Education and Child Psychology

The BPS Division of Educational and Child Psychology (DECP) is holding its Annual Conference in London from 6-8 January under the title ‘Towards an inclus
A study of over 2000 intermediate school students in New Zealand has revealed surprising differences in their levels of self-belief and goal setting, depending on their cultural background.
A new monograph published by the British Journal of Educational Psychology (BJEP) published today brings together evidence from psychological research to consider the nature and practice of learning beyond the classroom.
The 2016 British Psychological Society, Psychology of Education Section, Annual Conference theme is focusing on the role of learning environments and learning outcomes.
The BPS has welcomed the cross-party manifesto from the All Party Parliamentary Group 1001 Critical Days, which highlights how vital the early days of childhood are for parents and children.
Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes, the President of the British Psychological Society, has welcomed the announcement of a multi-million pound joint mental health pilot scheme for hundreds of schools by Education Secretary Nicky Morgan and NHS England.
A government Green Paper on teaching excellence, social mobility and student choice met with a fairly negative reaction from the academic community on its release last month.
Two of the synthetic phonics programmes, Letters and Sounds (L&S) and Early Reading Research (ERR), used by English primary schools to teach young children to read are equally effective overall says a paper published today in the British Journal of Educational Psychology.
Using examples from co-production practice, the workshop will explore the possibility of innovative public service reform that puts social justice, social networks and capacity building at the heart of service design and delivery.
Adults have 'episodic foresight'. They are able to look beyond their current physical state to anticipate being in a different state in the future, and thus plan accordingly.
Develop a deeper understanding of play and its inherent value for working with children and families. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
A critical look at the dominant discourses surrounding refugee and asylum seeking people and their responses to adversity Timetable
The Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction has been won for the first time by a science writer, with Steve Silberman picking up the award for 'Neurotribes', a book on autism and its history.
‘It’s an important time for serious research on play’, said Dr David Whitebread, launching the Play in Education Development and Learning Centre at the University of Cambridge.
An investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor pupil behaviour is to be expanded to cover the use of mobile phones.
How to prevent gender stereotyping of school subjects is one of the topics being discussed at the Opening Doors conference being held in London today (20 October).
Psychological health and wellbeing have been very much in the news over the last week or so with World Mental Health Week and the
The British Psychological Society and our publishing partner Wiley are proud to support the 2015 World Mental Health Day with a selection of free BPS Journals based around this year's theme of 'Dignity in Mental Health'.
'Interaction partners of high-status adolescents may keep a low profile because they are aware of the capabilities of the high-status influential peer,' say the authors of a new paper. Read more on our Research Digest blog.
Professor Peter Fonagy has won the Wiley Prize for lifetime achievement in psychology.  The British Academy awards the prize every two years to an outstanding international scholar and it has never before gone to a British academic.
Watching toddlers pinch, hit and bite each other doesn't fill you with confidence about human nature. But there's no need to be down about it – the little devils don't yet have the self-control to manage their anger and frustration, that's all.
A report from a task force of the American Psychological Association has found that although violent video game play is linked to increased aggression in players, there is insufficient evidence to link such games with actual criminal violence.
The Society’s Ethics Committee has hosted a discussion meeting on the tricky ethics of carrying out research involving looked-after children.
Over the summer it seems that not a day has gone by without a story about children and mental health being in the news.
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