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When athletes decide to retire, one of the most commonly suggested career paths is coaching.  Someone who has spent most of their life training for a sport and becoming an expert in it may feel that they want to give something back as a coach. 

A rugby union tackle

Yesterday’s ceremony marked the end of the London 2012 Olympic Games. But what long-term effect will the success of British athletes and the Games as a whole have on the country?

Celebratory fireworks

Music has been integral to London 2012, throughout the opening ceremony and all Olympic events. It also promises to play a key role in Sunday’s closing ceremony.

‘The Wall’ is the term used to describe the point (usually after 20 miles) in a marathon when an athlete experiences a severe drop in pace. Usually, this is thought to coincide with an athlete running out of fuel in the form of glycogen. However, it is quite possible that there is also a psychological component to the Wall. 

Body language – gestures, facial expressions, eye movement, breathing patterns, skin colour changes, muscle tone, interpersonal distance, and posture – is thought to play a key role in sport, as the majority of communication there is done through the body.

Team GB's athletes are being assisted in their bids for Olympic glory by the support of the home crowd.

"I feel like I've let myself down, let my coaches down, let everybody I've ever trained with down, let my mum and dad and brother down."

A sports psychologist has played an important part in Britain's rowing success in the Olympics.

The Premiership rugby union club London Waps and the mental health chairty Mind have announced that they are to work in partnership.

Top athletes, including Team GB's gold medalist Greg Searle, have come out of retirement especially to compete in London 2012.