Forensic

There's a striking fact about mass murderers – an extremely high percentage (around 30 per cent) of them die in the act, either by suicide or because of deadly police force.
Members of the public have a fixed and faulty view of what stalkers look like, and this has potential implications for victims and court proceedings.   That is the finding of research presented today by Dr Simon Duff from the University of Nottingham to the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Forensic Psychology in Manchester.
The British Psychological Society has published a new position paper on ‘Children and young people with neuro-disabilities in the criminal justice system’.
The Scottish committee for the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFPS) are pleased to be able to offer a number of places on a one-day workshop ‘Working with Fire-setters’ held by the DFPS at Glasgow Caledonian University.
The general election manifestos of the UK’s political parties contain sweeping claims about the causes of crime and policies to reduce it. Experts, including members of the British Psychological Society, are warning today that such broad statements are nearly always wrong.
Their actions are criminal and they cause untold misery, but repeat burglars are skilled at what they do and in that sense they are experts.
A recent report, compiled by the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, has explored how often American courts currently use neuroscience in trials.
This year we have continued on exploring ways for us to develop ourselves as a professional body that leads the way on standards for forensic clinical psychological services.  We have committed to revising the guidance for Clinical Training C
There is a mistaken cultural assumption, says a new study, that women are, by their nature, incapable of being serial killers – defined here as murderers of three or more victims, spaced out with at least a week between killings.
DCP Faculty for Forensic Clinical Psychology - Spring Meeting
The morning will introduce psychological theories of suicide and focus on O'Connor's (2011) Interpersonal-Volitional Model (IMV) model of suicide, providing opportunity to develop  understanding of pathways to suicidal behaviour in offenders.
In a new study, published today in the British Psychological Society journal Legal and Criminology Psychology, researchers from the University of Surrey found further evidence to suggest that eyewitnesses to crimes remember more accurate details when they close their eyes.
Research suggests that using torture as a way to extract information or confessions from terror suspects isn't just unethical, it's also ineffective.
The Division of Forensic Psychology Northern Ireland in partnership with NIBPS and The Psychology Departments of The Open University in Ireland, University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast would like to invite you to participate in a serie
The Division of Forensic Psychology Northern Ireland in partnership with NIBPS and The Psychology Departments of The Open University in Ireland, University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast would like to invite you to participate in a serie
The Division of Forensic Psychology Northern Ireland in partnership with NIBPS and The Psychology Departments of The Open University in Ireland, University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast would like to invite you to participate in a serie
The Division of Forensic Psychology Northern Ireland in partnership with NIBPS and The Psychology Departments of The Open University in Ireland, University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast would like to invite you to participate in a serie
Psychologists and psychiatrist are frequently called on to provide expert testimony in court.
On the back of research first published in 1970s and 19880s, an increasing number of jails in the Western world are painting their cells pink, in the belief that doing so has a calming effect on prisoners.
The British Psychological Society has issued its first forensic testing qualifications to Chartered members who applied via a ‘grandparenting’ route.
This workshop will describe the Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT) model in terms of the idea of integration, Reciprocal Role Procedures and the three R’s of CAT (Reformulation, Recognition and Revision).
This workshop will prepare participants to work with offenders who have intellectual disability (ID).
This workshop is designed to help continue to uphold and enhance our professional standards as psychologists (both qualified and in-training). Specifically this workshop aims to:
Learn about the process, challenges and dilemmas of group facilitation when working with different client or professional groups. Timetable
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