Social Psychology

When you smile at a party, your facial expression is emotionally consistent with the happy context and as a consequence other guests will in future be more likely to remember that they've seen your face before, and where you were when they saw you
For many shy people, online social networking sites have an obvious appeal – a way to socialise without the unpredictable immediacy of a face-to-face encounter.
A single supportive close friendship can help young people from low-income backgrounds to thrive in challenging circumstances, according to a new study in the British Journal of Psychology..
Mimicry is a useful habit: for instance, we prefer conversation partners whose speech rates mimic our own to those whose speech is jarringly different.
We spend most of our lives trying to be as happy as possible, but a team of researchers in Israel has explored how we sometimes appear to find, if not pleasure exactly, at least a certain satisfaction in sharing moments of sadness with others.
The saying "birds of a feather flock together" might apply to non-human primates, as well.
In our part of the world, more people are living on their own than ever before. People also say they have fewer close friends.
The editors of our British Journal of Social Psychology (BJSP) have compiled a free virtual issue to coinci
The true story of Christopher McCandless, dramatised in the 2007 film Into the Wild, is a search for radical independence that culminates in McCandless’ solitary existence in the wilds of Alaska.
"The Culture of Poverty”, published in 1966, was hugely influential, persuading many policy makers that children from low-income families are destined for lives of “criminality, joblessness, and poverty” because they exist in enclaves characterise
Identifying with a specific group of online gamers, such those who play Football Manager, can help gamers’ overall feelings of psychological wellbeing. This finding by Dr Linda Kaye from Edge Hill University was presented today at the Annual Conference of the British Psychology Society in Liverpool earlier this week.
Our view of what makes us happy has changed markedly since 1938. That is the conclusion of the psychologist Sandie McHugh from the Univeristy of Bolton who has recreated a famous study of happiness conducted in Bolton in 1938.
Loneliness is bad for you. Some experts have even likened it to a kind of disease. What's unclear is how being being lonely leads to these adverse effects on our health.
Psychology has long known that merely holding warm objects can increase individuals’ interpersonal warmth, inducing behaviour such as giving more positive judgment about others and being more likely to choose gifts for friends rather than for themselves.
It’s been a year of ups and downs in social psychology.
Like Zimbardo's prison study and Milgram's so-called "obedience experiments", the research that Solomon Asch conducted at Swarthmore College in the 1950s has acquired an almost mythical quality,
We are beginning to understand that single individuals can have a disproportionate impact on group performance.
A Society supported podcast titled ‘Broken windows’ discussing the positive and negative influence that surroundings can have on people’s behaviour is now available
From sworn witness accounts of alien visitations, to deep-rooted trust in quack medical treatments, the human trait that psychologists call "naive realism" has a lot to answer for.
A Society supported podcast discussing the dynamics of power is now available online.
Individuals from socially disadvantaged groups who define themselves as a part of that group are better prepared to deal with barriers encountered in their life suggests a paper published in the British Journal of Social Psychology.
Science suggests a funnier workplace should be a more effective one, encouraging positive mood and a playful, open approach. But much of the evidence to date rests on theoretical argument or lab experiments.
Receiving help can sting. Admitting that others can do what you can’t and feeling indebted to them can lead to a sense of dependence and incompetence, and even resentment towards the very person who helped you.
You watch with envy as your long-time colleague gets yet another performance bonus - something you've strived for but never obtained. Not long after, you see him trip over in the office in front of everyone.
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