Work and Business

Introverts have received a lot of positive press in recent years thanks to the run-away success of Susan Cain's book Quiet: The Power of Introverts.
Nearly four workers in ten would not let their boss know if they were suffering with a mental health problem, a new
Employees who face hostility from their bosses often feel better if they are prepared to reciprocate, a new study has suggested.
An unfair, uncaring manager makes for an uncertain working life, one characterised by stress, absenteeism and poor performance.
Meetings in some organisations would be more cost effective and focused, taking less time, if employees had the opportunity to give feedback on how they are run and were involved in making improvements says a study presented at the British Ps
Some mental health workers find it difficult to recognise their own burnout and even when they do they struggle to admit it to others says a study presented today at the British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology annual conference in Glasgow.
Employees who are suffering from burnout are more likely to make spontaneous and irrational decisions.
Whilst university degrees and work experience offer value in terms of employees’ work performance, neither prepare individuals for the softer people skills necessary in the workplace.
High quality me-time not only improves your psychological wellbeing it can also make you a more engaged employee.
People who are likely to feel guilty for any wrongdoings could make particularly good employees, a new study has indicated.
Employees using various technological devices to stay 'switched on' for work outside of office hours may face detrimental effects to their wellbeing and private life says a study presented today at the British Psychological Society’s Division of Occupational Psychology annual conference in Glasgow.
When high-ranking members of an organisation break the rules, it's not just their own reputation on the line. New research from Stanford University shows that the stain of transgression sends its fingers out to every organisational member.
People working in prisons and in secure hospitals in the UK may be at considerable risk of work-related stress, exhaustion and depression says a study presented today at the British Psychological Society’s Division of Occupational Psychology conference in Glasgow. 
Employees are often happier if they openly discuss their religious beliefs in the workplace, according to a Kansas State University researcher.
Changes in the workplace do not always have a negative effect on employees, a suggests a study published in the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Employers could benefit from a more productive workforce if they introduce family-friendly policies, a new study has found.
Experts in coaching psychology are meeting to celebrate the 10th birthday of the British Psychological Society's Special Group in Coaching Psychology (SGCP) at its 2014 International Congr
Managers and their employees could create a happier, more productive working atmosphere by being honest about their opinions of one another, new research has suggested.
“Women continue to be underrepresented in organisational life, in professions such as surgery and in roles such as leadership.
Men are being driven away from macho occupations like surgery and the Royal Marines because they don’t feel that they are ‘man enough’, according to new research.
The acoustic properties of a person's voice can change in relation to how powerful they are, a new study has revealed.
People who are looking for creative solutions to problems might be better off if they do not "think outside the box", new research has indicated.
Across different professions, many people are familiar with the sense of having to deliver more with less, meaning clocking-off time falls later and later. 
Three free public events on psychology are being held during our Division of Clinical Psychology’s Annual Conference in Glasgow next week. The conference takes place at t he Raddison Blu Hotel, 301 Argyle Street, Glasgow.
Mid-level managers are likely to show signs of "hermit crab syndrome" if they do not feel their ideas are being reflected in top management decisions, a new study has found
Syndicate content