Work and Business

This event is fully booked.  This workshop will appeal to those already working in private practice who wish to gain more advanced insights and skills relating to practice, as well as trainees and those who aim to set up in private pr
Organisation culture is widely recognised as one of the most powerful drivers of business performance, and is arguably one of the most exciting and demanding areas to work in occupational psychology.  This workshop will equip participants to
This workshop provides a basis for understanding how creativity and innovation underpin the achievement of both strategic objectives and day to day targets in organisations, and how creativity and innovation can be practically applied at work.
'Derailment' occurs when a manager with a great track record hits the skids, often spectacularly. It's highly undesirable, for the disruption and human harm it can involve, and its costs.
This event is fully booked. 
This event is fully booked.  In organisations people spend up to 80% of their time in conversation. “Talk” is our key action tool – and often a neglected discipline.
The behaviour of the managerial team within a company can trickle down through the business, new research has shown.
A person's happiness at work can depend on the incomes of their colleagues.
People are more likely to cherish their job if the role suits their signature strengths.
Looking at cute images of animals may improve a person's performance in the workplace according to new research published in the online edition of the US jour
Corruption and bad practice remain an issue in institutions. External governance and regulation offers some protection, but issues can remain invisible to outsiders.
Our Occupational Digest discusses a new paper on on emotional labour.
Stephen Lea, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Exeter, is speaking at fringe meetings being held as part of the Labour and Conservative Party Conferences this month.
People feel bored when they are unable to engage in satisfying activity.
Women who return to work shortly after having children experience better mental and physical health in terms of mobility and energy at age 40 than their stay-at-home counterparts.
The importance of hindsight bias should not be dismissed.
Many people who are laid off by a company would be willing to put any ill feeling behind them and return to their former employer.
Bosses may not be to blame for the stress individuals feel at work.
Employers could make a number of adjustments to their workplace to benefit staff with mental health issues.
People may be more likely to change if they are nudged towards something rather than told to do it.
Feeling blue on a Monday is considered common, but new research has revealed workers experience similar misery every day of the week except for Friday.
Serving customers with a smile must be tough if you're not in the mood. In the end, though, sales employees who are more smiley may end up reaping the benefit.
A television show is to look at reasons why women rarely reach the top in the business world. BBC Two's Hilary Devey's Women at the Top sees Coventry University Professor and Chartered Psychologist, Rosalind Searle offering her thoughts on the subject.
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