Forensic

This workshop will equip participants with greater knowledge how to help people who hear voices and learn from the dialogue they are engaged in.
Event information The University of Portsmouth and Division of Forensic Psychology, BPS present a one day seminar.
An integrated approach to working with a difficult and challenging complex client group
A psychology PhD student with a passion for influencing policy with her work has written a Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology (POST) briefing note about policing domestic abuse.
Consider the impact of child sexual abuse on physical and mental health and the usefulness of psychological interventions to alleviate distress
Despite recent improvements to their training, a new study isuggests the police are as susceptible as the general public to holding false beliefs about psychology that apply to their work.
Event information This event aims to give attendees experience of how to use formulation in different settings, with different populations and for different behaviours.
Today’s proposal by the Law Commission to include psychologists in wider tests to assess defendants’ mental fitness when facing criminal charges has been welcomed by BPS President Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes.
The idea that children can't be held fully responsible for their crimes dates back thousands of years. Today, in many countries around the world, the principle is written into law as "The Age of Criminal Responsibility".
While restorative justice is becoming an increasingly common practice, psychologically informed research into its effects is relatively rare.
This workshop will prepare participants to work with offenders who have intellectual disability (ID). The workshop will cover the definition, diagnosis and clinical presentation of people with intellectual disability in order to equip part
This two day workshop bridges the gap between research & practice. Really practical content in trauma focused CBT underpinned with relational values. Timetable 1 March 2016
Event information The term Every Contact Matters (ECM) was coined by the Cambridge Institute of Criminology and emphasises the potential rehabilitative value of every interaction that takes place within the prison environment – between sta
The British Psychological Society is sponsoring three sessions at the Cheltenham Literature Festival as part of our work to bring insights from evidence-based science to a wider public.
As a juror in a criminal trial, you are meant to make a judgment of the defendant's guilt or innocence based on the evidence and arguments presented.
This workshop will include some PowerPoint presentation, but will incorporate group discussions and relevant sub-group exercises in order to facilitate learning. The workshop will cover:
Guest Speaker: Dr. Ruth Mann is an eminent forensic psychologist, working as Head of Evidence, in the Directorate of Commissioning and Contract Management in NOMS.
The 25th Division of Forensic Psychology Annual Conference (DFP) will be held in 2016 at the Hilton Brighton Metropole Hotel.
A report from a task force of the American Psychological Association has found that although violent video game play is linked to increased aggression in players, there is insufficient evidence to link such games with actual criminal violence.
There's a striking fact about mass murderers – an extremely high percentage (around 30 per cent) of them die in the act, either by suicide or because of deadly police force.
Members of the public have a fixed and faulty view of what stalkers look like, and this has potential implications for victims and court proceedings.   That is the finding of research presented today by Dr Simon Duff from the University of Nottingham to the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Forensic Psychology in Manchester.
The British Psychological Society has published a new position paper on ‘Children and young people with neuro-disabilities in the criminal justice system’.
The Scottish committee for the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFPS) are pleased to be able to offer a number of places on a one-day workshop ‘Working with Fire-setters’ held by the DFPS at Glasgow Caledonian University.
The general election manifestos of the UK’s political parties contain sweeping claims about the causes of crime and policies to reduce it. Experts, including members of the British Psychological Society, are warning today that such broad statements are nearly always wrong.
Syndicate content