Cognition

Regularly eating fruit and vegetables may help people feel engaged and that their life is purposeful and meaningful, a study from the British Journal of H
People who experience lucid dreams are likely to be better problem-solvers while they are awake than their counterparts who do not, according to a new study.
A person who is suffering from depression might experience a further blow to their self-confidence if they consider themselves to be afflicted by a mental illness.
The reading skills of disadvantaged children can be enhanced if they undergo musical training, a new study has found.
Environmental distractions are more likely to impair the memory and cognitive processes of older people than their younger counterparts, a new
People's cognitive biases can lead to the content of a narrative altering over time, a study has found.
Children and adults who learn musical instruments could enjoy improved cognitive function, a new study has suggested.
Simply being exposed to alcohol-related words could be enough to trigger aggression, regardless of whether a person has actually consumed any alcohol or not, according to a new
Thinking about "the stuff of thought" sounds self-absorbed and irrelevant for our survival, but an opinion piece in the journal Trends in Cognitive Science says otherwise.
In a new video released today to coincide with the 30th birthday of one of the most popular and successful computer games ever, Tetris,  BPS Associate Fellow Dr Tom Stafford explains the psychology behind its enduring appeal. 
A new study has suggested that meditation could help the brain to process more thoughts and emotions than would be the case during simple rest.
A psychologist has said that recent studies suggesting cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) are ineffective for treating psychosis and could be missing the point about its effects on patients.
Understanding what self-control is and how it works has fascinated cognitive psychologists for decades, and more recently has led to the idea that perhaps we can harness our knowledge of cognition to temper compulsive behaviours.
Psychology is coming to terms with the idea that replication is a vital ingredient in the recipe of discovery.
Being able to recognise faces well - or not - appears to be an inherited ability, according to new research to be presented at the British Psychological Society's annual con
Anxiety about a competitive situation makes even the most physically active more likely to slip-up suggests a study presented today at the British Psychological Society annual conference in Birmingham.
People swear more colourfully when they are in a emotionally aroused state; this suggests swearing is closely related to emotion.
The cognitive cost or benefit of booze depends on your genes, suggests a new study which uses a unique longitudinal data set.
Our use of laughter and swearing as forms of emotional expression are two of the topics featured in a new BPS series of audio interviews with prominent psychologists.
Children learn and understand the meaning of verbs when shown a variety of similar actions, rather than the same action repeatedly suggests research published this week in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology.
Patients with Body Dysmorphic Disorder  (BDD) could benefit from being given cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as a form of treatment, a new study has suggested.
We often dream about what we've been doing and who we've been with, so it should come as little surprise to discover many psychotherapists dream about their clients.
A new study conducted at New York University has suggested that the capacity of the working memory should be measured by the quality of memories stored, rather than by the quantity.
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