Sports and exercise

Practising at a particular discipline or activity often helps to improve competence, a new study has concluded.
Sports coaches are highly likely to overreact in the event of a loss, a new study has concluded.
With the Commonwealth Games under way in Glasgow, psychologists can help explain just what it is that the public finds enticing about big sporting events.
The final stages of big football tournaments are often dominated by penalty shootouts. And research presented at our Annual Conference a few years ago may just have given the key to success in them.
Just before the triumph that was the Grand Depart in Yorkshire, our monthly magazine The Psychologist investigated how psychology touches the participants, spectators and volunteers in the Tour de France:
We know self-talk can help people's self-control (e.g. "Don't do it!"), and boost their morale (e.g. "Hang in there!") in sporting situations.
As Yorkshire awaits the start of the Tour de France, a psychologist is to give a public talk on the psychology behind the event in York on Tuesday 1 July.
The reputation of a coach can be pivotal when it comes to getting the best out of footballers. This is conclusion of research by a team led by Dr Andrew Manley from Leeds Metropolitan University. Their findings are published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports.
With the World Cup in full swing, many youngsters will no doubt be wondering how they too can one day join their country's team and play for glory - and it turns out that mental toughness could be key to making their dreams come true.
Matthew Slater and Marc Jones, sport and exercise psychologists at Staffordshire University, look at the psychology of blending individuals from different clubs into a national team.
Superstitions can help footballers control their anxiety before a game. That was the conclusion of research presented at the British Psychology Society Annual Conference in 2012.
Chartered Psychologist Dr Jamie Barker from Staffordshire University will be speaking on the psychology of cricket at the Cheltenham Science Festival next week. He will be taking part in a session that also features the journalist and former England batsman Ed Smith.
Opening introduction by Dr Richard Mallows, Society President (2013–14)Every July, the world’s best road cyclists take part in Le Tour de France – the pinnacle of the road cycling cal
Ten- to 14-year-olds are less likely to take up smoking if they regularly participate in coached team sports, a new study has revealed.
An authoritarian culture in which young people are routinely insulted and ridiculed is deeply rooted in top-flight football academies, new
Carrying out regular aerobic exercise could help to prevent memory loss for women in later life, a study has suggeste
Sportsmen and women may respond better to female psychologists than they do to male practitioners, new research has suggested. Leeds Metropolitan University's Rebecca Mitchell carried out a study that is set to be presented at the
Being warm makes people more cooperative, according to research carried out by the University of South Wales.
Sending injured armed forces personnel to participate in residential sports courses could aid and speed up their recovery, according to research to be presented at the British Psychological Society's annual c
Anxiety about a competitive situation makes even the most physically active more likely to slip-up suggests a study presented today at the British Psychological Society annual conference in Birmingham.
Research presented at the 2012 Annual Conference of our Division of Occupational Psychology (DOP) has been quoted in a new cross-party report.
The fourth broadcast in the Psychology FM series, which looks at health psychology and sport and exercise psychology, will go out at 11am on Wednesday 19 March.
England does not have a great track record when it comes to penalty shootouts and the team's manager Roy Hodgson has suggested that an expert in psychology may be the answer to reversing the trend.
In a bruising encounter with an aggressor, signalling "I give up!" via your submissive body language can be a life saver. At least that's the case for our primate cousins, and likely too for our human ancestors.
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