Trauma

Patients who are treated in intensive care units often experience hallucinations and delusions and can be more troubled by memories of them than by memories of real events.
Experiencing a burglary is a serious threat to people's mental health, a survey has confirmed.
Despite having to kill in combat being perhaps the most traumatic experience a soldier can suffer, those who do so may be less likely to abuse alcohol than their peers who never take a life during their service, a new
A simple, five-question screening tool could be used to indicate whether or not armed services veterans pose a risk of violence, researchers believe.
Giving armed forces personnel training in mindfulness techniques could help them to prepare for and recover from stressful combat situations, according to a new study.
Another study has found a link between a stay in an intensive care unit and patients developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes, President Elect of the British Psychological Society is to take part in a session on ‘The Psychology of War’ at the Cheltenham Science Festival this week.
Imagine having a miscarriage and keeping it secret because you’d get the blame for your pregnancy loss? We might believe that only happened in the past, but it is a situation faced by countless women every day.
Welcome to the website for our 2015 Annual Conference to be held on 5-7 May at the ACC Liverpool which is located on the banks of the River Mersey right next to the iconic Albert Dock.
The centenary of the First World War provides the Society with an opportunity t
Women who experience domestic abuse are significantly more likely to experience postpartum mental health issues than mothers who do not, according to a new study.
Soldiers who have returned home from conflict zones may be facing identity struggles that could have a negative impact on their mental health as they transition to civilian life.
Campaigners are urging the Government to criminalise types of psychological abuse to save more victims of domestic violence.
Humanitarian organisations are not doing enough to protect aid workers from the psychological effects of the suffering they witness during assignments, a psychologist has argued.
The mental health of UK soldiers is stronger than that of their peers from the US, according to new research from King's College London (KCL).
A project has been launched that aims to reduce the number of cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experienced by patients who have stayed in hospital intensive care units (ICUs).  
Repeatedly viewing media images of disturbing events such as terrorist attacks could have a negative effect on people's mental health, according to a new
As a tragedy unfolds, only the callous or gauche would joke about it. Yet with time, topics previously off limits come to be seen as fair game for humour.
Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) put people at a greater risk of early death than the general population even when they appear to have fully recovered, according to a new stud
People who experience the effects of war early in their lives are likely to seek greater solidarity within their group and do all they can to ensure equality between members is achieved. New
Soldiers and other service members whose mental health is negatively affected by conflict could see their symptoms improved through the use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), a new
The Royal College of Physicians has today launched new guidelines on the diagnosis and management of people with prolonged disorders of consciousness. They should help healthcare staff, families, carers, friends and others understand the clinical, ethical and legal issues surrounding the care of these patients.
This workshop will provide ways of working with complex trauma, dissociation and the body. 
The latest version of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) controversial diagnostic code - "the DSM-5" - continues the check-list approach used in previous editions.
A British Journal of Surgery podcast has touched on the psychological effects on surgeons when things go wrong in the operating theatre.
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