General Psychology

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Eyes shut tight, face contorted into a grimace. Are they ecstatic or anguished? Ignorant of the context, it can be hard to tell.

Recent research that involved participants looking at images of the facial expressions of professional tennis players supported this intuition – participants naive to the context were unable to tell the difference between the winners and losers.

Read more on our Research Digest blog.

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If you were sat in a dark room and the lights flickered off every few seconds, you'd definitely notice. Yet when your blinks make the world go momentarily dark – and bear in mind most of us perform around 12 to 15 of these every minute – you are mostly oblivious. It certainly doesn't feel like someone is flicking the lights on and off. How can this be?

A new study has tested two possibilities - read more on our Research Digest blog.

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The 1994 Wonderbra billboard campaign with its distinctive “Hello Boys!” catchphrase regularly gets a mention as one of most iconic advert series of all time. Its portrayal of super model Eva Herzigova clad only in black lacey pants and gravity-defying bra is said to have sent drivers veering off the roads.

However a new study discussed on a Research Digest blog suggests that attention grabbing billboard ads may actually have the opposite effect on driving performance.

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It's a dilemma extremely familiar to anyone with social anxiety – for how long to make eye contact before looking away? The fear is that if you only ever fix the other person's gaze for very brief spells then you'll look shifty. If you lock on for too long, on the other hand, then there's the risk of seeming creepy.

Thankfully a team of British researchers has now conducted the most comprehensive study of what people generally regard as a comfortable length of eye contact.

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The most popular and widely researched explanation is that people experience a diffusion of responsibility when in the company of other bystanders. We don't help the person who is being assaulted in a busy street because we assume that someone else will.

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You know that situation where you're walking across a station concourse or a park and there's another person walking on a different trajectory that means if you both hold your course and speed, you're going to collide?

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The fascinating history of a British artist and spiritualist medium Georgina Houghton will be examined in a free British Pyschological Society supported seminar from 6pm to 7:30pm, Tuesday 14 June at University College London.

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A huge audience of psychologists, students and researchers was drawn to the British Psychological Society debate in London about the reproducibility and replication crisis in psychology.

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Jack is on trial for murder and you could be on the jury. The twist? Jack is a chimpanzee.

The trial takes place tonight (Thursday 9 June) at the Cheltenham Science Festival this evening in a session sponsored by the British Psychological Society. Tickets are still available – book via the festival website.

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The popular annual Cheltenham Science Festival is hosting a sold-out British Psychological Society supported event this evening on the topic ‘The Myth of Masculinity’.

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Your brain has a representation of where your body extends in space. It's how you know whether you can fit through a doorway or not, among other things. This representation – the "body schema" as some scientists call it – is flexible.

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Recreational runners are more likely to listen to running shoe recommendations from potentially untrustworthy blogs and fitness store employees than qualified medical experts says a study published in the British Journal of Health Psychology.

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Pick up any introductory psychology textbook and under the "developmental" chapter you're bound to find a description of "groundbreaking" research into newborn babies' imitation skills.

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The first set of discipline specific guidance documents for expert witnesses in England and Wales developed jointly by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and The Family Justice Council (FJC) are available online.

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Flying a plane is no trivial task, but adverse weather conditions are where things get seriously challenging.

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Life is full of paradoxes and uncertainty – good people who do bad things, and questions with no right or wrong answer. But the human mind abhors doubt and contradictions, which provoke an uncomfortable state of "cognitive dissonance".

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A belief in the paranormal can mean individuals experience more déjà vu moments in their lives.

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Researchers in the USA have used a smartphone app to see how people's sleep habits vary around the world.

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In the lead article of The Psychologist – the official magazine of the British Psychological Society – two of the world’s leading experts on the psychology of leadership explain how Ranieri contributed to Leicester’s historical Premiership success.

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Listening to traffic reports on the radio could be bad for your driving – you could even miss an elephant standing by the side of the road..

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The British Psychological Society 2016 Annual Conference takes place in Nottingham over the next three days (26 - 28 April). 

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How systematically practicing recovering memories can help alleviate symptoms of depression is one of the topics featured in a new series of BPS audio interviews with prominent psychologists.

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The BPS Research Board has grants of up to £3000 to support any of our Member Networks to convene a symposium at an international conference.

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In light of today's report by the BBC showing that some people with psychological problems are having to wait years for therapy, The British Psychological Society calls on the next Welsh Government to make improving access to mental health services their immediate priority.

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