Technology

Two-thirds of parents surveyed in a recent study fear social media is bad for their child, yet they use it extensively themselves.
Online troublemakers tend to be socially well connected. Some Facebook users therefore, remain friends online with troublemakers because they are worried about the repercussions if they ‘unfriend’ them.
The British Psychological Society is pleased to announce that on behalf of the Science Council we can now confer two new designations. These are:
Event information Third in the [email protected] Seminar Series.  Technology has transformed how we apply psychology to assessment and selection over the last 15 years; but what happens next?
A big problem with being sarcastic in your texts or emails, of course, is that you can't use tone of voice or a cheeky smile to ensure your recipient realises that you're not being literal.
Research presented at the BPS Division of Occupational Psychology's annual conference later this week suggests that it’s not just the volume of emails that causes stress; it’s our well-intentioned habits and our need to feel in control that backfires on us.
Use client/participant biometric phone apps to collect/email data to you, for naturalistic data in daily life contexts for research/therapy. Timetable
Event information Virtual Reality in Psychological Therapy and Research Virtual Reality (VR) is currently enjoying a surge in popularity due to emerging technologies such as the Oculus Rift, the HTC Vive, and the Samsung Gear VR.
Event information This informal graduate network event is directed towards recently graduated psychologists interested in developing their careers outside the frame of the recognized psychology specialisms.
The commonly held stereotype of the IT guy (or girl) – which must be one of the most stereotyped occupations in the world – as good with machines and programming code, but lousy with people and emotions.
An investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor pupil behaviour is to be expanded to cover the use of mobile phones.
The need to be constantly available and respond 24/7 on social media accounts can cause depression, anxiety and decrease sleep quality for teenagers says a study presented at a British Psychological Society conference in Manchester.
A report from a task force of the American Psychological Association has found that although violent video game play is linked to increased aggression in players, there is insufficient evidence to link such games with actual criminal violence.
For many shy people, online social networking sites have an obvious appeal – a way to socialise without the unpredictable immediacy of a face-to-face encounter.
The methods used to alert members of the public in the UK to civil emergencies vary by location. Systems currently used include door knocking, landline phone calls, PA systems, loudhailers and even church bells.
Stigma is a problem for all forms of mental illness, but arguably obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) – a condition that at its most severe can ruin lives – is subject to a disproportionate amount of trivialisation and ridicule.
Identifying with a specific group of online gamers, such those who play Football Manager, can help gamers’ overall feelings of psychological wellbeing. This finding by Dr Linda Kaye from Edge Hill University was presented today at the Annual Conference of the British Psychology Society in Liverpool earlier this week.
Viewing violent news events via social media can cause people to experience symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Psychologists are to improve online health information on lung cancer after research showed that family members are more likely to search online to encourage loved ones to seek help.  
Young people are aware of the risks of cyberbullying but perceive others as being more at risk than themselves. Young women are more vulnerable to this perception than young men. 
The Dorset Hub of the British Psychological Society’s Wessex Branch and Bournemouth University are staging a cyberpsychology symposium. The event takes place on the afternoon of Thursday 7 May at the university’s Talbot Campus in Poole.
British Psychological Society, Research Seminar Series 2015: Exploring the ‘always on culture’.
British Psychological Society, Research Seminar Series 2015: Exploring the ‘always on culture’.
British Psychological Society, Research Seminar Series 2015: Exploring the ‘always on culture’.
When a team rarely gets to be in a room together, it misses out on many of the in-person subtle cues that help members make sense of their relationships.
Syndicate content