Occupational

A study into how the brain reacts when making decisions has led to researchers pinpointing the specific parts of the organ that interact in order to compute both our confidence in our decisions and the value of options we have in front of us.
People are more prone to making mistakes when their attention is caught by even the shortest of interruptions.
Social workers who wear their hearts on their sleeves risk burnout, but those who fail to engage emotionally with their clients risk alienating them.
Research published today suggests that managers recognise the need to feign their emotions at work, especially when interacting with staff.
Most of us think of being bored at work as a negative experience, but a new study suggests it can have positive results including an increase in creativity because it gives us time to daydream.
Prestige and dominance may indicate future leaders, new research has suggested.
People are more likely to tell lies while at work than during their leisure time.
This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award from our Division of Occupational Psychology (DOP) was presented to Dr Pat Lindley at a ceremony held in London last month.
Entrepreneurs may be more stressed than other workers, but they also harbour more optimism.
Bosses are often more interested in taking on staff they are likely to befriend than those with the skills to do the best job, new research has found.
Poor working conditions can negatively impact a person's mental health to the same degree as unemployment, new research has found.
Companies may benefit from a financial perspective by taking the personalities of employees into consideration when planning strategies.
'Going with your gut' is a well-worn phrase, but many people are dissuaded from taking such an approach by looking before they leap.
Females are keen to improve their lot at work and are not afraid to ask for a pay rise, a new study has shown.
Psychologists talk about different attachment styles, such as secure, anxious and avoidant. The secure style is usually the one we're supposed to aspire to. They're the calm people who find it easy to get close to others, but not in a clingy way.
Sadness can cost people from a financial perspective, new research has shown.
People who were born late in the school year - 'summer babies' - may find it harder to get ahead in the workplace compared to those born at other times of the year.
The saying 'you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar' may have a greater bearing on managers in future, after a study found scientific evidence as to why people perform better after being given a compliment.
Poor mental health in the workplace costs UK employers an estimated £26bn, according to a new briefing published by the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST).
How satisfied an employee is with his or her level of pay often has an influence on work-family conflicts, according to new research to be published in the Jour
The majority of vendettas come from within a group, new research has suggested.
Organisations are networks of conversations. Conversations are not only a tool for communicating change, they are the very medium through which change occurs. Changing the way people talk and listen to each other changes the way people act.
This workshop is cancelled. The workshop draws together extensive research and practical experience to provide participants with a simple, systematic process (CLEAR IDEA©) for creatively generating and implementing solutio
This lunchtime seminar will explore the variety of ways in which Occupational Psychologists contribute to the area of health, work and well-being.
The workshop draws together extensive research and practical experience to provide participants with a simple, systematic process (CLEAR IDEA©) for creatively generating and implementing solutions to challenges at work.
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