Law and Crime

This workshop is for anyone interested in learning about meta-synthesis of qualitative research for the purposes of systematically reviewing a diverse evidence base. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee
The workshop will offer a clear and structured introduction to a number of current professional and ethical issues likely to be encountered within psychological practice. Timetable
Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends Details Pluralism in qualitative research combines methods, analyses or interpretations to se
This workshop will offer researchers who are more used to working within quantitative paradigms some ways, advantages and challenges of combining quantitative methods with qualitative methods to conduct mixed methods research.  Timeta
An overview of the challenges involved in designing and evaluating behaviour change interventions with the potential to have population-level impact, especially in relation to health promotion. Timetable 09:30 Regi
Never has it been more urgent that we understand why people are drawn to extremist beliefs and to violent extremist organisations.
A "collective hysteria" affected many courts following the 2011 riots in England, a new study has concluded.
Could a little fear of crime be helpful in preventing people from committing criminal acts or becoming victims of crime themselves?
According to decades of psychology research, most people, including law enforcement professionals, are useless at detecting lies. But a new paper argues that nearly all previous lie detection research has been unrealistic.
The North West of England Branch of the British Psychological Society held its inaugural Forensic Psychology conference at the Manchester Conference Centre on Friday 17 October.
The British Psychological Society, Sense about Science and NatCen Social Research, with the support of the Alliance for Useful Evidence, are hosting a panel debate on crime reduction at the Liberal Democrats’ Autumn Conference on Tuesday 7 October.
Sense about Science, the British Psychological Society and NatCen Social Research, with the support of the Alliance for Useful Evidence, are hosting a panel debate on crime reduction at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham today (Tuesday 30 September).
Early intervention could reduce the risk of aggressive children going on to become psychiatrically troubled and commit violent acts, according to new research.
The Autism & Criminal Justice System Network held its second conference last week at City University, London. Subject under discussion included:
Thursday 23 October and Friday 24 October The Harbour Heights Hotel, 73 Haven Rd, Poole, Dorset BH13 7LW Confirmed speakers:
Suspects of crime could be given away by their eyes, new research suggests.
Reoffending rates in Scotland could be reduced if brain injuries among prisoners are recognised sooner, psychologists are argued at a Justice Committee hearing this week.
Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) has acquired a mythical status and provided the inspiration for at least two feature-length films.
Parental alienation – a child’s unwarranted rejection of one parent and strong alignment with the other following high conflict family breakdown – leaves the alienated parent feeling powerless.  Despite recognition in recent high court judgem
Young people who enjoy committing arson are predisposed to engaging in other kinds of anti-social behaviour, a new study has concluded.
A recent study shows that people are more accurate at identifying liars when relying on their emotional reaction to the lie rather than making a conscious decision.
When men are aggressive towards women, their behaviour is often driven by the feeling that their masculinity has been threatened.
Experiencing a burglary is a serious threat to people's mental health, a survey has confirmed.
Domestic homicide campaigners have welcomed a change in Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) policy after a new guidance note was issued following meetings with a victims’ famiiy lobbying.
New research suggests older people may make less reliable eyewitnesses. Research conducted by Dr Helen Kaye of The Open University involved 134 people aged between 22 and 66 years old, who were asked to watch video footage of a mugging.
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