Neuropsychology

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How do we find our way around and why do we sometimes get lost? Tom Hartley will be discussing his research on spatial cognition and how the brain supports behaviour and memory in complex environments. For example how do we find our way around the city centre, or recognise a countryside location we've visited before? These behaviours depend on specialised brain systems. This has potential applications to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

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Can we form memories when we are very young? Humans and non-humans alike show an “infantile amnesic period” – we have no memory of anything that happens during this time (usually up to age three or four in humans) which might suggest we can’t form very early memories.

But of course it might be that we can form memories in these early years, it’s just that they are later forgotten. 

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With a new method, 'polygenic scoring', behaviour geneticists can now look to see whether people have specific genetic variants or not, and based on this, make some impressively accurate predictions about how they will behave in the future.

Read more about it in a guest post on our Research Digest blog by Stuart Ritchie.

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New research suggests that witnessing extreme pain – such as the injury or death of a comrade on the battlefield – has a lasting effect on how the brain processes potentially painful situations.

Read more on our award-winning Research Digest blog.

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Discover the answer in a guest post on our Research Digest blog by Daniel Bor.

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In the 1950s, the American psychologist Harry Harlow famously showed that rhesus monkeys would rather cling to a surrogate wire mother covered in cosy cloth, than to one that provided milk. A loving touch is more important even than food, the findings seemed to show.

Around the same time, the British psychoanalyst John Bowlby documented how human children deprived of motherly contact often go on to develop psychological problems.

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An audience of over 300 academics, students and members of the public made their way into Jeffrey Hall at the University College London’s Institute of Education to be a part of 'Mind The Brain'.

This conference celebrated 20 years of groundbreaking research at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and also brought the future of cognitive neuroscience to the public with 15-minute engaging and accessible talks by 12 speakers and four panelists.

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The key things that 21st century parents need to know about babies’ brain development will be the subject of a free public lecture in Belfast on 13 September by Dr Suzanne Zeedyk.

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If you spend time playing mentally taxing games on your smartphone or computer, will it make you more intelligent? A billion dollar "brain training" industry is premised on the idea that it will.

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Timetable

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A British Journal of Neuropsychology paper on mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children received extensive media coverage in April.

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Two British Psychological Society members feature in a new Louis Theroux documentary for BBC Two on Sunday about brain injury, which will show how people and their families come to terms with this life-changing condition.

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Public and industry attention has been forced to focus on the psychological wellbeing of pilots and a lack of clinical psychological skill in aviation.

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The 5th BPS DoN Annual Conference will be held on Thursday 17th and Friday 18th November 2016 at the Royal College of Surgeons.

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As incoming Chair, it’s my pleasure to reflect on the progress of the DoN in the last year under Dr Peter Rankin’s leadership.

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We often want to know what’s driving other people’s actions. Does the politician who visited a refugee camp on the eve of elections truly care for the poverty-stricken?

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Event information

There is a long history of debate about biological sex differences and their part in determining gender roles, with the ‘biology is destiny’ mantra being used to legitimise imbalances in these roles.

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Dr Jill Winegardner is to receive the Practitioner of the Year Award from the British Psychological Society’s Professional Practice Board.

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Professor Robin Morris is to receive this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award from the British Psychological Society’s Professional Practice Board.

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This workshop will challenge the concept of organic personality change through the presentation of research data and new clinical perspectives on intervention

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Learn about current research, best practise and innovations to support children with brain injury

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2 day training on cognitive assessment in non-specialist neuropsychology settings for applied psychologists working with children

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Further your knowledge and skills in trauma practice with cutting edge developments and insights from neuroscience research.

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Affecting around 1 per cent of the world's population, Tourette syndrome is described by the NHS as a neurological condition 'characterised by a combination of involuntary noises and movements called tics'.

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09:00 Registration & coffee/tea
09:30CPD event: Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) with Neurological Conditions - David Gillanders etc.