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DCP Faculty of the Psychology of Older People

Established in 1980 the Faculty of the Psychology of Older People provides a forum for psychologists to exchange information, ideas and expertise about psychological approaches with older people.

About

The Faculty of the Psychology of Older People provides a forum for psychologists with an interest in work with older people.

Established in 1980, this group is a faculty of the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP) within the British Psychological Society (BPS).

It works to encourage the exchange of information, ideas and expertise about psychological approaches with older people.

It is a national group with members throughout the UK. 

Although primarily for Psychologists, membership of Faculty of the Psychology of Older People (FPOP) is open to individuals from other disciplines and voluntary groups who share an interest in work with older people. 

Aims

The Faculty of the Psychology of Older People's aims are as follows:

  • Advising and influencing policy and services
  • Challenging stereotypes and age discrimination
  • Collaborating with professional and voluntary groups 
  • Maintaining a forum for exchange of expert knowledge and skills 
  • Pioneering innovations in care
  • Promote research which enhances the lives of older people 
  • Providing & encouraging education and training about late life issues
  • Publicising the importance of psychological issues in how we age 
  • Supporting members at local, national and international levels 

Geographical Groups

  • East Anglia
  • Essex and Hertfordshire
  • North East
  • North Thames
  • North Wales
  • North West
  • Northern Ireland
  • Oxford
  • Scotland
  • South Thames
  • South Wales
  • South Western
  • Trent
  • Wessex
  • West Midlands
  • Yorkshire and Humberside

Workstreams

Dementia – Psychosocial Interventions

Dementia - MCI

Working psychologically in older adult inpatient services

Primary Care Psychology and Older People

Outcome Measures

Psychological Therapies and Older People

Diversity

Neurodegenerative conditions

Workstream Lead - Jane Simpson

Any queries are welcome on [email protected](link sends e-mail)

Recent publications

Mistry, K., & Simpson, J. (2013). Exploring the transitional process from receiving a diagnosis to living with motor neurone disease. Psychology and Health, 28(8), 939–953.

Simpson, J., McMillan, H., & Reeve, D. (2013). Reformulating psychological difficulties in people with Parkinson’s disease: The potential of a social relational approach to disablism. Parkinson’s Disease, 2013.

Maxted, C., Simpson, J., & Weatherhead, S. (2014). An exploration of the experience of Huntington’s disease in family dyads: An interpretative phenomenological analysis. Journal of Genetic Counseling, 23(3), 339–349.

Simpson, J., Lekwuwa, G., & Crawford, T. (2014). Predictors of quality of life in people with Parkinson’s disease: Evidence for both domain specific and general relationships. Disability and Rehabilitation, 36(23), 1964–1970.

Arran, N., Craufurd, D., & Simpson, J. (2014). Illness perceptions, coping styles and psychological distress in adults with Huntington’ s disease. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 19(2), 169–179. 

Simpson, J., & Thomas, C. (2015). Clinical psychology and disability studies: Bridging the disciplinary divide on mental health and disability. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(14), 1299–1304.

Simpson, J., McMillan, H., Leroi, I., & Murray, C. D. (2015). Experiences of apathy in people with Parkinson’s disease: A qualitative exploration. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(7), 611–619.

Barcroft, R., Simpson, J., & Butchard, S. (2016). Support for practitioners working with people with neurodegenerative disorders. Psychology of Older People: The FPOP Bulletin, 136, 21–28.

Garlovsky, J. K., Simpson, J., Grünewald, R. A., & Overton, P. G. (2016). Impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease: Predominant role of psychological determinants. Psychology & Health, 31(12), 1391–1414.

Barcroft, R., & Simpson, J. (2016). Psychological interventions for depression in people with multiple sclerosis. Psychology of Older People: The FPOP Bulletin, 136, 40–47.

Theed, R., Eccles, F. J. R., & Travers, V. (2016). Anxiety and depression in individuals with Parkinson’s disease: perspectives of the nurse specialist. British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 12(3), 132–139. 

Warren, E., Eccles, F., Travers, V., & Simpson, J. (2016). The experience of being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 12(6), 288–296.

Garlovsky, J. K., Overton, P. G., & Simpson Paul G. (2016). Psychological predictors of anxiety and depression in Parkinson’s disease: A systematic review. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 72(10), 979–998. 

Maltby, J., Dale, M., Underwood, M., & Simpson, J. (2017). Irritability in Huntington’s Disease: Factor Analysis of Snaith’s Irritability Scale. Movement Disorders Clinical Practice, 4(3), 342–348.

Regan, L., Preston, N. J., Eccles, F. J. R., & Simpson, J. (2017). The views of adults with neurodegenerative diseases on end-of-life care: a metasynthesis. Aging & Mental Health, 1–9.

Theed, R., Eccles, F., & Simpson, J. (2017). Experiences of caring for a family member with Parkinson’s disease: a meta-synthesis. Aging & Mental Health, 21(10), 1007–1016.

Regan, L., Preston, N. J., Eccles, F. J. R., & Simpson, J. (2018). The views of adults with Huntington’s disease on assisted dying: A qualitative exploration. Palliative Medicine, 32(4), 708–715.

Zarotti, N., Simpson, J., Fletcher, I., Squitieri, F., & Migliore, S. (2018). Exploring emotion regulation and emotion recognition in people with presymptomatic Huntington’s disease: The role of emotional awareness. Neuropsychologia, 112, 1–9.

Theed, R., Eccles, F. J. R., & Simpson, J. (2018). Understandings of psychological difficulties in people with the Huntington’s disease gene and their expectations of psychological therapy. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 91, 216-232.

Simpson, J., Chatzidamianos, G., Perpetuo, L., Fletcher, I., & Eccles, F.J.R. (2018). A new scale measuring adaptive perceived control for people with Parkinson's: initial construction and further validation. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 391, 77-83

Zarotti, N., Simpson, J., & Fletcher, I. (2019). “I have a feeling I can’t speak to anybody’: A thematic analysis of communication perspectives in people with Huntington’s disease. Chronic Illness, 15, 61-73. 

Zarotti, N., Fletcher, I., & Simpson, J. (2019). New perspectives on emotional processing in people with symptomatic Huntington’s disease: impaired emotion regulation and recognition of emotional body language. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 34, 610-624.

Simpson, J., Theed, R., Dale, M., Gunn, S., Zarotti, N., & Eccles, F.J.R. (2019). A critical scoping review of the concept of irritability in Huntington’s disease. Cortex, 120, 353-374.

Moore, J., Eccles, F.J.R., & Simpson, J. (in press – available online). Post-diagnostic lived experiences of individuals with essential tremor. Disability and Rehabilitation.

FPOP Bulletin

The FPOP Bulletin is the primary publication of the Faculty for the Psychology of Older People.

Find out more about the FPOP Bulletin.

Download copies of the FPOP Bulletin.

Committee

Chair

Rebecca Dow

Vice Chair (Deputy Chair)

Natasha Lord

Honorary Treasurer

Carolien Lamers

Honorary Secretary

Vacant

Bulletin Editor

Vacant

Media and Website Officer

Vacant

Geographical Group Liaison Officer

Vacant

Committee Members

  1. Polly Kaiser
  2. Katharina Reichelt
  3. Angela Smith
  4. Vacant

DCP Clinical Health Representative

Jane Simpson

DCP Pre-Qualification Group Representative

Vacant

DoN Representative

Vacant

Scottish Representative

Gillian Bowie

Northern Ireland Representative

Frances Duffy

Diversity Lead Representative

Sarah Ghani

Join

Apply to join the faculty (students, affiliates, e-subscribers)

Apply to join the faculty (graduate, chartered, and in-training members)

Membership of the Faculty of the Psychology of Older People is only open to members of the British Psychological Society.

There are three grades of faculty membership:

  • Full membership

    For psychologists who are Full Members of the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP) and who work in or have an interest or expertise in the field of psychology of older people.

  • Affiliate membership

    For psychologists who are General (Pre-Training) and In-Training members of the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP). Affiliate members may take part in discussions but may not vote.

  • Associate membership

    For General members of the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP) and non-Division members. Associate members may take part in discussions but may not vote.

If you are not already a member, you can join the faculty at the same time as applying for membership of the society.

Apply to join the society

Benefits of belonging

Benefits of DCP Faculty for the Psychology of Older People membership

Membership of the faculty provides access to several benefits including:

  • an annual conference
  • briefing papers and guidance documents
  • a regular newsletter

Member Announcement Email List

The Faculty for the Psychology of Older People uses its membership announcement email list to inform its members of activities and initiatives that are relevant to their interests and to make requests for engagement on topical issues. 

By becoming a member of the Faculty you are automatically added to the announcement list.

To receive these emails you will need to:

  1. become a member of the Faculty for the Psychology of Older People
  2. opt into receiving email communication and provide a working email address

These preferences can be updated by logging into your member portal.

If you have any queries, please contact Member Network Services.

To assist us in responding to your query please make sure to include your membership number and quote 'Faculty for the Psychology of Older People announcement email' in the subject line.

Getting involved with the Faculty for the Psychology of Older People

The Faculty for the Psychology of Older People relies on a wide range of people getting involved, and the work of the Faculty is largely achieved through the dedication of unpaid volunteers.

Our volunteers come from a wide range of different backgrounds, whether they be practitioners or academics, or full members or in-training members, and together form an open and inclusive community.