Education and Child Psychology

We’re often bombarded with panicky stories in the news about the dangers of letting children watch too much television or play too many video games.
When you’ve done something good, or performed a task well, it feels great to get some praise for it. And parents and teachers, especially in Western cultures, are encouraged to dole out praise to children in an increasingly generous manner.
Online gamers may be enjoying an expansion of their social lives, rather than suffering ill-effects because of its contraction, according to new research.
The government is considering bringing in a new law that would make it a punishable offence for parents to inflict emotional cruelty upon their children.
The psychological wellbeing of teachers is being threatened by ever-growing workloads and a range of other factors, a union representative has said in a speech.
The MindEd mental health project, which provides electronic learning materials on children’s mental health for anyone whose work or volunteering brings them into contact with young people, was launched at an event in London earlier this week.
Human beings can distinguish between people who are genuinely laughing and those who are faking it, according to new research.
Children could benefit if designers created playscapes instead of traditional playgrounds, according to new research.
There could be genetic factors at work when it comes to determining whether or not people are anxious about maths, according to a new
Children who experience stress are likely to face health problems in their lives, according to new research.
The government is considering introducing mindfulness sessions into schools.
A new report from the Anti-Bullying Alliance (ABA) has
Schools across the country will be enjoying literary fun and games as part of World Book Day today (6 March), but a new study from the University of Dundee has suggested youngsters might not be mainta
Children aren't as gullible as you might think. Early in life they display a discernment that psychologists call "epistemic vigilance".
Putting everyday items in school playgrounds could encourage children to play more creatively and engage in more physical activity, new research has suggested.
Children who frequently move schools could be more at risk than their peers of developing symptoms of psychosis, a new study has suggested.
Often Clinical and Educational Psychology work alongside each other, this workshop wishes to explore and promote the value of working together.
What happens if you drop a ball in a falling lift and why? Your answer will of course depend on the sophistication of your understanding of the laws of physics.
A new study has suggested that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may have issues when it comes to processing simultaneous information coming to their eyes and ears.
Analysis of international academic performance tests shows that being poor does not necessarily mean having a built-in propensity to underachieve, one analyst has claimed.
A new study has found that shy children are likely to understand just as much when they are being communicated with than their more confident peers, even though they ma
Caring for an animal could help young people to achieve a boost to their wellbeing, as well as strengthening their relationships with others in their communities.
Children are likely to have higher than average levels of cortisol if they are obese, new research has revealed.
Psychologists have long been aware that very few people are able to recall information from before the age of about three.
A new study has discovered that there are two different ways in which the brain is able to process numbers - and they both seem to depend on the structure of the organ as opposed to learnt methods.
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