The Psychologist Vol 23 No 10 October 2010

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Editorial

Golf: 'a good walk spoiled' (Mark Twain), or 'an interesting sport from a psychological perspective' (Jones and Lavallee, p.806)? Having tried it a couple of times, I would perhaps describe it as 'maddening' rather than 'interesting'. In fact, I would side with the author John Updike, who described golf as 'a non-chemical hallucinogen'. Even the pros can find the experience akin to a never-ending bad 'trip'. The American Doug Sanders missed an apparently unmissable 3-foot putt at the 1970 Open. 'Do I ever think about the putt?' he said 35 years later. 'Only every four or five minutes.'

Last month's open access issue seemed to be well-received. Please continue to tell your students and colleagues about it: see tinyurl.com/bpsgift2010 or www.thepsychologist.org.uk, and get in touch if you know of any budding talent for 'new voices'. Dr Jon Sutton (Managing Editor)

Contents

A good walk worth watching
Marc Jones and David Lavallee on the psychology of golf

Fathers' behaviours and children's problems    
Eirini Flouri with an overview   

So you think you can dance?    
Paul M. Jenkinson and Aikaterini (Katerina) Fotopoulou look at an example of good intentions and poor awareness in the motor system

The man who looks inside people's heads    
Chris Frith talks to Lance Workman about schizophrenia, scanning and more

Working lives: An NHS alcohol service    
Clare Kambamettu, Elinor Llewellyn, Mary Longley and Paul Davis report  

Plus...

Forum
Scanning for autism; scientific misconduct; A-levels; Pakistan floods; psychosis tapestry; the latest nuggets from the Research Digest; Mark Sergeant on media coverage surrounding the trapped Chilean miners; and more  

Book reviews     
Safer surgery; reading development; autism and intensive interaction; stories and analogies; Barbara Tizard; and coaching

Society   
President's column; bipolar report; independent practitioners forum; Society awards; a view from Northern Ireland; and more

Careers
We meet members of the University of the West of England's Centre for Appearance Research; and hear from Anita Mehay and Zoё Fortune about life as mental health researchers; plus featured and other jobs, and how to advertise

Looking back   
When is merely 'looking' back not enough? Mark Smith considers the explosion of sensory history

One on one 
......with Jeune Guishard-Pine