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Events

DCP Annual Conference 2022

Thursday 13th October - Friday 14th October 2022

We would welcome submissions for posters and presentation for our annual conference on 13th & 14th October 2022.  This conference will be held virtually. 

The theme of the 2022 DCP Annual conference is:

Facing Threat and Uncertainty Together: Maintaining momentum through global, professional and personal challenge

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After listening to concerns raised by our colleagues about the timing of this event we have postponed this event to 13-14 October 2022. We hope this will enable more of you to be involved and participate in the event.

This conference will focus on themes facing Clinical Psychology in this ever-changing environment and as always welcomes submissions from people at all stages of their careers as well as those with lived experience. 

Global society has undeniably faced a major threat over the past two years. Whilst COVID has remained the predominant theme, the world has also seen shifts in attitudes towards climate change and social justice. Now, we are confronting urgencies to act, unknown in any other period in recent times. 

Many people have been forced to reflect on their health, safety, work and relationships in ways that were unexpected and sudden. As the pandemic enters a new phase, some are moving forward, feeling stronger and empowered by the experiences they have survived.

For others, the pandemic and its consequences are never ending. 

Some will be re-evaluating their priorities and principles, in light of the challenges they have faced. There is a danger that these polarities in experience will lead to further divides in society.

Clinical Psychology has a role to play in helping society understand different perspectives and positions. This is important given the ever-changing world we live in.

Whether we are considering global warming, social divides, stigma faced by the people we support or the ongoing pandemic; we all need to find ways to align our priorities to work together.

Within NHS practice and training, Clinical Psychologists are also experiencing huge change as the implications of the long-term plan and subsequent policies are felt.

The challenge remains for us, as ever, to translate the wider changes in society into what is most meaningful to those we support in our work. This can become harder when it feels that the landscape in which we work is continually shifting.

The question then arises; how do we maintain momentum in the face of threat and uncertainty? 

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