Arts and Entertainment

Neuroscientist Dr Kris De Meyer (King’s College London) and filmmaker Sheila Marshall are putting the finishing touches to Right Between Your Ears, a documentary about how we can become convinced that we are right, even when we are completely wron
Psychologists have documented a striking increase in references to alcohol and heavy drinking in the lyrics of UK chart music.
If you are a health psychology practitioner, academic or trainee then our Division of Health Psychology is challenging you to encapsulate the essence of health psychology in an image that you have created, accompanied by 150 words.
The super-heroines who feature in the X-Men series and other comic-book films challenge traditional gender stereotypes in the sense that they are powerful, strong and smart.
That's the suggestion of a new study discussed on our Research Digest blog.
Most of the time, when a magician asks you to "pick a card" she makes it feel as though you have a free choice, but you don't really.
The shortlist for the 2015 Wellcome Book Prize has been announced.
Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Art Gallery is hosting a photo exhibition of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) baring their scars in celebration of life, led by psychologist Dr Liza Morton.
These days there's no need to take the trouble of visiting art museums. You can usually view all the exhibits on your computer, in the comfort of your own home. And yet, attendance at art museums has been rising over recent years.
A guest post on our Research Digest blog by Sam McNerney tries to find out.  
A clinical psychologist who has worked in NHS mental health services in Shropshire for the last 20 years has been honoured by the British Psychological Society. Dr Guy Holmes has won the 2014 Award for Distinguished Contribution to Psychology in Practice.
Madlove, an interactive art exhibit reimagining a psychiatric hospital, is set to receive a 2014 public engagement grant from the British Psychological Society.
Musical training can help to enhance a person's cognitive abilities, a new study has revealed.
Television programmes such as Coronation Street, Holby City and Homeland have been commended for their depiction of mental health problems.
Yesterday evening Professor Sophie Scott spoke on the science of laughter to a meeting of the British Psychological Society's South West of England Branch at the University of Exeter.
A person's enjoyment of a movie can be heavily influenced by their surroundings, according to a new
It’s the time of year, at least in our part of the world, when darkness encroaches on us—literally and metaphorically.
This event is fully booked. Please call +44 (0)116 2529512 to be added to a waiting list. 
The thought processes that enable people to judge art vary significantly between men and women, according to a new study.
When an accomplished creative writer gets on with their craft, their brain operates in a somewhat different way to a novice's.
Photographs depicting daily life in the Lake District between the 1930s and 1960s are helping to trigger memories in people with dementia.
A session in the Cheltenham Literature Festival on Sunday 12 October will discuss the famous Stanford marshmallow experiment.
A talk at the Cheltenham Literature Festival tomorrow (Friday 10 October) aims to inspire listeners to see mindfulness as a way of 'being', a different way of approaching everyday life,
A person's age can influence how receptive they are to certain types of humour, a new study has found.
The pleasures and perils of ageing are the subject of the first of three sessions being sponsored at the Cheltenham Literature Festival by the British Psychological Society.
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