Forensic

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This is a deeply uncomfortable, powerful, and gripping film. It has deservedly won several awards, including Best International Feature Film at the Edinburgh Film Festival and two awards at the Sundance Film Festival. It contains two important messages: first, that power is dangerous; and second, that environments and ‘systems’ matter in the production of abuse.

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This 2-day workshop aims to provide participants with a detailed understanding of the impact of trauma on people in forensic settings, and to develop insights and skills to assist in responding to those affected by trauma.

Day 1:
Defining trauma
Prevalence of trauma
Trauma and maladaptive behaviour

Day 2:
Trauma assessment
Models of treatment theory and practice
Trauma informed shared formulation of problem behaviour

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Judges are not perfect, but we expect them to approach their cases clinically and with detachment, interpreting them on their merits, uninfluenced by stereotypes around skin colour, age, or … gender.

But a new study duscussed on our Research Digest blog has analysed the sentencing remarks made by judges in domestic murder cases (defined as murder between heterosexual spouses) and found that they framed killings by men in far more lenient and forgiving terms than killings by women.

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When the dust settles on the tragedy of the latest mass shooting, gun clubs usually see a spike in their memberships as people look to arm and defend themselves. At the same time, many others argue for greater gun controls, and from their perspective, recreational target shooting is very much part of the problem, not the answer.

Some initial findings from a study of this question have now been published. While not conclusive, they do suggest there is reason to worry about the psychological effects of gun club membership.

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Witnesses to crimes make fewer errors when they are interviewed together than when they are interviewed separately says a study published in the Journal of Legal and Criminological Psychology. This is contrary to current police guidelines that say to interview witnesses separately.

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‘Change has to come from within’: this workshop discusses how practitioners can promote intrinsic motivation in order to facilitate change.

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Psychologists can help police officers to understand and resist myths about rape victims in an effort to improve the current conviction rate for the crime.

That is the conclusion of research presented to the annual conference of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Forensic Psychology this week by Dr Anthony Murphy and Dr Ben Hine.

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When we think of crime scene forensics, it’s easy to view it as the objective end of criminal investigation. Witnesses waffle, suspects slide around from the truth, and jurors can be misled by emotive evidence.

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A clear and structured introduction to a number of current professional and ethical issues likely to be encountered within psychological practice

Timetable

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Former Ministry of Justice Chief Psychologist Graham Towl (University of Durham) has become chair of an innovative Sexual Violence Taskforce at the university – the first of its kind in the UK.

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The British Psychological Society has published new guidance on Access to Sexually Explicit Illegal Material for the Purpose of Assessment, Intervention and Research.

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Public and industry attention has been forced to focus on the psychological wellbeing of pilots and a lack of clinical psychological skill in aviation.

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Event information

3.00 – 3.15pm

DFP Wales – Dr Siriol David ‘DFP Vision for Wales’

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An in-depth interview with a formerly violent right-wing extremist has provided psychologists with rare insights into the processes of disengagement and deradicalisation.

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Event information

The Division of Forensic Psychology Northern Ireland in partnership with NIBPS and The Psychology Departments of The Open University in Ireland, University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast would like to invite you

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Are professionals better than the rest of us at spotting wrongdoing?

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This year we have continued on exploring ways for us to develop ourselves as a professional body that leads the way on standards for forensic clinical psychological services.  We are re-establishing closer links with the Division of Forensic

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If you've got some revision to do, get yourself a sketch pad and start drawing out the words or concepts that you want to remember.

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Event information

DFP Scotland presents 'Being a Trainee Forensic Psychologist in Scotland' followed by its AGM.

Talk starts at 3.15pm.

AGM starts at 4pm.

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Monday 5th September 2016 at BPS Offices, Tabernacle Street, London

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Wednesday 20th July 2016 at BPS Offices, Tabernacle Street, London

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A guest post from Richard Stephens on our Research Digest blog looks at recent research into the factors that may lead people to violence, and that may yet he

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Event information

10.15 - Visitors arrive at Grendon gate

10.45 - Visitors and residents go to Conference Centre

11.00 - Introduction to the day

11.10 - Presentation by Dr Karen Slade part 1

13.00 - Lunch

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Most people are poor at detecting whether someone is lying, at least partly because most people think mistakenly that things like shifty eye movements and fidgeting hands are reliable signs of deception.

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