fee has been processed, and eligibility for the route confirmed, applicants will be provided with access to the route via BPS Learn.

They will then be able to download all relevant forms and documentation in order to prepare their submission.

Apply for the Accelerated Route for Full Divisional Membership 

Benefits of belonging

DoCP member benefits

  • Attend and present at conferences, symposia and workshops
  • Be part of a dynamic, multi-disciplinary network focused around our common interest in supporting the achievement of human potential through the provision of coaching psychology services.
  • Membership delegate rates at DoCP events, webinars and conferences
  • Opportunities for non-psychologist coaches to engage with the psychological community of practice
  • Periodic discounts arranged with other related event organisers and publishers
  • Receive two regular Coaching Psychology Publications: The Coaching Psychologist (TCP) and The International Coaching Psychology Review (ICPR).

Member announcement email list

The Division of Coaching Psychology uses its membership announcement email list to inform its members of activities and initiatives that are relevant to their interests and to make requests for engagement on topical issues. 

By becoming a member of the Division you are automatically added to the announcement list.

To receive these emails you will need to:

  1. become a member of the Division of Coaching Psychology
  2. opt into receiving email communication and provide a working email address

These preferences can be updated by logging into your member portal.

If you have any queries, please contact Member Network Services

To assist us in responding to your query please make sure to include your membership number and quote 'Division of Coaching Psychology announcement email' in the subject line.

Getting involved with the DoCP

The Division of Coaching Psychology relies on a wide range of people getting involved, and the work of the Division is largely achieved through the dedication of unpaid volunteers.

Our volunteers come from a wide range of different backgrounds, whether they be practitioners or academics, or full members or in-training members, and together form an open and inclusive community.

For further information please contact Member Network Services