Forensic

While restorative justice is becoming an increasingly common practice, psychologically informed research into its effects is relatively rare.
This workshop will prepare participants to work with offenders who have intellectual disability (ID). The workshop will cover the definition, diagnosis and clinical presentation of people with intellectual disability in order to equip part
This two day workshop bridges the gap between research & practice. Really practical content in trauma focused CBT underpinned with relational values. Timetable 1 March 2016
Event information The term Every Contact Matters (ECM) was coined by the Cambridge Institute of Criminology and emphasises the potential rehabilitative value of every interaction that takes place within the prison environment – between sta
The British Psychological Society is sponsoring three sessions at the Cheltenham Literature Festival as part of our work to bring insights from evidence-based science to a wider public.
As a juror in a criminal trial, you are meant to make a judgment of the defendant's guilt or innocence based on the evidence and arguments presented.
This workshop will include some PowerPoint presentation, but will incorporate group discussions and relevant sub-group exercises in order to facilitate learning. The workshop will cover:
Guest Speaker: Dr. Ruth Mann is an eminent forensic psychologist, working as Head of Evidence, in the Directorate of Commissioning and Contract Management in NOMS.
The 25th Division of Forensic Psychology Annual Conference (DFP) will be held in 2016 at the Hilton Brighton Metropole Hotel.
A report from a task force of the American Psychological Association has found that although violent video game play is linked to increased aggression in players, there is insufficient evidence to link such games with actual criminal violence.
There's a striking fact about mass murderers – an extremely high percentage (around 30 per cent) of them die in the act, either by suicide or because of deadly police force.
Members of the public have a fixed and faulty view of what stalkers look like, and this has potential implications for victims and court proceedings.   That is the finding of research presented today by Dr Simon Duff from the University of Nottingham to the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Forensic Psychology in Manchester.
The British Psychological Society has published a new position paper on ‘Children and young people with neuro-disabilities in the criminal justice system’.
The Scottish committee for the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFPS) are pleased to be able to offer a number of places on a one-day workshop ‘Working with Fire-setters’ held by the DFPS at Glasgow Caledonian University.
The general election manifestos of the UK’s political parties contain sweeping claims about the causes of crime and policies to reduce it. Experts, including members of the British Psychological Society, are warning today that such broad statements are nearly always wrong.
Their actions are criminal and they cause untold misery, but repeat burglars are skilled at what they do and in that sense they are experts.
A recent report, compiled by the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, has explored how often American courts currently use neuroscience in trials.
This year we have continued on exploring ways for us to develop ourselves as a professional body that leads the way on standards for forensic clinical psychological services.  We have committed to revising the guidance for Clinical Training C
There is a mistaken cultural assumption, says a new study, that women are, by their nature, incapable of being serial killers – defined here as murderers of three or more victims, spaced out with at least a week between killings.
DCP Faculty for Forensic Clinical Psychology - Spring Meeting
The morning will introduce psychological theories of suicide and focus on O'Connor's (2011) Interpersonal-Volitional Model (IMV) model of suicide, providing opportunity to develop  understanding of pathways to suicidal behaviour in offenders.
In a new study, published today in the British Psychological Society journal Legal and Criminology Psychology, researchers from the University of Surrey found further evidence to suggest that eyewitnesses to crimes remember more accurate details when they close their eyes.
Research suggests that using torture as a way to extract information or confessions from terror suspects isn't just unethical, it's also ineffective.
**THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED**
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