Work and Business

Chartered Psychologist Dr Joanna Wilde has been elected as one of the directors of the Council for Work and Health. Dr Wilde is also the lead for work and health policy within the British Psychological Society and its representative on the Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (Employment).
Cross your fingers, touch wood, and don’t forget the rabbit’s foot. What leads people to put faith in such habits?
The British Psychological Society has called upon all parties contesting the general election to describe the measures that they would put in place within 100 days of taking office to create an NHS culture that supports positive patient outcomes through building a supportive working environment for all NHS staff.
A new study discussed on our Research Digest blog looks at the benefits to employers of allowing staff to personalise their own workspaces.
We're told sitting is the new smoking and that we should consider working at standing desks, or perhaps better still, treadmill desks.
We are beginning to understand that single individuals can have a disproportionate impact on group performance.
You've probably heard that sleep psychologists like to divide people up into those who function optimally in the morning, and those who come alive at night. The former, 'larks', tend to get up and go to bed earlier than 'owls'.
If you would do anything to stay popular with your team-mates, what might follow? Bending the rules? Cheating? Sabotage of rivals?
UK growth and prosperity will falter without a better grasp of human behaviour and public attitudes, especially in the service sector of the economy.
Recruiters are poor at inferring applicants' personalities from their CVs, but that doesn’t stop them from jumping to conclusions on the back of their flawed assumptions.
There are some walks of life where trying to be right as often as possible is not enough. Just as important is having insight into the likely accuracy of your own knowledge.
Science suggests a funnier workplace should be a more effective one, encouraging positive mood and a playful, open approach. But much of the evidence to date rests on theoretical argument or lab experiments.
British Psychological Society, Research Seminar Series 2015: Exploring the ‘always on culture’.
Recognition of the important role psychology has in the Freedom to Speak Up Review is welcomed by the British Psychological Society.
British Psychological Society, Research Seminar Series 2015: Exploring the ‘always on culture’.
British Psychological Society, Research Seminar Series 2015: Exploring the ‘always on culture’.
When a team rarely gets to be in a room together, it misses out on many of the in-person subtle cues that help members make sense of their relationships.
Introverts have received a lot of positive press in recent years thanks to the run-away success of Susan Cain's book Quiet: The Power of Introverts.
Nearly four workers in ten would not let their boss know if they were suffering with a mental health problem, a new
Employees who face hostility from their bosses often feel better if they are prepared to reciprocate, a new study has suggested.
An unfair, uncaring manager makes for an uncertain working life, one characterised by stress, absenteeism and poor performance.
Meetings in some organisations would be more cost effective and focused, taking less time, if employees had the opportunity to give feedback on how they are run and were involved in making improvements says a study presented at the British Ps
Some mental health workers find it difficult to recognise their own burnout and even when they do they struggle to admit it to others says a study presented today at the British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology annual conference in Glasgow.
Employees who are suffering from burnout are more likely to make spontaneous and irrational decisions.
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