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There are huge benefits to be gained when women and men are given equal opportunities. For example, companies with at least one woman on their board are more successful.

Researchers have argued that penalty shootouts in competitions such as the World Cup are ultimately "psychological" games.

Practising at a particular discipline or activity often helps to improve competence, a new study has concluded.

With the Commonwealth Games under way in Glasgow, psychologists can help explain just what it is that the public finds enticing about big sporting events.

Two people in a crowd reacting

The final stages of big football tournaments are often dominated by penalty shootouts. And research presented at our Annual Conference a few years ago may just have given the key to success in them.

A goalkeeper in red making a save

Just before the triumph that was the Grand Depart in Yorkshire, our monthly magazine The Psychologist investigated how psychology touches the participants, spectators and volunteers in the Tour de France:

A cycle race

As Yorkshire awaits the start of the Tour de France, a psychologist is to give a public talk on the psychology behind the event in York on Tuesday 1 July.

The reputation of a coach can be pivotal when it comes to getting the best out of footballers.

This is conclusion of research by a team led by Dr Andrew Manley from Leeds Metropolitan University. Their findings are published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports.

A blackboard showing football tactics

With the World Cup in full swing, many youngsters will no doubt be wondering how they too can one day join their country's team and play for glory - and it turns out that mental toughness could be key to making their dreams come true.