Cyberpsychology

People who post messages about their emotional state on social media such as Facebook could be unwittingly affecting the mood of their friends, according to a new
The challenges faced by teachers trying to cope with the consequences of cyberbullying in the classroom will be discussed today in a free public session as part of the British Psychological Society’s Northern Ireland branch annual conference.
Online gamers may be enjoying an expansion of their social lives, rather than suffering ill-effects because of its contraction, according to new research.
Children who spend too much time in front of TV screens and electronic devices could be at risk of damaging their wellbeing, according to a new study.
Women who regularly use Facebook may be at risk of becoming dissatisfied with their bodies and even developing eating disorders, according to new research.
Interacting with people on Facebook could result in greater levels of anxiety when eventually meeting those individuals face-to-face, particularly among those who are already socially anxious.
A groundbreaking new project between Bristol University and the Samaritans is to assess the role of the internet in affecting people with suicidal thoughts.
Teenagers could be putting themselves at risk of a range of psychological issues because they are spending too much time on electronic devices and not enough time sleeping, according to a new
Special Group For Independent Practitioners Supporting the needs of independent practitioners to combine competently and ethically their psychological practice with the necessity to develop and maintain a business.
People who play computer games together appear to mimic each other's emotional behaviour, according to a new study.
A growing number of young people are contacting ChildLine after experiencing bullying via the internet. The charity dealt with 2,410 cases of online bullying during 2011-12, but this went up to 4,507 during 2012-13.
Many people would see looking at cat memes on the internet as a waste of time, but an app developer believes they could be the perfect way to help people learn new languages.
Getting involved with a charity or good cause on social media may make people less likely to actually donate money or other resources to it, according to
After Aaron Alexis shot dead 12 people at the Navy Yard in Washington DC in September, media outlets were quick to highlight his reported enjoyment of violent video games.
New BPS guidelines aim to help with the questions, sometimes non-obvious, and challenges in adhering to existing ethics principles in relation to internet-mediated research (IMR).
In the competition for readers' mouse clicks, a favoured trick is to phrase headlines as questions. This isn't an Internet innovation. As a way to grab attention, question headlines have been recommended by editors and marketeers for decades.
Personality trait clues can be gathered by looking at an individual's Facebook use, new research has suggested.
Organisations know that job candidates are presenting an idealised version of themselves in their CV and at interview. According to reports, many recruiters are therefore taking to social media to find an uncensored version of their applicants.
Some internet clips like President Obama's 'Yes We Can' campaign video go viral. Audiences reach into the millions thanks to so many people choosing to forward the link to friends.
A rise in self-harm instances among young people in the UK has been blamed on the increasing pressures these individuals are under.
Taking longer to reply to a text message may be an indication that the person is being untruthful with what they are writing.
Psychology can play an important part in shaping the development of video games. This is according to Cyberpsychologist Berni Good, a member of the British Psychological Society, who is to speak on the matter at the upcoming F2P Summit.
A new study reported by our Research Digest blog looks at the effect on reader reaction of initial positive and negative reactions on the web.
Young adults who use the social networking site Facebook may feel worse about themselves as a result of doing so.
People are heavily influenced by the positive opinions they read on the internet, but much less so by the negative ones seen on the same website.
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