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Abstracts

The effectiveness of Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) on improving positive social behaviours in early adolescents (11-14 years old) with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

11 January 2021

Author: Steffanie Ho (University College London)

This thesis examines research in relations to the impact of Video-based interventions (VBI) on the social skills development of school-aged individuals with Special Educational Needs (SEN).

A systematic literature review was carried out to examine the effectiveness of VBI on promoting social skills among school-aged individuals with SEN.

17 papers from the last decade (2009- 2019) were included in the review.

The Weight of Evidence (WoE) framework and the coding protocol for single-case design studies were used to evaluate these studies.

Amongst the four studies with the highest overall WoE, the use of Video Modelling (VM), Portable Video Modelling Intervention (PVMI) and Video Group Instructions (VGI) to were found to be very effective in supporting the social skills development of these targeted individuals. Implications for further practice and research were outlined.

The empirical paper focused on the effectiveness of Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) on improving positive social behaviours in adolescents (11-14 years old) with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

A small-N mixed methods design was adopted. Four adolescents with ADHD were recruited from two mainstream schools in an outer London borough.

Four sets of teachers and parents also participated in the study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were applied to study the research questions. Mixed parallel analysis, including reliable change index, descriptive data and thematic analysis, were adopted.

Results indicated that whilst some adolescent participants made improvements in their conversation engagement and self-control following the VIG intervention, these intervention effects were not observed across all participants.

Generalisation across other settings was not reported.

Parents and teachers highlighted environmental and contextual factors that affect the adolescents’ social skills, such as the adolescents’ relationship with others and exam stress.

Improvement suggestions on the intervention were discussed by the parents, teachers and adolescents. Implications and suggestions for further research were also discussed.

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