Ethics and Practice

This workshop is designed to help continue to uphold and enhance our professional standards as psychologists (both qualified and in-training). Specifically this workshop aims to:
Date: Friday 28 November 2014 Time: 18:00 - 20:00 Venue: GC1.08, Tower Building, 166-220 Holloway Road, N7 8DB (opposite Holloway Road tube station)
This workshop is for anyone interested in learning about meta-synthesis of qualitative research for the purposes of systematically reviewing a diverse evidence base. Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee
The workshop will offer a clear and structured introduction to a number of current professional and ethical issues likely to be encountered within psychological practice. Timetable
Timetable 09:30 Registration/Tea and Coffee 10:00 Workshop starts (there will be a break for lunch) 16:30 Workshop ends Details Pluralism in qualitative research combines methods, analyses or interpretations to se
This workshop will offer researchers who are more used to working within quantitative paradigms some ways, advantages and challenges of combining quantitative methods with qualitative methods to conduct mixed methods research.  Timeta
This workshop will provide an opportunity to enhance your professional practice in relation to designing, implementing and evaluating psychological interventions underpinned by current integrative innovative developments in theory, research and pr
Today over 135 healthcare professionals and politicians are discussing how to deliver compassionate healthcare within NHS Wales following the criticisms highlighted by the Francis and Trusted to Care reports.
Implementing NHS Culture Change: Contributions from Occupational Psychology The Division of Occupational Psychology (DOP) will be launching their policy report, ‘Implementing NHS Culture Change: Contributions from Occupati
Just over half a century ago, Stanley Milgram ran the most renowned studies in the history of psychology. He showed how ordinary people can do extraordinary harm to others when asked to do so. His conclusion, made famous through his film of the research, Obedience, was that humans are programmed to obey orders, no matter how noxious.
No matter where you travel on earth, you'll likely have no problem recognising when someone is angry with you.
Commissioners of mental health services are to receive guidance to help ensure black and minority ethnic (BME) communities receive adequate suppor
People respond differently to moral dilemmas if they are using a foreign language, a new study has revealed.
Welcome to the website for our 2015 Annual Conference to be held on 5-7 May at the ACC Liverpool which is located on the banks of the River Mersey right next to the iconic Albert Dock.
People who commit reckless or immoral acts are less likely to be judged harshly if they avoid serious consequences suggests a study published today in the Society's British Journal of Psychology.
Our use of laughter and swearing as forms of emotional expression are two of the topics featured in a new BPS series of audio interviews with prominent psychologists.
The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) has welcomed a draft bill from the Law Commission that sets out proposals aiming to reform the regulation of health and social care professionals.
Psychologists have suggested more may need to be done to protect academics from pressures that could lead to mental health problems.
The ways broadcasters could help protect vulnerable people during and after media interviews are discussed by Sian Williams, broadcaster, journalist and psychology student, in this month’s issue of The Psychologist. 
The Academy of Social Sciences is to host a one-day conference in early 2014 in which delegates will be able to explore the development of common ethics principles for social sci
New BPS guidelines aim to help with the questions, sometimes non-obvious, and challenges in adhering to existing ethics principles in relation to internet-mediated research (IMR).
There's an ethical consensus in medicine that it's wrong to give patients with physical illness false hope. But what about patients with mental health problems? Might the provision of unrealistic optimism be a vital part of their treatment?
Shaking hands with a cheat or thief, or merely sitting in a chair they used, is likely to make you experience feelings of guilt.
British Muslim women who wear the hijab feel generally better about their body image than those who don’t wear the hijab suggests research published in the British Journal of Psychology today.
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