Social Psychology

A "collective hysteria" affected many courts following the 2011 riots in England, a new study has concluded.
The built environment shapes our behaviour profoundly - piazzas and park benches promote unplanned encounters between strangers whereas car-friendly streets have the opposite effect, the efficiency of speedy travel promoting "streets as corridors"
A person who shares recollections of extraordinary experiences could harm their social relationships, a new study has suggested.
Men can become more responsive to rewarding social behaviours such as smiling after consuming alcohol, a new study has found.
Conspiracy theories flourish even when there is no official explanation to react against, finds a psychologist who has examined reactions to the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 – the passenger jet that disappeared without a trace i
Just over half a century ago, Stanley Milgram ran the most renowned studies in the history of psychology. He showed how ordinary people can do extraordinary harm to others when asked to do so. His conclusion, made famous through his film of the research, Obedience, was that humans are programmed to obey orders, no matter how noxious.
A person's political persuasion could be down to "deep-seated psychology", rather than the way they were brought up or individual decisions, a new 
A society's view of the status of older people can be a key influencer behind how over-70s feel about their own health, according a new study.
People who wear smart glasses could inadvertently violate the privacy of those around them, new research has indicated.
People are more likely to establish successful relationships if they can modify their behaviour when necessary, a new study has concluded.
Moving in time with other people makes us more likely to feel connected to them and helpful towards them - even when we are unable to walk and talk, according to a new s
Friendships between heterosexual men and women can be tricky to navigate, especially when it comes to tactile contact. Is that touch on the arm a gesture of platonic care and affection? Or an unwanted signal of sexual interest?
The responses of people to disaster relief appeals are conditioned by how photogenic the children pictured look - but not in the way some might assume.
"Cool kids", according to a new study, are those early teens (aged 13 to 15) who want to be popular, and try to impress their peers by acting older than their years.
People's cognitive biases can lead to the content of a narrative altering over time, a study has found.
In a guest post on our Research Digest blog, Dan Jones looks at new research into encouraging cooperation with people we shall never meet.
Experts say that spending more time standing at work is good for your physical well-being. Now there's another reason to ditch your office chair. According to psychologists in the US, standing improves group brainstorming sessions.
The proportion of people in Britain who would call themselves racially prejudiced has risen since the start of the 21st century to hit levels previously seen 30 years ago, according to a new
Maintaining social ties and joining in group activities could help older people to stay healthier for longer, according to new research set to be published next month.
Psychology is coming to terms with the idea that replication is a vital ingredient in the recipe of discovery.
Males are more likely to commit spiteful deeds than females, new research has concluded.
New research has suggested that the state of the economy at the time of a person's birth could influence how narcissistic they turn out to be.
Students could be encouraged to drink alcohol at safer levels if a more positive image existed of those who opt to abstain completely, according to new research being presented at the
A study into how people perceive masculinity has revealed prejudices exist in society today.  
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