Developmental Psychology

Adults have 'episodic foresight'. They are able to look beyond their current physical state to anticipate being in a different state in the future, and thus plan accordingly.
This workshop is an introduction to traumatic stress, examining trauma from evolutionary, historical and symptoms perspectives.
The Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction has been won for the first time by a science writer, with Steve Silberman picking up the award for 'Neurotribes', a book on autism and its history.
‘It’s an important time for serious research on play’, said Dr David Whitebread, launching the Play in Education Development and Learning Centre at the University of Cambridge.
The British Psychological Society and our publishing partner Wiley are proud to support the 2015 World Mental Health Day with a selection of free BPS Journals based around this year's theme of 'Dignity in Mental Health'.
'Interaction partners of high-status adolescents may keep a low profile because they are aware of the capabilities of the high-status influential peer,' say the authors of a new paper. Read more on our Research Digest blog.
The pressure to be cool, look good and own the right stuff is detrimental to many children and teenagers, according to research presented at a symposium last week at a British Psychological Society conference.
The need to be constantly available and respond 24/7 on social media accounts can cause depression, anxiety and decrease sleep quality for teenagers says a study presented at a British Psychological Society conference in Manchester.
Watching toddlers pinch, hit and bite each other doesn't fill you with confidence about human nature. But there's no need to be down about it – the little devils don't yet have the self-control to manage their anger and frustration, that's all.
A report from a task force of the American Psychological Association has found that although violent video game play is linked to increased aggression in players, there is insufficient evidence to link such games with actual criminal violence.
The link between the mind and brain is tricky enough for expert psychologists and neuroscientists to grapple with, let alone young children. Nonetheless, they grow up with their own naive understanding. 
Young adults – defined here as people aged 18 to 29 – are the most skilled liars, while teens are the most prolific.
Paediatricians' offices are often adorned with a developmental milestone chart for infants, and they always show the same "normal" age-typical progression, from sitting to crawling to walking. But these expectations (e.g.
A study in the British Journal of Psychology that suggested a single supportive close friendship can help young people from low-income backgrounds to thrive in challenging circumstances is available free-to-access for two weeks. 
The Psychologist will be making an appearance at a major UK festival this month. ‘The Psychologist and Wellcome Trust presents…’ slot at the Latitude Festival pairs Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore with author Fiona Neill for a discussion on ‘Being Young Never Gets Old – Teenagers Debunked’.
A group of science lectures held in pubs across UK cities in May included three nights of psychology and neurobiology talks in Birmingham. The Pint of Science Festival takes place in nine countries and 50 cities across the same three nights, and on the second evening the Birmingham audience heard talks on animals and children.
Children and adults with dyslexia have reading skills that are weak relative to their overall intelligence. That's why it is often referred to as "specific learning disability".
There is probably nothing more fun than making a baby or toddler laugh. And now there's news that it could even help with learning – the toddlers' not the adults'.
"The Culture of Poverty”, published in 1966, was hugely influential, persuading many policy makers that children from low-income families are destined for lives of “criminality, joblessness, and poverty” because they exist in enclaves characterise
For adults, let alone children, time is a tricky concept to comprehend.
2014 was a very busy year for the Developmental Section. Highlights of our Section activities this year include a fantastic annual conference in Amsterdam and the development of our grants scheme for section members.
The British Psychological Society welcomes the announcement of a five-year plan for a complete overhaul of mental health services for children and young people in England.
The British Psychological Society welcomes the announcement by Treasury Secretary Danny Alexander that extra funding will be provided to improve mental health services in England in this week’s Budget.
These days it's hard to avoid the message that thin is best. From advertising billboards to the Oscar red carpet, we are inundated with images of successful ultra-thin women.
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