Law and Crime

Advance Decisions can be a crucial element of planning for ‘a good death’ – empowering individuals & enabling person-centred care. Timetable
This workshop will prepare participants to work with offenders who have intellectual disability (ID). The workshop will cover the definition, diagnosis and clinical presentation of people with intellectual disability in order to equip part
Learn how to choose, interpret and use psychometric assessments as an Expert Witness in court. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
Learn how to choose, interpret and use psychometric assessments as an Expert Witness in court. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
Learn how to present your Expert Witness Testimony to the courts and be prepared to face challenges made by the legal profession. Timetable
Learn how to present your Expert Witness Testimony to the courts and be prepared to face challenges made by the legal profession. Timetable
Learn how to choose, interpret and use psychometric assessments as an Expert Witness in court. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
Learn how to present your Expert Witness Testimony to the courts and be prepared to face challenges made by the legal profession. Timetable
Learn how the Expert Witness Report is the foundation of Expert Witness work and how it should meet the court’s expectations. Timetable
Learn how the Expert Witness Report is the foundation of Expert Witness work and how it should meet the court’s expectations. Timetable
Learn how the Expert Witness Report is the foundation of Expert Witness work and how it should meet the court’s expectations. Timetable
Learn essential knowledge of becoming an expert witness to the court. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
Learn essential knowledge of becoming an expert witness to the court. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
Learn essential knowledge of becoming an expert witness to the court. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends
The British Psychological Society is sponsoring three sessions at the Cheltenham Literature Festival as part of our work to bring insights from evidence-based science to a wider public.
As a juror in a criminal trial, you are meant to make a judgment of the defendant's guilt or innocence based on the evidence and arguments presented.
Police professionals are better observers than members of the public says a study published in a BPS Journal this week.
Bridging the gap between psychological theory and practice Conference overview
The Autism and Criminal Justice System Network was set up in October 2012 and aims to promote and facilitate the transfer of research-based knowledge between specialist psychologists, Criminal Justice System (CJS) professions, policy makers, inter
Members of the public have a fixed and faulty view of what stalkers look like, and this has potential implications for victims and court proceedings.   That is the finding of research presented today by Dr Simon Duff from the University of Nottingham to the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Forensic Psychology in Manchester.
The British Psychological Society has published a new position paper on ‘Children and young people with neuro-disabilities in the criminal justice system’.
The general election manifestos of the UK’s political parties contain sweeping claims about the causes of crime and policies to reduce it. Experts, including members of the British Psychological Society, are warning today that such broad statements are nearly always wrong.
Their actions are criminal and they cause untold misery, but repeat burglars are skilled at what they do and in that sense they are experts.
A recent report, compiled by the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, has explored how often American courts currently use neuroscience in trials.
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