Neuropsychology

For many years, the hormone oxytocin was caricatured as the source of all human goodness - trust, altruism, love, and morality.
Clinicians and neuroscientists must work together to understand and improve psychological treatments says an article in Nature magazine.
The Added Value of Clinical NeuropsychologyWe are delighted to welcome internationally recognised experts in neuropsychology to our third BPS Division of Neuropsychology (DoN) Annual Conference.
The 54-year-old epilepsy patient - her name remains concealed to protect her privacy - was lying on the operating table while surgeons explored inside her brain with electrodes. They were looking for the source of her epileptic seizures.
A new study has linked exposure to violence on television with less mature brain development and poorer executive functioning in young men.
The Division of Neuropsychology Scotland is hosting a research/CPD event on the Thursday 2 October 2014 with key topics being neurological disorders.  As part of this event we are also holding a poster presentation on research or audit w
Children and adults who learn musical instruments could enjoy improved cognitive function, a new study has suggested.
Some memories we aim to remember, others just show up. One proposal is that uninvited memories, such as those that intrude in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), are encoded and stored in a distinct memory system.
Depression is a growing public health concern, affecting 1 in 9 people at some point in their lives, and with a third of sufferers experiencing little or no benefit from medication. Faced with this crisis, scientists have looked for alternati
The Fourth UK Paediatric Neuropsychology Symposium, ‘Atypical Developmental Pathways’, will take place at the Institute for Child Health in London this week (19-23 May).
A study into brain patterns suggests musical training can alter the way we think.
"When children display problems in one area, it might be more important to, as early as possible, set up a strategy for helping with all related symptoms rather than trying to help only with a specific diagnosis (which often will change over time)
Professor Trevor Robbins CBE from the University of Cambridge is to receive his Brain Prize at a ceremony in Copenhagen today, Thursday 1 May. The prize recognises highly original and influential advances in any area of neuroscience.
The British Psychological Society is holding a reception at the Scottish Parliament this evening (29 April 2014) to raise awareness of the increased risk of reoffending behaviour following injury to the head and brain.
Our use of laughter and swearing as forms of emotional expression are two of the topics featured in a new BPS series of audio interviews with prominent psychologists.
New research suggests that children with Tourette's syndrome (TS) could be unconsciously training their brain to minimise the tics they display.
People may be more likely to experience gambling addiction if they have damage to a particular part of the brain, or it is not functioning properly.
The winners of this year's annual Brain Prize have been announced at a ceremony in Denmark. Giacomo Rizzolatti, Stanislas Dehaene and Trevor W.
The cognitive damage caused by white matter disease appears to be more widespread than previously thought, according to a study published in the British Psychological Society's Journal of Neuropsychology today. 
The second fortnightly Psychology FM broadcast goes out on the Manchester radio station ALL FM on Wednesday 19 February at 11am and will look at neuropsychology.
The role cognitive and behavioural psychologists play in the race to crack the world’s most complex system, the human mind, will be explored in a fully booked Science Museum event today, Wednesday 12 March, at the Dana Centre in London.
You wouldn't believe the amount of ink spilled by neuroscientists and psychologists attempting to explain the simple fact that we can't tickle ourselves.
Two new studies have resulted in discoveries about the causes of schizophrenia, which is believed to affect around one in 100 people at some time in their lives.
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