Law and Crime

The criminal justice system must be better equipped to identify people with autistic spectrum disorders. Graeme Hydari, a consultant solicitor at Hodge Jones & Allen LLP, says this is essential to ensure people with these conditions are given appropriate professional support.
The Society runs a series of four skills-based workshops for psychologists acting as expert witnesses.
The first of two Autism and the Criminal Justice System (CJS) Project conferences was held on 19 September 2013 at Greater Manchester Police Training Centre, Sedgley Park.
A new research report paints a stark picture of the risks of victimisation to people with mental health problems in the community, and the barriers they face in getting the support and help they need.
We're all familiar with the good cop, bad cop interrogation technique so often portrayed in TV and film.
Mentally unwell people should not be detained in police cells when mental health units are unable to take them in.
Through our partnership with the Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCPMH) the British Psychological Society has contributed to a new guide for commissioners of forensic mental health services.  
One of the main arguments for having more police is that they act as a deterrent. With more officers on the street, more would-be criminals can be stopped and questioned; more wrong-doers can be arrested.
The ruling by the European Court of Human Rights against whole-life prison sentences without review has focused attention on the possibility of rehabilitation.
A new pilot scheme has been launched to reduce the number of instances where people with mental health problems are detained in the wrong environment.
Following the failure of Ian Brady's bid to be transferred from a psychiatric hospital back to prison, Professor Peter Kinderman - Director of the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Psychology, Health & Society and a former chair of o
Prisoner populations in Northern Ireland (NI) show a higher percentage of paranoid characteristics than those in England and Wales. 
Saying ‘no comment’ in a police interview can make you look guilty suggests research being presented at the Division of Forensic (DFP) Psychology annual conference today at Queen's University Belfast.
Dishevelled, diminutive and deep in thought, the TV detective Columbo would often bring a cigar-bearing hand to his forehead. You could almost hear the cogs whirring.
Male prisoners in England and Wales are to have numerous privileges taken from them when they are first sent behind bars.
The day will offer an introduction to the area of Expert Witness and Medical- Legal work and consider the opportunities within this for Counselling Psychologists. 
Any efforts to tackle the problem of online dating scams should take the emotional state of the person being conned into account.
The idea that police on our streets makes people feel safer is usually taken as a given.
Cross-examining child witnesses in court fails to get to the truth, suggests a new study published this week in our Legal and Criminological Psychology journal.  The study, undertaken by Rhiannon Fogliati and Kay Bussey from Macquarie University, Australia, examined the assumption that cross-examination produces a more truthful testimony.
Aggression in men is not linked to the shape of their face.
Imagine you are on a jury: would you trust the testimony of a drunk eyewitness?
Researchers have developed a new test aimed at catching out individuals who are able to cheat lie detectors.
New laws have been introduced to tackle stalking in England and Wales.
This workshop aims to provide the participants with the knowledge needed to become a reliable and sought after expert witness in the civil courts. Unfortunately this event is cancelled
This workshop aims to develop knowledge and practice in the area of self-harm and suicidal behaviour in forensic settings.
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