General Psychology

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Fear, fender identity and the midlife crisis are the subjects to be discussed at the 2016 Cheltenham Literature Festival in sessions sponsored by the British Psychological Society.
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This is an open forum event for all members to bring their views and opinions to a discussion about Psychology and what's in it for you.

Chair: Professor Dr Zenobia Nadirshaw

An academic (retired) and Clinical Psychologist with a range of experience within the BPS and the Division of Clinical Psychology. Prof. Nadirshaw has won several National and International Awards - the latest ones being the Honorary Life Membership Award 2016 from the BPS and the Inspirational Woman of the Year 2016.

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This event comprises four talks and a panel discussion and is hosted by BPS Northern Ireland Branch to celebrate World Mental Health Day 2016.

Programme information

6:00pm

Mental Health First Aid

Ms Helen Gibson Public Health Agency

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We are pleased to announce the winners of the British Psychological Society Book Awards.

This year awards have been made in all four categories: Academic Monograph; Popular Science; Practitioner Text; and Textbook.

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This is a joint event organised by BPS NI Branch, DCP NI Branch and Queen's University Belfast School of Psychology in support of World Mental Health Day. This event will be of interest to people working in public health and education settings, people with an interest in issues of social justice, and those interested in current affairs.

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Features in non-fiction children’s books such as lift-the-flap may hinder toddlers from learning new words suggests a study presented this week at the British Psychological Society Developmental Psychology Section's annual conference.

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The 2016 DCP East of England Annual conference will be on the topic of compassion focused therapy (CFT). The conference will begin with Michelle Cree providing an overview of the use of compassion focused therapy in perinatal mental health, for mothers who are suffering from severe mental illness in the late stages of pregnancy and up to one year after having her baby. Ken Goss will present the next section on compassion focused letter writing.

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How do we find our way around and why do we sometimes get lost? Tom Hartley will be discussing his research on spatial cognition and how the brain supports behaviour and memory in complex environments. For example how do we find our way around the city centre, or recognise a countryside location we've visited before? These behaviours depend on specialised brain systems. This has potential applications to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

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In this talk, current BPS President Professor Peter Kinderman will introduce a radical new approach to mental health and wellbeing. It will challenge some of our current assumptions about mental health and mental illness, and recommend transformational evolution in how we could deliver care better, more humanely and more scientifically.

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Documentaries about science often go heavy on awe. In his immensely popular TV shows, the pop star turned physicist Brian Cox is frequently depicted in awesome landscapes, staring into the distance, moody music in the background, reflecting on awe-inspiring facts about nature, such as that we are all essentially made of star dust. It seems like a powerful way to engage people in science.

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Cigarette smoking and mental health problems are highly comorbid, but it remains unclear whether these mental health problems lead to smoking, or smoking leads to mental health problems. It could be either, or both, or the relationship could be due to some third factor (e.g., socioeconomic factors). This talk will describe new methods that take advantage of recent insights into the genetic influences on both smoking and mental health that allow us to better understand whether this relationship is simply correlation, or reflects a causal influence.

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Dr Lisa Cameron, a current Member of Parliament and Chartered Psychologist is one of the speakers at the British Psychological Society’s annual psychology4graduates event taking place in London on Wednesday 30 November.

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Disgust has become a hot topic in psychology research over the last decade or so, not least because findings have shown that the way we respond to physically disgusting threats, like disease-infested blood and pus, is closely related to the way we think about moral violations and moral concepts like purity.

One repeated claim in this area is that we have evolved to be disgusted by any reminder that we are animals.

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You may have heard of face-blindness (known formally as prosopagnosia), which is when someone has a particular difficulty recognising familiar faces.

The condition was first noticed in brain-damaged soldiers and for a long time psychologists thought it was extremely rare and primarily caused by brain damage. But in recent years they’ve discovered that it’s actually a relatively common condition that some (approximately two per cent of the population) otherwise healthy people are born with.

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Leadership skills are a core part of your repertoire as a psychologist and you will be encouraged to exercise them at every stage of your career from Assistant Psychologist to Consultant Psychologist. You have gained the knowledge and training to think psychologically, to formulate, plan and structure your work with clients on an individual and at a group level.  There are skills that are transferable to any leadership setting. This 2 day course will provide you with the confidence and competencies to lead as a psychologist in any work setting whatever your level of experience.

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Presented by BPS North West Branch, DCP North West Branch and the DCP Faculty of the Psychology of Older People, this exciting collaborative event will include four presentations by experienced clinicians and researchers with a wealth of knowledge in working across the lifespan (Peter Fisher, Katherine Berry, Andrea Flood, Jon Coldwell and David Glasgow).

Topics will include formulation in forensic and clinical settings, including systemic, attachment, and meta-cognitive based approaches.

The DCP North West AGM will also be held during the day.

 

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Whether in sport, military, business or medical environments, performing at one’s best provides a multitude of opportunities for gaining personal glory. Narcissistic individuals crave admiration and glory, and thus the performance domain constitutes an ideal medium to explore narcissistic behaviour. This talk examines the relation between narcissism and performance and demonstrates that narcissists’ performance is contingent upon perceived opportunities for self-enhancement along with some potential explanatory mechanism for this effect.

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William James proposed that bodily sensations – a thumping heart, a sweaty palm – aren’t merely a consequence of our emotions, but may actually cause them. In his famous example, when you see a bear and your pulse races and you start running, it’s the running and the racing pulse that makes you feel afraid.

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When strangers meet, they jump to a lot of conclusions about each other extremely quickly – a process that psychologists call “thin slicing” in reference to the thinness of the evidence upon which such sweeping inferences are made.

For instance, being a woman means you’re more likely to be perceived as warm, but less likely to be seen as dominant. If you’re Asian in ethnicity, chances are people will assume you’re less warm but more competent than average.

Facial expressions also make an impact – for example, when we smile, we’re seen as more extravert.

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This is a deeply uncomfortable, powerful, and gripping film. It has deservedly won several awards, including Best International Feature Film at the Edinburgh Film Festival and two awards at the Sundance Film Festival. It contains two important messages: first, that power is dangerous; and second, that environments and ‘systems’ matter in the production of abuse.

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Stanley Milgram’s experiments on obedience to authority are amongst the most famous and controversial studies in the history of psychology.  For over fifty years we thought we knew what Milgram’s studies told us – that seemingly ordinary members of the public would administer potentially lethal electric shocks to an innocent victim in response to commands from an authority figure.  The studies have thus been used to show just how easily people can be led into following orders.  However, recent work has pointed to the dramatic conclusion that, in fact, Milgram’s studies show p

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We usually think of boredom as a state to be avoided. The existentialist philosopher Søren Kierkegaard even went so far as to say that “boredom is the root of all evil”.

But a new paper discussed on our Research Digest blog suggests there is under-recognised value in this much maligned emotional state.

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Immediately after we’ve been shunned, a new study shows, our brains engage a subtle mechanism that alters our sense of whether other people are making eye contact with us, so that we think it more likely that they are looking our way.

As friendly encounters often begin with a moment of joint eye contact, the researchers think this “widening of the cone of gaze” as they call it could help the ostracised to spot opportunities for forging new relationships.

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According to Hollywood stereotypes, there are the clever, nerdy young people who spend most of their time sitting around thinking and reading, and then there are the jocks – the sporty, athletic lot who prefer to do as little thinking and studying as possible.

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Psychology research has shown that men and women usually remember things differentely. For instance women on average are better at recalling emotional and social stimuli, whereas men are better at remembering episodes of voilence and recognising artifical objects such as cars.

A study in Applied Cognitive Psychology has added to this literature by testing whether men and women differ in how much they remember of clips from rom-com movies and action films.

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