Teaching and Learning

Congratulations to Professor James Hartley, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Keele University and BPS Fellow, who has been given a lifetime achievement award by the Society’s Education and Public Engagement Board.
A child's television viewing habits can have a significant impact on their education and development, according to a new study.
A briefing from the British Psychological Society highlights the future risks to children and young people from educational disengagement. It shows what psychology can offer and makes recommendations for policy makers to improve school attendance.
Learning activities can be initiated by both older and younger siblings, according to a new study.
We're oblivious to a lot of what passes in front of our eyes. The classic example is people's failure to notice a woman walk through a scene in a gorilla suit.
Teachers are being issued with new guidance to help them spot pupils with mental health issues in a bid to prevent such youngsters being labelled as badly behaved.
Recent figures from the Royal College of Psychiatrists show that a growing number of students are seeking help from their university counselling service.
It's well known that psychology research relies too heavily on student volunteers. So many findings are assumed to apply to people in general, when they could be a quirk unique to undergrads.
We are delighted to announce that the British Psychological Society's 2014 Undergraduate Research Assistantship Scheme has resulted in 11 new research projects being funded.
Children who have been bullied may be posing a risk in school environments by taking weapons into the classroom, according to a new study based in the US.
Since the beginning of April, host duties on our Research Dgest blog have been handled by a series of eight excellent psychologists and bloggers.
A new study has indicated that preschool teachers in the US who suffer from depression could be having a profound effect on the future of their students.
An authoritarian culture in which young people are routinely insulted and ridiculed is deeply rooted in top-flight football academies, new
Introducing programmes to help children beat examination anxiety could be an effective way of reducing their stress and angst levels more generally, according to a new study
Anticipation is building ahead of the British Psychological Society's annual conference, which takes place from tomorrow (7 May) until 9 May at the International Convention Centre in Birmingham.
An online resource has been developed by King's College London as part of an effort to improve mental health among university students.
The primary purpose of the event will be to examine transitions in terms of the study and application of Psychology. In particular it will attempt to broaden debate upon the transfer in and out of university study.
Making students aware of what might happen if they fail an exam could adversely affect their academic performance, a new study has found.
The British Psychological Society's Behaviour Change Advisory Group (BCAG) works to provide expert advice on behaviour change in the context of public policy.
Are you a racist? Most likely, your answer is no – and perhaps you find the very notion offensive. But according to two Cardiff University psychologists, many educated people harbour prejudiced attitudes even though they deny it.
When you’ve done something good, or performed a task well, it feels great to get some praise for it. And parents and teachers, especially in Western cultures, are encouraged to dole out praise to children in an increasingly generous manner.
More than 130 psychology students from the University of the Highlands and Islands enjoyed a five-day residential course last week as part of their degree programme.
A new scheme has trained psychology students to become mentors for people with mental health issues, particularly those struggling with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) issues.
The BPS Scottish Branch and Edinburgh Napier University will host an undergraduate conference in Edinburgh on Saturday 22 March. This fully subscribed event will feature research presentations from third and fourth year Scottish university psychology undergraduates and a ‘Psychology Futures’ careers fair.
The government is considering introducing mindfulness sessions into schools.
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