Eating disorders

Clinicians and neuroscientists must work together to understand and improve psychological treatments says an article in Nature magazine.
Updated draft NICE guidance on obesity proposes that very-low-calorie diets should be used more selectively and includes new recommendations on weight loss surgery for people with type 2 diabetes.
Children as young as five could be resorting to comfort eating as a way of coping with stress, delegates at the European Congress on Obesity in Bulgaria have heard.
Understanding what self-control is and how it works has fascinated cognitive psychologists for decades, and more recently has led to the idea that perhaps we can harness our knowledge of cognition to temper compulsive behaviours.
Offering children access to gardening schemes helps to encourage healthier eating habits.  
People who attend slimming groups are more likely to read and understand the nutritional information given on food compared with those who are not on a diet.  
When the American Medical Association formally recognised obesity as a disease in June 2013, plenty of public health officials were thrilled for the increases in research, treatment, and prevention funding that would presumably arise as a result.
Men with eating disorders are frequently being overlooked because people assume that conditions such as anorexia and bulimia are women's problems, a new study has suggested.
Providing cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for people with mental health disorders such as depression and eating disorders could provide them with long-term benefits without the need for drugs, an expert on the talking treatment has said.
The launch of a clinical commissioning guide on weight loss services today (20 March) has been welcomed by experts across several disciplines. The guidance has been developed through a process accredited by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.
The Northern Ireland Branch of the British Psychological Society has voiced concern at how eating disorders services have been organised and delivered in Northern Ireland.
Women who regularly use Facebook may be at risk of becoming dissatisfied with their bodies and even developing eating disorders, according to new research.
Too many people with eating disorders are being dismissed by doctors as simply having peculiar habits with food, Cosmopolitan UK magazine and the charity Beat have warned.
Children are likely to have higher than average levels of cortisol if they are obese, new research has revealed.
The same impulsive behaviour that leads some individuals to abuse drugs and alcohol could also be behind particularly unhealthy relationships with food,
A 2007 Foresight Report famously warned that half of the British population could be obese by 2050 if the trend to eat too much and exercise too little continued.
Young people could be experiencing behaviour associated with eating disorders much earlier than previously thought, a new study has discovered.
Consuming the right amount of fruit and vegetables every day is down to planning ahead, effort and motivation. This is the finding of a study by researchers at the Lisbon University Institute published in the British Journal of Health Psychology today.
Official figures have revealed a drop in the obesity rate among English school children. The proportion of primary school children deemed to be overweight and obese has slumped in the last year, official statistics have revealed.
New figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre show that the number of children being treated for eating disorders has increased rapidly.
Being in a satisfying relationship appears to correspond with a more positive body image in women, according to a new study. A team at the Tallinn University in Estonia collected data from 256 women between the ages of 20 and 45.
Looking at too many photographs of food can result in people not enjoying their meals as much.
The layout of a buffet can have a significant impact on what people will choose to fill their plates, with many going for the items they come across first rather than what they truly desire.  
Welcome! The Faculty for Eating Disorders is a group for psychologists who are members of the Division of Clinical Psychology and who work in or have an interest or expertise in the field of eating disorders.
Through the our partnership with Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCPMH) the British Psychological Society has contributed to a new guide for commissioners of eating disorders services.
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