Cognition

Face blindness, which is otherwise known as prosopagnosia and is characterised by impairments regarding face recognition, could be temporarily improved thanks to inhalation of the hormone oxytocin.
A small number of people ‘see’ colours with different numbers and letters and this may give them an advantage at learning subtle patterns that the rest of us miss, suggests an study presented last week at the British Psychological Society’s Joint Cognitive and Developmental annual conference in Reading.
Welcome to the Cognitive Psychology Section! The Cognitive Psychology section of the British Psychological Society was formed in 1978 as a national forum for the discussion of research and issues of professional concern to cognitive psycho
Preterm birth could have a negative impact on a child's cognitive ability.
A link has been discovered between depression in Alzheimer's patients and a declining ability to handle daily activities.
A person's mental alertness can be improved with uplifting music, new research has suggested.
Chewing gum can help you stay focused for longer on tasks that require continuous monitoring. This is the finding of new research by Kate Morgan and colleagues from Cardiff University published in the British Journal of Psychology last week. 
How high altitude presents unique challenges for the human body will be discussed by Society member Dr Dominika Dykiert, University of Edinburgh, at the Edinburgh Science Festival, Saturday April 6 at 5:30.
A person's cognitive skills can be impacted when they have a cold, new research has suggested.
The joint conference of the British Psychological Society's Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Sections will take place in Reading.  CogDev2013 will bring in many of the leaders in cognitive and developmental psychology from the UK and Eu
Why older people are less likely to seek help when depressed and how they can access the right help are just two of the topics being discussed on a radio programme called ‘The Wireles
When we're making a snap judgement about a fact, the mere presence of an accompanying photograph makes us more likely to think it's true, even when the photo doesn't provide any
Some police officers are far better than others at recognising people glimpsed in CCTV footage, research presented at a Society Conference today will show.
We think we remember the music we listen to really well, but new research suggests we may be mistaken.
The Society Cognitive Psychology Section's Annual Conference is taking place this week at the Menzies Hotel, Glasgow.
Honorary Fellow of the British Psychological Society, Professor Annette Karmiloff-Smith, will be awarded the Fondation Mattei Dogan Prize in Psychological Science this week.
The Annual Cognitive Section Conference is the principal means by which the Section serves its membership and this year’s event was held in September at Keele University.
Neuropsychologists in The Netherlands and the UK have documented the curious case of a 62-year-old stroke patient whose brain damage affected her perception of familiar faces whilst leaving her perception of unfamiliar faces intact.
The 2014 Learning and Professional Development Directory is now available. Download the 2014 Directory. The 20
The Section is pleased to announce their 2012 conference will be taking place at the Menzies Hotel, Glasgow.
The ability of how well a person is able to maintain friendships may be partly dependent on their brain size.
Experimental psychologist Professor Bruce Hood, director of the Bristol Cognitive Development Centre at the University of Bristol, will give this year’s Royal Institution Christmas Lectures.
Our perception of the world is so restricted by the brain's finite attentional resources that large changes to the visual scene can occur without us noticing.
The brain has its own jukebox - a personal sound system for your private listening pleasure. The downside is that it has a mind of its own.
Music can influence how wine tastes, a study has found. The research, which appears in the Society’s British Journal of Psychology, was undertaken by Professor Adrian North, a Chartered Psychologist from Heriot Watt University. Professor North examined the taste perceptions of 250 students as they drank wine and listened to music.
Syndicate content