Work and Business

Young people are more likely to enjoy lucrative and rewarding careers if they are mentored during their youth, a new study has revealed.
If psychological tests are to be used to judge whether jobseekers have a psychological resistance to work, they must be administered by experienced users of psychometrics and proper feedback must be provided.
Being on top of "who knows what" is crucial for any team. But how is this team meta-knowledge (knowledge of who knows what) best handled?
Feeling bad at work can actually lead to favourable outcomes, a new study has suggested.
Livening up sparse office environments with plants could make employees happier and businesses more profitable, according to a new study from Cardiff University.
Customers are more likely to stay loyal to a brand if they are made to feel valued, a new study has found.
Please celebrate with us @ City Hall on the evening of
Seminar to Coincide with UK National Work-Life Balance Week Friday 26 September 2014, 2pmBPS London
The physical environment in which nurses work can have a big effect on their job satisfaction levels, according to new
Security is more of a priority to people with a higher job status than privacy, according to a new study.
Retailers who evoke feelings of times past could make shoppers more willing to spend lots of money, according to a new
It’s hard to find the best person for the job through an interview. New research uncovers part of the problem: judging a candidate’s calibre becomes trickier when we’re also trying to sell them the benefits of joining the organisation.
People are more likely to cooperate with others later in life, a new study has revealed.
Many of you will be aware of the consultation we ran this summer on the review of the stage 2 Qualification in Occupational Psychology.
People who take part-time jobs during their teenage years are boosting their ability to succeed later in life, a new study has found.
The decisions made by financial traders are often heavily influenced by early warning signals sent from the brain, according to new research.
If you're in or not far from your thirties, you're part of the age group that previous research shows is most likely to experience lower workplace wellbeing.
Most employees are not conscious of how they are regarded by their colleagues, a new study has revealed.
IQ was once the only game in town. Now it rubs shoulders with a gaggle of human ability measures such as Emotional Intelligence, Empathy Quotient and Rationality Quotient.
Experts say that spending more time standing at work is good for your physical well-being. Now there's another reason to ditch your office chair. According to psychologists in the US, standing improves group brainstorming sessions.
Congratulations to the three psychologists who were recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours. Cary Cooper CBE, who is Distinguished Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health at Lancaster University and an Honorary Fellow of the British Psychological Society, was knighted for his services to social science.
What prevents icy relations between two team members chilling the climate for everyone? New research suggests that it’s not enough simply to have plenty of chances to communicate.
A crisis changes everything. Friends are gone, and survivors must adapt to a new, dangerous environment. In the aftermath, predators circle to exploit the weak and vulnerable.
Nursing must be one of the most stressful professions. Not only are the hours long and the work challenging, many nurses are exposed routinely to patient suffering and death.
That is one of the questions that Professor Alan Lewis from Bath University, a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, will be seeking to answer at the Cheltenham Science Festival next week.He will be speaking with Paul Lewis from the BBC Radio Four programme ‘Money Box’.
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