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Counselling Psychology Blog

We are always actively seeking members’ input to a great number of live consultations on policy issues related to psychology. Right now, two are particularly worthy of mention.

 In April, following the comprehensive spending review and significant further pressure on public spending in health and social care, the UK government announced that: “From 1 August 2017, new nursing, midwifery and allied health students will no longer receive NHS bursaries. Instead, they will have access to the same student loans system as other students.” That means  nursing and other healthcare students will soon be required to take out loans to fund their training.

The Department of Health has launched a consultation on how to implement this change and we are seeking our members’ views on how to respond. We are deeply concerned about the possible impact on these students, and therefore on the ability of the health and social care systems to deliver the services upon which we all rely.

Although student loans are now the norm in England and Wales, this is not the case across the UK as a whole. I remain committed to the idea that free, universal, education is an ideal of any civilised society. More importantly, for these particular students, the prospect of tens of thousands of pounds of additional debt at the end of training will have a negative impact on the future of these professionals and the patients in their care.

Our response is likely to stress the unwelcome nature of these changes for the overall delivery of psychological health care. Providing the best standards of care requires many different types of healthcare professionals working together in multi-disciplinary teams – any negative impact to one part of the system will have a knock on effect.

Currently, training for Clinical Psychology and some other mental health professions (including psychological therapists in the IAPT programme and child psychotherapists) that are funded indirectly by Health Education England are unaffected.

We are cautiously reassured that psychologists have been spared from the effects of these reforms for now. This move reflects the recognition that psychologists in training deliver invaluable services to the NHS… much like our junior doctor colleagues.

At the same time, a different arm of the political octopus – the House of Commons public accounts committee (not, technically, an arm of Government, but holding government to account) – has announced a call for evidence on the topic of ‘improving access to mental health services’.

The public accounts committee noted various positive steps taken (or announced) in this area: clear commitments from the prime minister and the Department of Health to improve mental health services, for ‘parity of esteem’ between physical and mental health, and, therefore clear access and waiting time standards.

The committee has raised concerns, following a rather sceptical report by the National Audit Office that said the cost of improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT), early intervention in psychosis and liaison psychiatry services could be 25 per cent higher than clinical commissioning groups have spent in the past and that their budgets may not stretch.

The British Psychological Society will be making a written submission to the Committee. Our view is likely to be that it is not only welcome but necessary, to follow through with these ‘Parity of Esteem’ commitments. People have a right to expect the NHS to provide NICE-recommended care whether in the field of physical or mental healthcare.

Investment in health and social care is not only a moral imperative and necessary for a well-functioning society, but it also represents value for money. Psychological health, particularly preventative and early intervention services, represents a clear net saving to the public purse in the avoidance of higher, future, costs.

The BPS has a stronger influence if we respond in one unified voice. If you wish to add to our discussions please contribute by emailing the Society consultations address or contact me directly. 

Find out more about my plans for next week.

Wed, 01/06/2016 - 15:07

The cliché is that we should fix our own oxygen masks before helping others. Working in a therapeutic profession is a privilege, but there are good, even self-serving, reasons to ensure that those professionals changed with helping others are properly protected.

Many of us have been concerned by apparent pressures on junior doctors and proposals to require young people entering nursing and other professions to take out loans to fund their training. And there are pressures on the ‘psych’ professions, too.

A short time ago, we reported on the findings from the joint British Psychological Society and New Savoy Partnership staff wellbeing survey. This revealed worrying apparent increases in staff stress since a similar survey in 2014, with 46 per cent of psychological professionals surveyed reporting depressed mood and 49 per cent reporting feeling they are a failure. Seventy per cent of the 1348 people surveyed said they were finding their job stressful. More details of the survey, and the results, can be found in a detailed paper.

I’m delighted that the BPS, in collaboration with the New Savoy Partnership and with the support of Public Health England, launched a Charter for Psychological Staff Wellbeing and Resilience. But we also have a responsibility to act.

So, on 21 June, at the BPS London Offices, we’ll see the next stage in this process, when Jamie Hacker Hughes (Vice-President of the BPS) and Jeremy Clarke (Chair of the New Savoy Conference) will launch a Collaborative Learning Network to share best practice on practical measures to improve staff wellbeing.

We have an obligation to our colleagues and to those who use our services to ensure that our workplaces are compassionate and safe. We need to use our skills to facilitate accountable autonomy, reflective practice, participation in decision-making, staff engagement and creation of a non-discriminatory ethos, where difference and diversity are meaningfully sought alongside work-life balance. These are valuable for us as employees, but they are also vital if we are to have compassionate and empathic services.

Find out more about my plans for next week.

Wed, 25/05/2016 - 11:13

Tomorrow, Saturday 10 October, is World Mental Health Day. I have sent this letter to the press to highlight the role psychologists can play in ensuring those living with mental health issues live with dignity.

This Saturday, 10 October, many organisations and individuals will be involved in activities to highlight the 2015 World Mental Health Day. We know that one in four people in the UK will experience psychological ill health but that only one quarter will receive ongoing treatment. Awareness days such as this are helpful to challenge stigma and ensure that psychological wellbeing is seen as being equally important as good physical health.

This year the focus is on ensuring those living with mental health issues can live with dignity. Dignity in psychological healthcare means ensuring those who need help are able to access it in a reasonable time and without fear of stigma, especially in vulnerable groups. Our members tell us that access for all age groups can be patchy in different parts of the UK. We need to hold the Government to its commitment to increase funding for mental health and guarantee parity of esteem (equity of provision, availability and access) with physical health.

As the President of an organisation representing psychology I’m aware of the challenges of further integration of physical and psychological health care services. However, it’s a task that we must continue to work towards in order to provide the very best care and the best results. We can best empower those using psychological health services by involving them in decision making and care planning, in exercising choice between therapies offered and in ensuring informed consent to any intervention.

For those seeking treatment, the Society’s website hosts a number of searchable lists of registered psychologists. These can be found at www.bps.org.uk/find-a-psychologist.

The Society and its publishing partner Wiley have put together a selection of journal articles relevant to the day’s theme. 

We have also organised two free public lectures in Northern Ireland. 

Fri, 09/10/2015 - 16:38