Children and Family

MindEd, the e-learning portal on young people’s mental health, celebrates its first anniversary this week. Today the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has secured an additional £560,000 in funding to build on the work of MindEd to design, develop and deliver an additional suite of online education materials providing information, advice and guidance on children and young people’s mental health specifically tailored to all parents and carers in England.
The British Psychological Society welcomes the announcement of a five-year plan for a complete overhaul of mental health services for children and young people in England.
A workshop for interested members of the Faculty for Children, Young People & Their Families
The government has announced a five-year plan for a complete overhaul of mental health services for children and young people in England. The announcement follows a review of services by a government taskforce, which found that many young people are not able to access the help they need.
Innovative Practice in Challenging TimesFriday 5th June 2015 at Chancellors Hotel & Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital
These days it's hard to avoid the message that thin is best. From advertising billboards to the Oscar red carpet, we are inundated with images of successful ultra-thin women.
The SS Great Britain in Great Western Dockyard, Bristol, is the striking venue for a British Psychological Society meeting on the prevention, management and treatment of concussion and other mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children later this month.
Children who sometimes lack sympathy for others are more likely to share resources with those friends if they respect their morals suggests a paper published this week in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology.
Senior mental health professionals working in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are reporting major concerns about reductions in service for children with mental health problems in England. 
Millions of women around the world have given birth to children with the help of IVF and related medical procedures.
Threatening children with punishment if they tell a lie is ultimately counter-productive, a study has suggested.
All parents have to come to terms with the fact that their little angels will, from time to time, act like little devils. They’ll throw tantrums over trivial issues, or they’ll push, hit, bite or scratch other kids.
Schools and professionals should be aware of hidden factors associated when young people help each other with issues around self-harm
Different labels for difficulties with reading have been found to be associated with varying beliefs in how effective teachers believe they can be.
A growing number of young people are being admitted to hospital with self-harming injuries, new figures have revealed.
Employees using various technological devices to stay 'switched on' for work outside of office hours may face detrimental effects to their wellbeing and private life says a study presented today at the British Psychological Society’s Division of Occupational Psychology annual conference in Glasgow.
The aim of the day is to update members on the current political landscape with regard to mental health provision in schools, and to allow time for us to discuss how clinical psychologists currently provide this input, and how things might change.
In this event, several topics concerning early intervention and assessment of parent-child relationships will be discussed.
There is an urgent need for local authorities to examine their policies on intervention where pre-school children have behavioural, emotional and social difficulties. That is the conclusion of an online survey of 136 educational psychologists from across the United Kingdom.
Antenatal classes only serve to increase fathers' feelings of separation from their pregnant partners, according to a series of in-depth interviews with 10 White British fathers.
Children are more likely to attempt suicide if their parents have also tried to kill themselves, a new study has revealed.
Children with autism can become more assertive if they have grown up with pets in the home, suggests a new study.
Today’s Guardian reports the findings of a survey on the prescription of drugs to treat hyperactivity in preschool children.
Infants who are behaviourally inhibited and insecurely attached to their parents are more likely to develop anxiety problems as teenagers, according to a new study.
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