Social Psychology

People who wear smart glasses could inadvertently violate the privacy of those around them, new research has indicated.
People are more likely to establish successful relationships if they can modify their behaviour when necessary, a new study has concluded.
Moving in time with other people makes us more likely to feel connected to them and helpful towards them - even when we are unable to walk and talk, according to a new s
Friendships between heterosexual men and women can be tricky to navigate, especially when it comes to tactile contact. Is that touch on the arm a gesture of platonic care and affection? Or an unwanted signal of sexual interest?
The responses of people to disaster relief appeals are conditioned by how photogenic the children pictured look - but not in the way some might assume.
"Cool kids", according to a new study, are those early teens (aged 13 to 15) who want to be popular, and try to impress their peers by acting older than their years.
People's cognitive biases can lead to the content of a narrative altering over time, a study has found.
In a guest post on our Research Digest blog, Dan Jones looks at new research into encouraging cooperation with people we shall never meet.
Experts say that spending more time standing at work is good for your physical well-being. Now there's another reason to ditch your office chair. According to psychologists in the US, standing improves group brainstorming sessions.
The proportion of people in Britain who would call themselves racially prejudiced has risen since the start of the 21st century to hit levels previously seen 30 years ago, according to a new
Maintaining social ties and joining in group activities could help older people to stay healthier for longer, according to new research set to be published next month.
Psychology is coming to terms with the idea that replication is a vital ingredient in the recipe of discovery.
Males are more likely to commit spiteful deeds than females, new research has concluded.
New research has suggested that the state of the economy at the time of a person's birth could influence how narcissistic they turn out to be.
Students could be encouraged to drink alcohol at safer levels if a more positive image existed of those who opt to abstain completely, according to new research being presented at the
A study into how people perceive masculinity has revealed prejudices exist in society today.  
Implicit attitudes are one of the hottest topics in social psychology. Now a massive new study directly compares methods for changing them.
Living in a household that contains a child's grandparents as well as its parents could raise the risk of the mother experiencing depression within a year after giving birth, according to a new study.
University of Glasgow (UoG) chair of health psychology Professor Rory O'Connor has been awarded status of Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences (AcSS).
Millions of people around the world may be deliberately avoiding feeling too happy with their lives because they fear it may tempt fate to bring them some bad luck, a study h
Interacting with people on Facebook could result in greater levels of anxiety when eventually meeting those individuals face-to-face, particularly among those who are already socially anxious.
Having a dual ethno-national identification could influence how people feel about taking political action on behalf of minority religious groups, according to a study published in the British Psychological Society's British Journal of Social Psych
Many studies have shown that people tend to exaggerate their own positive characteristics and abilities. A popular example is the finding that most drivers think they are a better-than-average driver. 
The results of a new study have provided some fascinating insights into paranoia and how helping people to feel more confident could assist them in overcoming it.
An analysis of girls' performances in 12 US school chess tournaments has found they tend to underperform when playing against boys.
Syndicate content