Social Psychology

Nostalgia seems like a distraction in a world that’s moving forward. But new research proposes a powerful function of the emotion: as a glue to bind members of social groups.
Create and utilise mixed methods research designs in applied psychology. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
An introduction to positive psychology.
Widening the perspective about aggression in adolescents with ASD. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends Details Aggression
Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends Details Pluralism in qualitative research combines methods, analyses or interpretations to se
This workshop will offer researchers who are more used to working within quantitative paradigms some ways, advantages and challenges of combining quantitative methods with qualitative methods to conduct mixed methods research.  Timeta
A person's enjoyment of a movie can be heavily influenced by their surroundings, according to a new
Sympathy towards the suffering is culture-dependent. People from "simpatico" cultures such as Brazil or Costa Rica are more likely to help people in need, as are people from economically poorer nations compared to wealthier counterparts.
It’s the time of year, at least in our part of the world, when darkness encroaches on us—literally and metaphorically.
In Milgram's shock experiments, a surprising number of people obeyed a scientist's instruction to deliver dangerous electric shocks. This is usually interpreted in terms of the power of "strong situations".
A "collective hysteria" affected many courts following the 2011 riots in England, a new study has concluded.
The built environment shapes our behaviour profoundly - piazzas and park benches promote unplanned encounters between strangers whereas car-friendly streets have the opposite effect, the efficiency of speedy travel promoting "streets as corridors"
A person who shares recollections of extraordinary experiences could harm their social relationships, a new study has suggested.
Men can become more responsive to rewarding social behaviours such as smiling after consuming alcohol, a new study has found.
Conspiracy theories flourish even when there is no official explanation to react against, finds a psychologist who has examined reactions to the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 – the passenger jet that disappeared without a trace i
Just over half a century ago, Stanley Milgram ran the most renowned studies in the history of psychology. He showed how ordinary people can do extraordinary harm to others when asked to do so. His conclusion, made famous through his film of the research, Obedience, was that humans are programmed to obey orders, no matter how noxious.
A person's political persuasion could be down to "deep-seated psychology", rather than the way they were brought up or individual decisions, a new 
A society's view of the status of older people can be a key influencer behind how over-70s feel about their own health, according a new study.
Confirmed Keynote Speakers Click on their name for further information about each Keynote.
People who wear smart glasses could inadvertently violate the privacy of those around them, new research has indicated.
People are more likely to establish successful relationships if they can modify their behaviour when necessary, a new study has concluded.
Moving in time with other people makes us more likely to feel connected to them and helpful towards them - even when we are unable to walk and talk, according to a new s
Friendships between heterosexual men and women can be tricky to navigate, especially when it comes to tactile contact. Is that touch on the arm a gesture of platonic care and affection? Or an unwanted signal of sexual interest?
The responses of people to disaster relief appeals are conditioned by how photogenic the children pictured look - but not in the way some might assume.
"Cool kids", according to a new study, are those early teens (aged 13 to 15) who want to be popular, and try to impress their peers by acting older than their years.
Syndicate content