Trauma

The idea that natural disasters bring people together receives some support in a new study published in the British Journal of Social Psychology.
A woman's memories of giving birth are more heavily influenced by the intensity of the labour, rather than the length, according to a new study.
As the British Army leaves Afghanistan today, it is a time for reflection. Inevitably there will be transitions to be negotiated. Our Wessex Branch’s Annual Military Psychology Conference at the Defence Academy, Shrivenham, will focus on these transitions from the perspective of different stakeholders.
The Third Military Psychological Wellbeing Conference organised by the British Psychological Society's Wessex Branch takes place on 5 and 6 November 2014.
Many service personnel who have committed suicide did so because of traumatic experiences prior to their enlistment, according to a new study.
The development of psychology during and after the First World War was discussed at the annual public 'Stories of Psychology' symposium organised by the BPS History of Psychology Centre (HOPC) at the University of London today.
Services for the UK's veterans and their families are “patchy and poorly coordinated,” Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes from Anglia Ruskin University will tell a conference today.
Servicemen and women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) could benefit from trying breathing-based meditation, a new
A half-day conference on understanding and managing psychological trauma is taking place at the University of Ulster, Coleraine, this week (Monday 1 September).
The Special Group for Psychology and Social Care has organised a Master Class on Working with Attachment and Trauma
Overview: The morning session will be an opportunity to hear about recent research undertaken within local services, mostly trainee projects or service evaluations. Further projects will be displayed as posters. 
Children are more likely to experience mental health difficulties if they live in an area hit by war, terrorism and extensive military activity, new research has revealed.
In the wake of the shooting down of MH17 and other recent disasters, Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes from Anglia Ruskin University, President Elect of the British Psychological Society, has been commenting on the impor
Patients who are treated in intensive care units often experience hallucinations and delusions and can be more troubled by memories of them than by memories of real events.
Experiencing a burglary is a serious threat to people's mental health, a survey has confirmed.
Despite having to kill in combat being perhaps the most traumatic experience a soldier can suffer, those who do so may be less likely to abuse alcohol than their peers who never take a life during their service, a new
A simple, five-question screening tool could be used to indicate whether or not armed services veterans pose a risk of violence, researchers believe.
Giving armed forces personnel training in mindfulness techniques could help them to prepare for and recover from stressful combat situations, according to a new study.
Another study has found a link between a stay in an intensive care unit and patients developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes, President Elect of the British Psychological Society is to take part in a session on ‘The Psychology of War’ at the Cheltenham Science Festival this week.
Imagine having a miscarriage and keeping it secret because you’d get the blame for your pregnancy loss? We might believe that only happened in the past, but it is a situation faced by countless women every day.
Welcome to the website for our 2015 Annual Conference to be held on 5-7 May at the ACC Liverpool which is located on the banks of the River Mersey right next to the iconic Albert Dock.
The centenary of the First World War provides the Society with an opportunity t
Women who experience domestic abuse are significantly more likely to experience postpartum mental health issues than mothers who do not, according to a new study.
Soldiers who have returned home from conflict zones may be facing identity struggles that could have a negative impact on their mental health as they transition to civilian life.
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