Patient and Public Involvement in Research: What, Why, When and How

Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

 

Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) in health research is about “doing research with, or by, the public rather than to, about, or for the public”. PPI theory has now become formalised into policy, with Department of Health research governance guidance stipulating it should exist at every stage of the research process. This workshop explores the what, why, when and how of PPI. It considers some of the barriers to PPI and how these can be overcome.  It also highlights examples of good practice in PPI and considers approaches to assessing and demonstrating PPI impact on the research process.

Timetable

09:00 Registration/Tea and Coffee
09:30 Workshop starts
12:30 to 13:00 Lunch
16:30 Workshop ends

Details

This workshop explores the what, why, when and how of PPI. It considers some of the barriers to PPI and how these can be overcome.  It also highlights examples of good practice in PPI and considers approaches to assessing and demonstrating PPI impact on the research process.

The workshop should appeal to a wide range of psychologists and researchers who wish to understand more about meaningful involvement of service users, patients and the public in the design, conduct and dissemination of research. The workshop is suitable for chartered psychologists, those currently working toward their Stage 2 training as well as other researchers who wish to improve their understanding of PPI in research.

Learning outcomes and objectives

  • To increase appreciation of the ethical, scientific and political arguments in support of PPI
  • To increase awareness of the different models of PPI
  • To highlight how and when PPI can be incorporated into the research process
  • To encourage a positive approach to PPI among workshop participants 

At the end of the day, attendees should be able to:

  • Appreciate the justifications for PPI
  • Be familiar with different models of PPI
  • Be aware of how patients/members of the public can be involved in research
  • Understand the barriers to and promoters of good PPI
  • Be aware of examples of good (and bad) PPI practice.
  • Know about available resources for PPI.

Facilitators: Professor Ann Jacoby & Dr Paula Byrne

Ann Jacoby is Professor of Medical Sociology in the Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool.  She has worked as a dedicated health services researcher since 1985, her major methodological interests being assessment of patient-focussed outcomes of medical care, particularly in the context of clinical trials; measurement of quality of life; and service user satisfaction. Her research on QOL outcomes of treatment for epilepsy, including in the three largest clinical trials worldwide, has contributed to national policy documents on epilepsy care provision and more widely; and she has an international profile for her work on epilepsy stigma. She is Regional Lead for PPI in the NIHR-funded North West Research Design Service and currently chairs the Training Working Group for the North West People in Research Forum. She is also joint lead for the Patient Perspectives theme in the MRC North West Hub for Trials Methodology Research.

Paula Byrne is a lecturer in the Department of Health Services Research at the University of Liverpool.  Her research interests include the making of medical diagnoses, sickness certification, and the use of medical and social technologies for older people. She teaches psychology and social sciences at undergraduate and postgraduate level to medical and associated health professionals and is a member of the University’s ethics committee and is a PPI adviser for the Research Design Service in the North West.

Location: 

BPS London office.

Dates: 
16/03/2012
Contact Information: 

BPS Learning Centre

Tel. +44(0)116 252 9925

Organiser: 
BPS Learning Centre, Division of Health Psychology