Climate justice protest

Climate and Environment Action Coordination Group

The Climate and Environment Action Coordinating Group (CEACG) sets direction, objectives and work plans for psychologically informed climate and environment work

About the Climate and Environment Action Group

The CEACG is active in coordinating and supporting the work of networks, divisions and sections and embracing inclusivity of all nations in exploring the interface between climate and environment in research and practice.

The group supports and advises on the implementation of effective climate change and environment work rooted in psychological evidence.

Focus Points:
  • Climate and environmental health and wellbeing
  • Behavioural, political and social change
  • Education and awareness inside the profession and external to the profession
  • The interface between policy, public affairs and engagement
  • The interface between climate change, human rights and inequality
Heal the world

BPS Position Statement on the Climate and Ecological Crisis

We are delighted to release for publication The BPS Position Statement on the Climate and Ecological Crisis.

CEACG Road Map

1. Organisational commitment

The CEACG will work with the BPS to:

  1. Carry out an organisational audit of The BPS and produce a sustainability statement
  2. Develop guidelines to deliver commitments from the position statement ensuring support is in place for implementation
  3. Work with The BPS to encourage and champion environment, climate and ecological work across the society.

2. Understand and address the impacts of climate and ecological crisis on health and wellbeing

(Strategic Goal - Confidence)

We will work with psychologists to:

  • Manage resultant emotions and strengthen individuals, communities and organisations capacity to adapt.
  • Help individuals and communities develop psychological resilience to enhance engagement with the climate crisis.
  • Promote research and understanding of the human and psychological dimensions of global climate and environmental change.

This will mean the CEACG working with member networks to:

  1. Produce guidance for psychologists working with individuals, groups and organisations to help them to promote awareness and constructive management of the impacts of the crisis on mental health and wellbeing.
  2. Develop guidance and events to support collective actions to engage with the crisis.
  3. Summarise and publicise relevant research and encourage further such research through BPS awards and prizes.

3. Encourage behavioural, political, and social change to provide a healthy, safe and sustainable living environment for everyone

(Strategic Goal - Champion)

We will work with psychologists to:

  • Provide research and knowledge-based interventions that create a space in which to stimulate interpersonal/public discussions.
  • Support psychologists in providing their expertise to facilitate environmentally friendly sustainable behaviours.

This will mean CEACG working with member networks to:

  1. Create guidance or toolkits that can be used by educators for example schools, course leaders etc.
  2. Create opportunities for conversations & collaborations with stakeholders including communities, policy makers and psychologists on sustainable behaviours for individual and collective action e.g., interactive events

4. Increase awareness inside and external to the profession

(Strategic Goal – Community)

We will work with psychologists to:

  • Contribute to effective educational resources, embedded in climate justice, for psychologists and the public to support their understanding of the health and wellbeing impacts of climate change, biodiversity loss, mitigation, and adaptation.
  • Support delivery of climate communications based around pro-environmental behaviours.
  • Provide research/knowledge-based interventions and create space to stimulate interpersonal/public discussions.

This will mean CEACG working with member networks to:

  1. Create, share and disseminate materials -where appropriate in collaboration with other organisations- to improve psychologists’ understanding of the relationship between climate, environment and health/wellbeing.
  2. Work with the BPS to disseminate best practice across communication channels
  3. Encourage dissemination of climate and environmental research at BPS conferences.

5. Bridge the gaps between policy, public affairs, and engagement

(Strategic Goal – Confidence)

We will work with psychologists to:

  • Increase public awareness and engagement, taking full account of the scale of the personal, social and policy changes likely to be needed.
  • Promote the role of psychology in public policy.
  • Develop closer relationships with relevant organisations, institutions, and leaders in involved in the policy making process.
  • Work with others in multi-disciplinary teams to ensure a variety of perspectives are brought to bear.
  • Build the capability, credibility, and capacity of psychologists to work in this area.

This will mean CEACG working with member networks to:

  1. Work alongside BPS staff, member networks, sections and divisions to help create innovative solutions to the sharing of best practice in public engagement.
  2. Ensure psychology has a voice in political debate, action and policy on climate and environment with relevant national government and third sector bodies.
  3. Develop relationships with external professional organisations who influence the policy making agenda on environment and climate change
  4. Develop a BPS community of environmental and climate advocates.

6. Take account of the links between climate change, human rights, and inequality

(Strategic Goal – Cultivate)

We will work with psychologists to:

  • Ensure we promote the voices of those people and communities who lack a voice in climate change impacts, adaption, and mitigation efforts.
  • Promote the voice of students, and early career psychologists.
  • Explore the broader impacts of climate and environmental change on those who carry a protected characteristic under equality law.
  • Promote balanced discussion on the socio-economic impact of change on those from disadvantaged backgrounds and communities.
  • Ensure a human rights approach to climate and environment work sits at the heart of all projects, initiatives, and discussions.
  • Promote co-production, lived experience involvement and psychologically informed mitigation and adaptations to a climate and ecologically changing world.

This will mean CEACG working with member networks to:

  1. Summarise relevant research and share evidence-based guidance to document the link between climate injustices, human rights and inequalities that marginalised communities face in the UK.
  2. Work with member networks in exploring the intersections between equality, equity, and climate change.

Climate and Environmental Action Group Members

Terri Morrissey

Chair of the Climate and Environment Action Group

Terri is a Business and Organisational Development Psychologist and co-founder of This is…an organisational development practice. She has worked with a wide range of organisations on culture and behaviour change, large systems change and also as a coach and mentor. She is also a former CEO of the Psychological Society of Ireland.

She has been involved in climate related work for a number of years. She co-facilitated, with her colleague Dr Richard Plenty, the first International Summit on Psychology and Global Health: A Leader in Climate Action, in Lisbon in 2019 and the second Summit in Bogota Columbia in 2022.  She is co-founder of the Global Psychology Alliance, an international alliance of psychological Associations gathered together to address global issues including climate change.  She represented the GPA at COP 26 in Glasgow.

She has also co-edited, the recent publication (2022) (by the New Zealand Psychological Society): Global Psychology and Climate Action a collection of writings from Psychological Societies around the world on psychology and climate action and visited New Zealand (Sept-Oct 2022) speaking to national, regional, and local politicians on climate change and action. 

She is Chair of the Innovation High Level Advisory Board for the Horizon project, Go Green Routes (2020-2024). 

She is author of many papers and conference presentations and the book: Uncertainty Rules? (2020).

She was awarded a Presidential Citation in June 2022 by the President of the American Psychological Association for her work on global psychology and climate action.

Dr Louise Edgington

Dr Louise Edgington is a practising local authority Educational Psychologist (in Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea), teaching on the UCL DECPsy programme for Educational Psychologists. She is also a  consultant for the group, 'Climate Psychologists', having worked on their 'Mind and Planet' educational programme.

Since 2019, Louise has run a working group of psychologists and delivered workshops to professionals across the country on eco-anxiety, psychological defences and barriers to action, as well as climate communication and education. 

Louise originally did a Masters in Physics at the University of Oxford -with Energy Studies and Climate Physics major options and an Internship at Bloomberg New Energy Finance. 

Dr Maria Fernandes-Jesus

Dr Maria Fernandes-Jesus is a Lecturer in Psychology at York St John University.

Her current research interests lie at the intersection between social justice and climate change, with a particular focus on community-based engagement, collective action, social movements, political imagination, and youth climate activism.

She is interested in researching these issues using mixed methods and following applied, participatory, and interdisciplinary approaches.

In 2020, she co-edited a special issue for the Community Psychology in Global Perspective Journal on ‘Communities reclaiming power and social justice in the face of climate change’.

Dr Maya Gimalova

Dr Maya Gimalova first and foremost is a citizen of the world who cares about the Planet and recognises the seriousness of the climate change issue. 

Maya is a Counselling Psychologist whose research includes exploring young climate activists' experiences of being continually exposed to climate-related information in today's world. 

Maya strives to combine her passion for psychology and her intrinsic link with nature to raise awareness and mitigate the multifaceted consequences of climate change on all living beings. In this regard, she has published articles, delivered workshops, created a Reference Library for the Division of Counselling Psychology, and provides consultations for climate-related projects.

Maya is also a member of the Division of Counselling Psychology Working Group on Climate and Environmental Crisis. 

As her day job, she works in the NHS in the Clinical Health Psychology department providing individual and group therapy. 

Dr Sarah Golding

Dr Sarah Golding is a Health Psychologist and early career researcher, with a passion for interdisciplinary, applied projects. Her work focuses on issues of public and animal health and the health benefits of engaging with nature. She has written for The Conversation about the wellbeing benefits of gardens.

Sarah has long been concerned about the threats from climate change, environmental degradation, and biodiversity loss. She strongly believes that human health and wellbeing are intertwined with animal, plant, and ecosystem health – and that psychological perspectives are needed to help mitigate and adapt to the climate and ecological emergencies.

Sarah is based in the Environmental Psychology Research Group at the University of Surrey, where she works as a Knowledge Exchange Fellow for ACCESS (Advancing Capacity for Climate and Environment Social Science). This 5-year, £6.25 million project, funded by the ESRC, is working to increase the visibility and impact of the social sciences in tackling climate and environment challenges.

Dr Stacey Heath

Dr Stacey Heath is a social psychologist and lecturer at the Open University. Stacey adopts an interdisciplinary approach to her research which seeks to understand the ways in which social psychological theories and geographical contexts can assist in the exploration of contemporary social and environmental issues.

More specifically, Stacey addresses issues related to the psychology of groups and behaviour in the context of large-scale group change such as migration, regeneration, climate change, and disasters and how these changes relate to health, wellbeing and community resilience.

Prior to returning to higher education, Stacey worked for over a decade in local government, councils, and community projects. These professional and research experiences have strengthened her conviction that effective responses to environmental and societal challenges require the adoption of a broader understanding of social sciences.

This includes incorporating multiple perspectives from researchers, policy makers, communities, charities, and businesses, in order to develop sustainable and resilient communities for the future. Stacey believes that in order to tackle current and future environmental challenges, we first need to develop our understanding about the many ways in which climate change is impacting humans, and vice versa.

Antonio Kalentzis

Antonio Kalentzis has 13 years of experience providing individual and group therapy, psychological assessments, and evaluations. He is working in his Mental Health Clinic and specializes in treating anxiety and depression in a primary care setting, using a variety of therapeutic modalities, including mixed combination psychotherapy and coaching psychology.

Also, he is committed to providing evidence-based, client-cantered care that is tailored to meet the unique needs of each individual. Furthermore, he has more than 900 teaching hours in higher education. Nowadays, he is an Instructor of Psychology in City Unity College, Greece.

Aside from his clinical experience, he is dedicated to ongoing professional development. He is a graduate member of the British Psychological Society in Divisions of Coaching Psychology and Political Psychology and a member of the International Society for Coaching Psychology.

Finally, has published two books and promotes the concept of "Psychologized," which aims to help people understand the role of psychology in their everyday lives using simple terminology. 

Ryan Kemp

Ryan Kemp is a clinical psychologist and Director of Therapies in the NHS.

Previously a chair of the Faculty of Addiction in the DCP, he currently sits on the DCP executive with responsibility for professional standards, research and sustainability.

Outside professional life, Ryan is a Quaker, a keen camper and lover of forests and rivers.

Professor Ho Chung Law

Professor Ho Chung Law was an international consultant in psychology, research & development with over 35 years of experience.

He was the first equality advisor to the Assistant Permanent Under Secretary of State in the UK Home Office Research, Development & Statistics Directorate; a pioneer of a methodology for the evidence-based evaluation of large-scale interventions using multi-level modelling and geographical information.

Ho is currently the Editor of the BPS Transpersonal Psychology Review, supervising a dozen research doctoral students, advocating a new narrative action research and the fourth generation coaching (4GC) for people, places and the planet.

Dr Melissa Marselle

Dr Melissa Marselle is a Lecturer in Environmental Psychology and a core member of University of Surrey's Environmental Psychology Research Group.

Her research focuses on nature-based interventions, the mental health benefits of biodiversity, and application of behavioural science to conservation problems

She has co-edited the book Biodiversity and Health in the Face of Climate Change, and developed a conceptual framework of the linkages between biodiversity and human health.

Collaborating with ecologists, she has examined the influence of street tree biodiversity on anti-depressant prescriptionsplant and bird species richness on mental health and birdsong on wellbeing.

For the WHO Europe, she has conducted systematic reviews examining which types and characteristics of green and blue space are most beneficial for mental health.

Melissa is a contributing author to the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services’ (IPBES) Values Assessment, and an Associate Editor of the British Ecological Society journal People and Nature.

Dr Jan Maskell

Dr Jan Maskell is a consultant Business Psychologist and Sustainability Consultant, and works with individuals and organisations helping them to develop their leadership skills and environmental management systems.

She works applying psychology to leadership and to issues such as pro-environmental behaviour change and corporate responsibility.

Jan has a doctorate from Lancaster University in Educational Research.

Dr Dan O’Hare

Dr Dan O’Hare is an educational psychologist and senior lecturer at the University Bristol where he teaches on the Doctoral professional training course for EPs. He has previously been communications lead and Chair for the Division of Educational and Child Psychology and is a current member of the BPS Member Board.

Dan’s passion is about making psychology as accessible as possible. He founded and runs edpsy.org.uk, an online magazine for anyone interested in education and psychology and which has an international reach. Dan has extensive experience of working with the media across TV, print, radio and digital channels.

Dan’s professional interests include evidence-based psychological practice, the use and misuse of neuroscience in educational psychology, and how psychology responds to the climate emergency with a particular focus on children and young people’s voice and involvement.

Dan authored the first paper for the EP profession addressing the climate crisis, children and young people. He has also blogged about the role that EP services should play in reducing their carbon footprint and how children’s environmental concerns continue to be ignored. His current work in this area focuses on local projects to access green space, with community engagement as a core principle.

Roger Paxton

Roger Paxton is a retired clinical psychologist whose last permanent post was Head of Psychological Services and Director of R&D at Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust. He was also an Honorary Senior Lecturer at Newcastle University, and had sessional commitments to NICE and several health research and service improvement networks, all aimed at promoting high standards and clinical effectiveness.

He is a past Chair of the BPS Ethics Committee, and worked with colleagues on that Committee to prioritise the climate and environment crisis, leading now to the establishment of the CEACGroup.

Since retiring he has been pursuing his interests in ethics and political psychology and philosophy. Responsibilities and social movements are important topics in these fields, both very relevant to climate and environment action.

Dr Richard Plenty

Dr Richard Plenty started life as a physicist before becoming an organisational psychologist. He works in organisation and leadership development, specialising in change, uncertainty and risk.

His book ‘Uncertainty Rules?’ written with Terri Morrissey, was published in 2020. He co- facilitated the first Global Summit of the Global Psychology Alliance (GPA)  in Lisbon in 2019, attended COP26 as part of the GPA representative team in November 2021, and co- facilitated the second GPA Summit in Bogota in 2022.

He was a member of the APA Task Force on Climate Change (2020-2022). He has four grandchildren and enjoys writing music. 

Dr Lindsey Roberts

Dr Lindsey Roberts is a Chartered Psychologist with a special interest in Human-Animal Interactions, Human Behaviour Change and the One Health Movement.

Historically Lindsey's research has evaluated medicines use and behaviour, working within and between academia, the NHS, charitable organisations and the pharmaceutical industry.

Now, Lindsey uses her knowledge of human behaviour change and animal welfare to design interventions that benefit the welfare of humans and animals collectively, with a particular focus on antibiotic stewardship that are in line with the Sustainability Development Goals.

For potential collaborations, please feel free to get in touch!

Dr Tony Wainwright

Dr Tony Wainwright is a clinical psychologist and Deputy Academic Director for the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Exeter.

He is a past chair of the British Psychological Society Ethics Committee. He chaired the Climate and Environmental Crisis Steering group that established the new CEAC group and has been a long-standing campaigner to bring the issue of climate and environmental disruption to public and professional attention.

He co-edited a special issue of the European Psychologist on psychology and the climate crisis (Volume 26/Number 3/2021) and coedited two issues of Clinical Psychology Forum in in 2020 and 2021.

He has recently co-edited a book on human rights education for psychologists and is a member of the steering group of the Global Network of Psychologists for Human Rights.  He teaches, among other things, on ethics, leadership, prevention, and public health.

Siân Williams

Siân Williams is a professional ecologist, with track record of policy development and project management in both the public and third sectors.

She is currently employed by NatureScot (Scotland’s nature agency), focussing on partnership delivery of projects which address biodiversity loss and the climate emergency.

Siân combines her extensive knowledge of ecological and environmental issues with a passion for education and inclusion, promoting the use of nature and outdoor spaces as a therapeutic environment.

She is a founding member of the South Ayrshire Green Health Partnership, which is exploring the use of social prescribing to connect people with nature and its associated health benefits.

Siân completed her psychology conversion course in 2021, with her research into occupational technostress and the restorativeness of natural spaces leading to publication in 2023.

She continues to be interested in taking a mutli-disciplinary approach to the climate and ecological crises, advocating the use of psychological principles to understand motivations and help drive the behaviour change needed to reduce and adapt to future climate and environmental change.

Member Network Actions

  1. Produce guidance for psychologists working with individuals, groups and organisations to help them to promote awareness and constructive management of the impacts of the crisis on mental health and wellbeing.
  2. Develop guidance and events to support collective actions to engage with the crisis.
  3. Summarise and publicise relevant research and encourage further such research through BPS awards and prizes.
  4. Create guidance or toolkits that can be used by educators for example schools, course leaders etc.
  5. Create opportunities for conversations & collaborations with stakeholders including communities, policy makers and psychologists on sustainable behaviours for individual and collective action e.g., interactive events.
  6. Create, share and disseminate materials -where appropriate in collaboration with other organisations- to improve psychologists’ understanding of the relationship between climate, environment and health/wellbeing.
  7. Work with the BPS to disseminate best practice across communication channels.
  8. Encourage dissemination of climate and environmental research at BPS conferences.
  9. Work alongside BPS staff, member networks, sections and divisions to help create innovative solutions to the sharing of best practice in public engagement.
  10. Ensure psychology has a voice in political debate, action and policy on climate and environment with relevant national government and third sector bodies.
  11. Develop relationships with external professional organisations who influence the policy making agenda on environment and climate change
  12. Develop a BPS community of environmental and climate advocates.
  13. Summarise relevant research and share evidence-based guidance to document the link between climate injustices, human rights and inequalities that marginalised communities face in the UK.
  14. Work with member networks in exploring the intersections between equality, equity and climate change.