Learning Disabilities/Difficulties

Programme 10.15Transforming Care and the Role of Clinical Psychologists.
Saturday 2 April is World Autism Awareness Day. To mark the occasion, Professor Sir Michael Rutter has written an article asking 'What should we be aware of on World Autism Awareness Day?' for a special electronic edition of our magazine The Psychologist.
This week marks the first ever Schools’ Autism Awareness Week, which aims to encourage schools to educate students about the behaviours and characteristics of autism.
Monday 5th September 2016 at BPS Offices, Tabernacle Street, London
Monday 23rd May 2016 - Tuesday 24th May 2016 at BPS Offices, Tabernacle Street, London
Professor Robin Morris is to receive this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award from the British Psychological Society’s Professional Practice Board.
A versatile approach to group self-discovery and behaviour change; working from practice back to theory
Working with interpreters may provide an opportunity to develop new skills and to enrich our understanding of diverse cultures, idioms of distress, diverse explanatory health beliefs and constructions of well-being and mental health.
Psychologists, teachers and social workers need help in working effectively with traumatised children and connecting them to family and school supports
This workshop covers essential aspects of diagnosis and assessment of psychological trauma.
Consider the impact of child sexual abuse on physical and mental health and the usefulness of psychological interventions to alleviate distress
Event information First in the [email protected] Seminar Series. This seminar will show how coaching psychology can improve workplace performance, self-efficacy, and harness neurodiverse creativity.
Better detection rates for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) mean the chances of having a colleague with the diagnosis, or being diagnosed yourself, have never been so high. But what’s it like to be "working while ASD"?
Autistic girls are more socially motivated and have more intimate friendships than autistic boys, but are not as good as girls without autism at recognising conflict in those friendships.
Event information This exciting CPD event will be of value to anyone with an interest in assessment and therapy for gender identity and sexuality issues in children, adolescents and adults
Two of the keynote sessions at the annual conference of our Division of Clinical Psychology have been opened to the general public. On Wednesday 2 December (17.30-18.30) Paul Farmer, chief executive of Mind will speak on 'Supporting better access to talking therapies – findings from the Mental Health Taskforce'.
The Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction has been won for the first time by a science writer, with Steve Silberman picking up the award for 'Neurotribes', a book on autism and its history.
Event information A last chance opportunity for any aspiring Clinical Psychologists that identify as being from a minority group such as BME, LGBTQ, or disability to hear from lecturers of London courses talking about the applica
Children and adults with dyslexia have a specific learning difficulty that mainly affects the development of their literacy and language-related skills.
This joint CPD event is informed by discussions between the Faculties for People with Intellectual Disabilities and for Children & Young People’s regarding areas of common concern, not least recognition of limited progress in the post-Winterbo
A participant in the television series The Undateables is one of the keynote speakers at the Annual Conference of the Faculty for People with Intellectual Disabilities.
Children diagnosed with autism often have distinctive sensory experiences, such as being ultra sensitive to noise, or finding enjoyment in repeated, unusual sensory stimulation.
This has been a very busy year for the Faculty for People with Intellectual Disabilities.  We have continued to work in 4 main areas:  the National Arena, Working in Partnership with other organisations, working with the BPS/DCP and supp
Children with autism can become more assertive if they have grown up with pets in the home, suggests a new study.
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