Children and Family

Specific language used by mothers to talk to their babies can help their child to understand the thoughts of others when they get older, suggests a new study published today in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology (BJDP).
The Performance of Child Eyewitnesses With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder
If you're the father to a good-looking boy, you might want to give him your thanks – his handsome looks apparently mean women will tend to find you more attractive.
Strong relationships with other family members can help raise self-esteem and reduce anxiety for some young people who grow up in homes affected by parental domestic violence says a paper presented today at the British Psychological Society’s Psychology of Women Section’s (POWS) annual conference being held in Windsor.
The Psychologist will be making an appearance at a major UK festival this month. ‘The Psychologist and Wellcome Trust presents…’ slot at the Latitude Festival pairs Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore with author Fiona Neill for a discussion on ‘Being Young Never Gets Old – Teenagers Debunked’.
A single supportive close friendship can help young people from low-income backgrounds to thrive in challenging circumstances, according to a new study in the British Journal of Psychology..
Programme 09.30 – 10.00Welcome, registration and coffee 
This joint CPD event is informed by discussions between the Faculties for People with Intellectual Disabilities and for Children & Young People’s regarding areas of common concern, not least recognition of limited progress in the post-Winterbo
There is probably nothing more fun than making a baby or toddler laugh. And now there's news that it could even help with learning – the toddlers' not the adults'.
The Child & LAC Sigs of DCPNI have been granted funding by DCPNI to run a free member event ‘Child Attachment Interview – An introduction to the administration of the interview’.  Places are limited to 30 and will be granted on a
Have you ever watched a young child perform a delicate task with their hands and noticed how they stick out their tongue at the same time?
Lots of research, much of it contradictory, has looked into whether having children brings happiness.
The editors of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology have put together a free virtual issue on the work-family inte
"The Culture of Poverty”, published in 1966, was hugely influential, persuading many policy makers that children from low-income families are destined for lives of “criminality, joblessness, and poverty” because they exist in enclaves characterise
The Division of Clinical Psychology's Children, Young People and their Families Faculty are pleased to open registration for this study day.
Children are more likely to display troublesome behaviour in families in which the father feels unsupported by his partner. These findings by Doctoral Researcher Rachel Latham from the University of Sussex were presented today at the Annual Conference of the British Psychology Society in Liverpool.
Young people are aware of the risks of cyberbullying but perceive others as being more at risk than themselves. Young women are more vulnerable to this perception than young men. 
For adults, let alone children, time is a tricky concept to comprehend.
Psychologists have documented a striking increase in references to alcohol and heavy drinking in the lyrics of UK chart music.
One of the longest-debated and most studied issues in psychology is whether and how our personalities are affected by our birth order and the sex of our siblings.
Children diagnosed with autism often have distinctive sensory experiences, such as being ultra sensitive to noise, or finding enjoyment in repeated, unusual sensory stimulation.
A longitudinal study in Brazil was a hit with the media recently due to its findings on the positive impact of breastfeeding on cognition.
The British Psychological Society is one of a number of organisations that have signed a letter to The Times calling for a radical overhaul of youth mental health services.
Children who have suffered concussion should return to physical activity as it is safe for them to do so, an American neuropsychologist will tell a conference in Bristol today.
Syndicate content